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One Health Newsletter - Volume 8, Issue 2 - Published July 3, 2015
Emerging Pathogens Institute at the University of Florida (USA)
Saturday, July 04, 2015.

Notice:

 One Health Newsletter - Volume 8, Issue 2 - Published July 3, 2015

An Internationally distributed product of the Emerging Pathogens Institute at the University of Florida (USA) http://epi.ufl.edu

This quarterly newsletter is dedicated to enhancing the integration of animal, human, and environmental health for the benefit of all by demonstrating One Health in practice. 

The One Health Newsletter is a collaborative effort by a diverse group of scientists and health professionals committed to promoting One Health.

Please email co-editors with questions, comments, or suggestions for articles, upcoming events, or publications to share relevant to One Health.

One Health article submissions and participants are welcomed from all nations.  Indeed, readers from over 150 countries are known to access this Newsletter each month.

SEE: http://media.news.health.ufl.edu/misc/egh/One%20Health%20Newsletter/OHNL_Volume_8_Issue2.pdf


Repeat One Health journal notice: International Journal of One Health (India)
International Journal of One Health (India)
Wednesday, July 01, 2015.

Repeat One Health journal notice:

International Journal of One Health (India)

http://www.onehealthjournal.org/

Open access and peer reviewed journal on Human, Animal and Environmental health

Aims and Scope: International Journal of One Health publishes papers focusing on One Health (Human, Animal and Environmental health). Topic includes agro-bioterrorism, animal science, antimicrobial resistance, bacteriology, biosecurity, bioterrorism, climate change, comparative medicine, disaster management, ecology, entomology, environmental health, epidemiology, food science, food security, global trade and commerce, health communication, human health, immunology, infectious disease, nutrition, occupational health, parasitology, pathology, physiology, public health and public policy, toxicology, veterinary science, virology, wildlife protection, zoonoses etc.

Audience: International Journal of One Health is of interest to those in human medicine, veterinary medicine, infectious diseases, public health, parasitology, food science, epidemiology, immunology, virology, bacteriology, nutrition, pathology, physiology, wildlife, toxicology, environmental health.

Please send pre-submission queries to editoronehealth@gmail.com

Please refer instructions to authors at http://www.onehealthjournal.org/instructions.html
Submit your manuscript online at http://my.ejmanager.com/ijoh/


How urbanization affects the epidemiology of emerging infectious diseases
Neiderud C-J (2015) How urbanization affects the epidemiology of emerging infectious diseases. Infection Ecology and Epidemiology, 5: 27060 http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/iee.v5.27060
Thursday, June 25, 2015.

Infection Ecology and Epidemiology The One Health Journal (IEE)

How urbanization affects the epidemiology of emerging infectious diseases

Carl-Johan Neiderud, MD, Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

Neiderud C-J (2015) How urbanization affects the epidemiology of emerging infectious diseases. Infection Ecology and Epidemiology, 5: 27060 http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/iee.v5.27060

Abstract

“The world is becoming more urban every day, and the process has been ongoing since the industrial revolution in the 18th century. The United Nations now estimates that 3.9 billion people live in urban centres. The rapid influx of residents is however not universal and the developed countries are already urban, but the big rise in urban population in the next 30 years is expected to be in Asia and Africa. Urbanization leads to many challenges for global health and the epidemiology of infectious diseases. New megacities can be incubators for new epidemics, and zoonotic diseases can spread in a more rapid manner and become worldwide threats. Adequate city planning and surveillance can be powerful tools to improve the global health and decrease the burden of communicable diseases.”

Please read complete article http://www.infectionecologyandepidemiology.net/index.php/iee/article/view/27060


Is a serious Emerging Disease Pathogen being under appreciated?
Parasites & Vectors 2015, 8:317 doi:10.1186/s13071-015-0920-4
Monday, June 22, 2015.

A One Health issue...

Is a serious Emerging Disease Pathogen being under appreciated?

A prominent and highly respected biomedical (comparative medicine) disease researcher says yes!

*Edward Breitschwerdt, DVM, DACVIM, Professor, Internal Medicine
Adjunct Professor of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center
Phone: 919.513.8277
Fax: 919.513.6464
Email:
ed_breitschwerdt@ncsu.edu - http://www.cvm.ncsu.edu/docs/personnel/breitschwerdt_ed.html

“From my perspective, it is time for a Bartonella tipping point whereby this emerging pathogen is accorded a higher national (United States) and international research priorities.”

Letter to the Editor of Parasites & Vectors Journal- Did Bartonella henselae contribute to the deaths of two veterinarians?

Parasites & Vectors 2015, 8:317 doi:10.1186/s13071-015-0920-4

Please read http://www.parasitesandvectors.com/content/8/1/317 and for more information about the disease “Bartonellosis” see http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/213169-overview

* Dr. Breitschwerdt, a veterinarian, is listed on the One Health Initiative website’s Supporters page http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php.


The OIE unveils the online version of its publication World Animal Health
The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)
Thursday, June 18, 2015.

The OIE unveils the online version of its publication World Animal Health

The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) is placing online its publication World Animal Health, a unique compilation of information on the world situation relating to animal diseases, including those transmissible to humans, available to all and updated on a daily basis.

Paris, 3 June 2015 – Published for over 30 years, World Animal Health provides an annual synthesis of information relating to at least the OIE’s 180 Member Countries, covering not only the animal diseases present on their respective territories, but also their relevant disease surveillance and control methods. It also provides data on animal populations and production figures.

Previously available in hard copy and updated once a year, World Animal Health, in its new web-based format, will now give access to information that is updated throughout the year and can be extracted in the form of Excel tables and easily disseminated.

The data contained in World Animal Heath are derived directly from the OIE World Animal Health System (WAHIS), which gathers information on the world situation relating to diseases of domestic and wild terrestrial and aquatic animals – including diseases transmissible to humans –, reported by OIE Member Countries as well as some non-member countries.

The only compilation of its kind, World Animal Health presents a synthesis of the animal disease information contained in all the reports from countries received on a permanent basis by the OIE, once the information has been verified and validated by the OIE’s World Animal Health Information and Analysis Department.

World Animal Health now makes it easier to consult and use the data made available via the online interface of WAHIS, which constitutes a comprehensive collection of the animal health data received and treated by the OIE.

http://www.oie.int/en/for-the-media/press-releases/detail/article/the-oie-unveils-the-online-version-of-its-publication-world-animal-health/


Further Spread of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza: The Big Picture
Center for Excellent for Zoonotic and Animal Diseases (CEEZAD) - News & Press Release - June 11, 2015
Saturday, June 13, 2015.

Center for Excellence for Zoonotic and Animal Diseases (CEEZAD) - News & Press Release - June 11, 2015

Further Spread of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza: The Big Picture

“Some 140 news outlets, including The International Business Times, The Times of India, Medical News Today in the United Kingdom and The Medical News in Australia, have now published information from the CEEZAD Press Release of May 26, 2015. ...”

Please read complete article www.ceezad.org/about/news.html

NOTE: CEEZAD recognizes the One Health concept http://www.ceezad.org/resources/links.html.


What factors might have led to the emergence of Ebola in West Africa?
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, Thursday 4 June 2015
Friday, June 12, 2015.

PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, Thursday 4 June 2015

What factors might have led to the emergence of Ebola in West Africa?

June 4, 2015  DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003652

Abstract

An Ebola outbreak of unprecedented scope emerged in West Africa in December 2013 and presently continues unabated in the countries of Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. Ebola is not new to Africa, and outbreaks have been confirmed as far back as 1976. The current West African Ebola outbreak is the largest ever recorded and differs dramatically from prior outbreaks in its duration, number of people affected, and geographic extent. The emergence of this deadly disease in West Africa invites many questions, foremost among these: why now, and why in West Africa? Here, we review the sociological, ecological, and environmental drivers that might have influenced the emergence of Ebola in this region of Africa and its spread throughout the region. Containment of the West African Ebola outbreak is the most pressing, immediate need. A comprehensive assessment of the drivers of Ebola emergence and sustained human-to-human transmission is also needed in order to prepare other countries for importation or emergence of this disease. Such assessment includes identification of country-level protocols and interagency policies for outbreak detection and rapid response, increased understanding of cultural and traditional risk factors within and between nations, delivery of culturally embedded public health education, and regional coordination and collaboration, particularly with governments and health ministries throughout Africa. Public health education is also urgently needed in countries outside of Africa in order to ensure that risk is properly understood and public concerns do not escalate unnecessarily. To prevent future outbreaks, coordinated, multiscale, early warning systems should be developed that make full use of these integrated assessments, partner with local communities in high-risk areas, and provide clearly defined response recommendations specific to the needs of each community. ...”

Key Learning Points

·         Significant political, social, and environmental changes have occurred in West Africa, likely contributing to the emergence of the most deadly Ebola outbreak in history.

·         Similarity in outbreak characteristics (including R0, symptoms, incubation time, and serial time) between West Africa and previous Ebola outbreaks suggests that there has not been any significant change in the virus affecting transmissibility.

·         Information collection and communication remain a challenge in resource-poor settings and specific strategies and tools will need to be developed to allow rapid identification and response within the context and constraints identified in the local environment.

·         Integrated approaches involving both human and animal health [“One Health”] must be developed that engage the research, law enforcement, and policy environments within these local settings.

Please read complete article:

http://journals.plos.org/plosntds/article?id=10.1371/journal.pntd.0003652

Note: Co-authors of this piece, Kathleen A. Alexander, DVM, PhD is listed on the One Health Initiative Supporters list http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php and Viriginia M. Dato, MD, MPH is a member of the One Health Initiative team’s Honorary Advisory Board http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/advBoard.php.


Why The Human Side Lags Behind in One Health
Veterinary Practice News – June 10, 2015
Thursday, June 11, 2015.

Veterinary Practice News – June 10, 2015

Why The Human Side Lags Behind in One Health

Veterinarians continue to lead real-world advances in the collaboration on human, animal and environmental well-being.

“Pioneers of the One Health movement to blend human, veterinary and environmental health are gaining respect, epidemic by epidemic, but capturing the attention of the human health care establishment remains a challenge.

“You have to take the long view,” acknowledged Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, of the One Health Initiative team. “It took people over a century to realize the significance of basic sanitation, and lots of countries don’t even have that.” ...”

Please read complete article http://www.veterinarypracticenews.com/Why-The-Human-Side-Lags-Behind-in-One-Health/


‘Surprising’ Discovery Made About Chronic Wasting Disease - New study shows that prions can bind to plants
Food Safety News
Tuesday, June 09, 2015.

Food Safety News

‘Surprising’ Discovery Made About Chronic Wasting Disease

New study shows that prions can bind to plants

By Cookson Beecher | June 1, 2015

“An infectious brain disease that has been killing deer, elk and moose both in the wild and on “captive farms” continues to stalk the land, expanding its domain to 23 states and two Canadian provinces since it was first identified in captive mule deer in a Colorado research facility in 1967.

Known as chronic wasting disease, or CWD, it has baffled scientists for decades. Where did it come from, and why is it spreading across the landscape? What health risks might it pose to humans who eat parts of infected animals? And can cattle get it from infected deer, elk, and moose, thus introducing it into the human food chain? ...”

Read more: http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2015/06/researchers-make-surprising-discovery-about-spread-of-chronic-wasting-disease/#.VW34IU1FAdU

 


The case for a ‘one health’ approach to combating vector-borne diseases
Infection Ecology and Epidemiology 2015, 5: 28132 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/iee.v5.28132
Saturday, June 06, 2015.

Infection Ecology & Epidemiology (EEE) – The One Health Journal (Sweden)

The case for a ‘one health’ approach to combating vector-borne diseases

Bonto Faburay, DVM, PhD, Research Assistant Professor* Print this article

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Department of Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA

Citation: Infection Ecology and Epidemiology 2015, 5: 28132 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/iee.v5.28132

“Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) account for 17% of the estimated global burden of all infectious diseases, and transmission has become increasingly ubiquitous with the largest risk zones in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. As a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans and livestock in pastoral and mixed farming communities in developing countries, VBDs reinforce the vicious cycle of poverty by limiting productivity and the ability to produce food or earn income to purchase food or medical services. Due to the influence of human activity on disease incidence and the direct and indirect impact on human health and livelihoods, VBDs are highly suited to ‘one health’ concept for combating infectious diseases. Increased human mobility, population growth, trade, and climate change constitute major risk factors for geographic expansion to new areas. ...”

Please read complete article: http://www.infectionecologyandepidemiology.net/index.php/iee/article/view/28132

Note: Dr. Faburay is listed in the One Health Initiative Supporters page http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php 


 
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