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Public Policy Drivers During Global Public Health Emergencies: Focus on Ebola
November 11, 2014 5:30 – 7:30 PM - Texas Tech University Law School - Lanier Auditorium
Wednesday, November 26, 2014.

Notable One Health Program…

 Public Policy Drivers During Global Public Health Emergencies: Focus on Ebola

Tuesday, November 11, 2014 5:30 – 7:30 PM - Texas Tech University Law School - Lanier Auditorium

See Program Flyer on PDF attachment

Facilitator

Annette Sobel, MD, MS - Associate Professor of Medical Education; Executive for Critical Infrastructure Protection and Health Security Initiatives, TTUHSC and TTU

Please watch and listen to the recorded program: http://mediaservices.law.ttu.edu/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=4a4717cc-5645-4823-a7b1-cab75bf505a9

Permission to post link to this recorded link on One Health Initiative website granted by Dr. Annette Sobel on November 24, 2014.

Dr. Sobel is a longstanding physician One Health Supporter/Advocate http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php. 

Gary Simpson, MD, PhD, MSc(Oxon), MPH, FACP, FIDSA, FASAM - Infectious Disease Specialist - New Mexico, a participant speaker, is a physician member of the One Health Initiative team’s Honorary Advisory Board http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/advBoard.php.

Ronald Warner, DVM, MPVM, PhD – Director - Travelmed Clinic; Professor - Dept. of Family and Community Medicine, TTUHSC, a participant speaker, is a longstanding veterinarian One Health Supporter/Advocate http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php. 

 


One Heath: UC Davis (USA) awarded $100 million to lead program to predict and prevent pandemic threats
UC Davis (USA)
Monday, November 24, 2014.

One Heath: UC Davis (USA) awarded $100 million to lead program to predict and prevent pandemic threats

“The United States Agency for International Development has awarded up to $100 million for the second phase of the PREDICT project based at the University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine. PREDICT is part of the Emerging Pandemic Threats, or EPT, program — an unprecedented international campaign to rapidly detect and respond to emerging viruses such as Ebola and SARS that move among people, wildlife, and livestock. …”

“…The consortium is united by their belief in the One Health approach, which employs the knowledge that the health of animals, people and the environment are inextricably linked to solve global health problems. …”

Please read all at http://news.ucdavis.edu/search/news_detail.lasso?id=11096


One Health Book Notice information…“Confronting Emerging Zoonoses - The One Health Paradigm”
See: http://www.springer.com/978-4-431-55119-5
Friday, November 21, 2014.

One Health Book Notice information…

“Confronting Emerging Zoonoses - The One Health Paradigm”

http://www.springer.com/978-4-431-55119-5

This book is now published online: If you click the “Read this book on SpringerLink” icon on this site, you will find the eBook on the SpringerLink platform.

The print version is still in preparation…notice will appear on this website when print version is published and available.


One Health – U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Thursday, November 20, 2014.

One HealthU.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The One Health concept recognizes that the health of humans is connected to the health of animals and the environment.

CDC uses a One Health approach by working with physicians, ecologists, and veterinarians to monitor and control public health threats. We do this by learning about how diseases spread among people, animals, and the environment.

SEE: http://www.cdc.gov/onehealth/ and related links http://www.cdc.gov/onehealth/resources/related.html

 

·Rift Valley Fever Virus vaccine

Preventing disease in humans and livestock.Learn More »


The Contributions of Pesticides to Pest Management in Meeting the Global Need for Food Production by 2050 - A One Health issue...
Council for Agricultural Science and Technology, Ames, Iowa
Monday, November 17, 2014.

An important One Health issue…a One Health approach, i.e. transdisciplinary collaborations is desirable!

 

The Contributions of Pesticides to Pest Management in Meeting the Global Need for Food Production by 2050

 

"You Can't Eat What Doesn't Grow"

 

November 17, 2014...Council for Agricultural Science and Technology, Ames, Iowa.

All agree that the world needs a safe, plentiful supply of food, and most acknowledge that global demand will grow along with the expanding population. This peer-reviewed report looks at how pesticides fit into this equation. After a data-driven examination of past developments and current uses, the authors conclude that a safe, thoughtful integration of pesticides is essential if we hope to attain an abundant food supply for a hungry world.  

 

 

 

The term "pesticides" has been around for centuries, and it describes many different chemicals. The term has also--at times--been maligned and misunderstood. The authors of this publication use extensive data and provide clear examples to explain that pesticide use in agriculture has

  • increased crop yield and quality,
  • lessened the workload of pest management, and
  • improved the prospects for long-term sustainable food production.

This paper gives a brief background about the use of pesticides and then a thorough look at why they have become popular and widely used. Intelligent use of pesticides has led to crop management that is more efficient, sustainable, and productive. For example, the authors produce evidence that fungicide use has helped stem the curse of soybean rust, aided with the prevention of fusarium head blight in wheat, and increased farmer income.

 

Along with better pest management, pesticides have helped with the development of improved agronomic practices such as no till, low till, higher plant densities, increased yields, and efficient use of water and nutrients. The authors point out that in comparison to hand weeding, herbicide use is less expensive and more effective. "By substituting for cultivation, herbicide use leads to lower fuel use, less carbon emissions, less soil erosion, and less water use."

 

Of course there are controversies and challenges. The authors indicate that concerns exist regarding water, soil, and atmospheric resources, as well as the need for safety during application and food processing. Regulations, testing, worker training, and other safeguards are factors that mitigate unwanted effects.

 

More than 800 million people in the world are food insecure, and the amount of crop yield lost each year to pests could run upwards of 30%. But many experts are optimistic about developments involving safe, efficient production methods occurring around the globe. When pesticides are effectively applied and integrated into a comprehensive approach, the world is better able to provide food for the 9 billion humans on earth in 2050.

 

Task Force Authors:

Stephen C. Weller (Chair), Purdue University

Albert K. Culbreath, University of Georgia

Leonard Gianessi, CropLife Foundation

Larry D. Godfrey, University of California-Davis

 

CAST Issue Paper 55 and its companion Ag quickCAST are available online at the CAST website, www.cast-science.org, along with many of CAST's other scientific publications. All CAST Issue Papers, Commentaries, and Ag quickCASTs are FREE.

 

About CAST

 

CAST is an international consortium of scientific and professional societies, companies, and nonprofit organizations. It assembles, interprets, and communicates credible science-based information regionally, nationally, and internationally to legislators, regulators, policymakers, the media, the private sector, and the public.

 

Contacts for this Issue Paper

 

Dr. Stephen C. Weller-Phone: 765-494-1333; E-mail: weller@purdue.edu  

Ms. Linda M. Chimenti-Phone: 515-292-2125, ext. 231; E-mail: lchimenti@cast-science.org  


The Global One Health Paradigm: Challenges and Opportunities for Tackling Infectious Diseases at the Human, Animal, and Environment Interface in Low-Resource Settings
Gebreyes WA, Dupouy-Camet J, Newport MJ, Oliveira CJB, Schlesinger LS, et al. (2014) The Global One Health Paradigm: Challenges and Opportunities for Tackling Infectious Diseases at the Human, Animal, and Environment Interface in Low-Resource Settings. PL
Friday, November 14, 2014.

“…The aim of this review is to highlight advances in key zoonotic disease areas and the One Health capacity needs…”

The Global One Health Paradigm: Challenges and Opportunities for Tackling Infectious Diseases at the Human, Animal, and Environment Interface in Low-Resource Settings

http://www.plosntds.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pntd.0003257

Citation: Gebreyes WA, Dupouy-Camet J, Newport MJ, Oliveira CJB, Schlesinger LS, et al. (2014) The Global One Health Paradigm: Challenges and Opportunities for Tackling Infectious Diseases at the Human, Animal, and Environment Interface in Low-Resource Settings. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 8(11): e3257. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0003257

Abstract

“Zoonotic infectious diseases have been an important concern to humankind for more than 10,000 years. Today, approximately 75% of newly emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) are zoonoses that result from various anthropogenic, genetic, ecologic, socioeconomic, and climatic factors. These interrelated driving forces make it difficult to predict and to prevent zoonotic EIDs. Although significant improvements in environmental and medical surveillance, clinical diagnostic methods, and medical practices have been achieved in the recent years, zoonotic EIDs remain a major global concern, and such threats are expanding, especially in less developed regions. The current Ebola epidemic in West Africa is an extreme stark reminder of the role animal reservoirs play in public health and reinforces the urgent need for globally operationalizing a One Health approach. The complex nature of zoonotic diseases and the limited resources in developing countries are a reminder that the need for implementation of Global One Health in low-resource settings is crucial. The Veterinary Public Health and Biotechnology (VPH-Biotec) Global Consortium launched the International Congress on Pathogens at the Human-Animal Interface (ICOPHAI) in order to address important challenges and needs for capacity building. The inaugural ICOPHAI (Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2011) and the second congress (Porto de Galinhas, Brazil, 2013) were unique opportunities to share and discuss issues related to zoonotic infectious diseases worldwide. In addition to strong scientific reports in eight thematic areas that necessitate One Health implementation, the congress identified four key capacity-building needs: (1) development of adequate science-based risk management policies, (2) skilled-personnel capacity building, (3) accredited veterinary and public health diagnostic laboratories with a shared database, and (4) improved use of existing natural resources and implementation. The aim of this review is to highlight advances in key zoonotic disease areas and the One Health capacity needs.”


One Health Postdoctoral Associate Position Studying Zoonotic Diseases, Mongolia
Professor Gregory C. Gray at gregory.gray@duke.edu
Wednesday, November 12, 2014.

One Health Postdoctoral Associate Position Studying Zoonotic Diseases, Mongolia

Duke University’s Division of Infectious Diseases invites applications from US citizens for a very unique two-year postdoctoral associate position, who will, with a team of two other postdoctoral associates from Mongolia, design and apply innovative solutions to Mongolia’s zoonotic disease problems. The trainee will receive comprehensive instruction in the concept of One Health, which seeks to utilize cross-cutting interdisciplinary strategies to solve complex public health problems.

This postdoctoral training program will occur in two phases. Phase I will involve 2 months of initial training at Duke University (May 13, 2015 – July 12, 2014), where the team will receive structured One Health didactic training (One Health Training Program), as well as training in ethical conduct of human and animal research. Then, the team will work closely with an advisory committee to develop a pilot study of an innovative solution for one complex zoonotic disease problem in Mongolia. Once a research plan is approved by the advisory committee, the team will begin Phase II, where they will work in Mongolia on the zoonotic disease problem (July 2015 – April 30th 2017).

While in Mongolia, the team will work with Mongolian government officials to conduct the study, which will likely consist of considerable travel to rural parts of Mongolia for field collections.  While the postdoctoral team will be closely monitored, the team will be strongly encouraged to conduct independent team problem solving.  After the team completes their study, they will be asked to transfer their knowledge to regional public health, veterinary and environmental health professionals throughout Mongolia, as well as translate scientific findings into prevention practices or products that will help to reduce the burden of zoonotic diseases among pastoral people worldwide.

Applicants should be a US citizen and have a doctoral degree in public health, veterinary medicine, environmental health, medicine, epidemiology, microbiology, entomology, or a related field. This two-year fellowship includes annual support with a Kirschtein-NRSA award stipend ($42,000), round-trip airfare to Mongolia, research office support, plus cost-reimbursable living expenses (up to $10,000/yr). 

Duke University is a comprehensive research institution that includes a remarkably wide range of academic departments and programs (www.duke.edu) and is recognized as one of the premier research institutions in the U.S. Duke is uniquely positioned to provide excellent opportunities for collaboration with colleagues across a variety of disciplines.

Applicants should send their CV with a cover letter explaining how they fit this program, as well as references (names and contact) to Professor Gregory C. Gray at gregory.gray@duke.edu by January 15th, 2014.

 

Please see attachment.

For more information regarding the awarded NIH grant supporting this position click here.


First European guidelines on syndromic surveillance in human and animal health published
Eurosurveillance, Volume 19, Issue 41, 16 October 2014
Saturday, November 08, 2014.

Eurosurveillance, Volume 19, Issue 41, 16 October 2014

First European guidelines on syndromic surveillance in human and animal health published

 A Hulth ()1

1.      Public Health Agency of Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden

Citation style for this article: Hulth A. First European guidelines on syndromic surveillance in human and animal health published. Euro Surveill. 2014;19(41):pii=20927. Available online: http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=20927
Date of submission:

“On 11 October 2014, the first European guidelines on syndromic surveillance in human and animal health, the ‘Triple-S guidelines for designing and implementing a syndromic surveillance system’, were published [1].The guidelines are one of the main outcomes of the European Union (EU) –funded project ‘Triple-S’, which main aim has been to increase the European capacity for near-real time surveillance and monitoring of health-related events in the animal and the human health sectors. …”

See http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=20927


Health Initiative Targets Exotic Pet Keepers
TONBRIDGE, England, November 6, 2014 /PRNewswire/ --
Thursday, November 06, 2014.

Health Initiative Targets Exotic Pet Keepers

TONBRIDGE, England, November 6, 2014 /PRNewswire/ --

“In response to the burgeoning exotic pet trade, and subsequent increased risk to human health, the Emergent Disease Foundation, One Health Initiative, Worldwide Veterinary Service, and UNISON have collaborated in the launch of a new leaflet containing important hygiene measures concerning exotic pets. It is hoped that the leaflet, entitled  Exotic pets: Reducing the of risk of human infection will be distributed via medical centres, local authorities, schools, veterinary clinics and pet shops to help raise vital awareness, and minimise illness. The leaflets are available free of charge.

The advice contained in the leaflet is taken from an independent scientific paper entitled 'A review of captive exotic animal-linked zoonoses' published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Environmental Health Research. A diverse range of species is now available as 'pets' and they carry with them an array of exotic germs. An unfortunate animal may be transported halfway round the world and straight into someone's living room with the family having no idea of the risks it may pose. Many of these germs can persist on surfaces such as walls, door handles and clothes. Therefore, although hand-washing is standard advice and very important, it cannot guarantee that germs won't spread around the home or be passed directly or indirectly to others. Those particularly at risk are children under five, the elderly, pregnant women and anyone who is immunocompromised. …”

Please read entire press release http://www.prnewswire.co.uk/news-releases/health-initiative-targets-exotic-pet-keepers-281702201.html


Education Key to Food Safety in 21st Century
UC Davis (USA) Western Institute for Food Safety and Security
Sunday, November 02, 2014.

One Health = UC Davis (USA) Western Institute for Food Safety and Security

Education Key to Food Safety in 21st Century

This entry was posted in Food Safety International Outreach on October 31, 2014 by Chris Brunner.

At the One Health Food Safety Symposium held October 23 -24, in Nanjing, China, academia and government discussed the importance of a global education system to address the challenges of food safety in the 21st century.

The two day symposium, co-sponsored by the University of California, Davis, and Nanjing Agricultural University, (NAU), was associated with the million dollar planning and implementation project between the two universities for the establishment of a One Health Center focused on food safety at NAU.

Dean Michael Lairmore, School of Veterinary Medicine, led the delegation from UC Davis including Rob Atwill, Bennie Osburn, Xunde Li, Cheryl Scott, and Heather Johnson from the Western Institute for Food Safety and Security, (WIFSS), Jim Cullor, director of the Dairy Food Safety Laboratory, and Huaijun Zhou from the department of Animal Science. …

Please read more http://www.wifss.ucdavis.edu/?p=7908


 
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