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Earn MPH degree in Biosecurity & Disaster Preparedness
SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY (USA) – College for Public Health and Social Justice
Saturday, December 03, 2016.

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY (USA) – College for Public Health and Social Justice

 

Graduate Level Degrees & Programs

Earn MPH degree in Biosecurity & Disaster Preparedness

"As the nation’s first Master of Public Health degree in biosecurity & disaster preparedness, the Institute for Biosecurity programs offer excellence in education and experience for those wanting a broad-based public health approach to this emerging discipline. The online format allows students to earn their degree while working, and without relocating."

Please see attachment and http://www.slu.edu/public-health-social-justice/concentrations/bsdp.php

Provided by:

CAROLE R. BASKIN, DVM, MSC, CPIA

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, INSTITUTE FOR BIOSECURITY

DIRECTOR, MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAMS  CHAIR, STANDING DIVERSITY

COMMITTEE  IACUC DEPUTY CHAIR

COLLEGE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH & SOCIAL JUSTICE

http://www.slu.edu/public-health-social-justice/concentrations/bsdp.php

Environmental & Occupational Health

Saint Louis University (USA)

3545 Lafayette Room 464St Louis, MO  63104

Phone: 314-977-3247    Fax: 314-977-3234

http://biosecurity.slu.edu/faculty.html


One Health EcoHealth 2016 congress to bring global medical experts to Melbourne [Australia]
EcoHealth
Friday, December 02, 2016.

One Health EcoHealth 2016 congress to bring global medical experts to Melbourne [Australia]

December 3-7, 2016

SEE: http://www.cimmagazine.com/melbourne-to-host-medical-merger/


World Medical Association Resolution on Collaboration between Human and Veterinary Medicine
Adopted by the 59th WMA General Assembly, Seoul, Korea, October 2008
Thursday, December 01, 2016.

World Medical Association Resolution on Collaboration between Human and Veterinary Medicine

Adopted by the 59th WMA General Assembly, Seoul, Korea, October 2008

http://www.wma.net/en/30publications/10policies/v2/index.html

The majority of the emerging infectious diseases, including the bioterrorist agents, are zoonoses. Zoonoses can, by definition, infect both animals and humans. By their very nature, the fields of human medicine and veterinary medicine are complementary and synergistic in confronting, controlling and preventing zoonotic diseases from infecting across species.

Collaboration and communication between human medicine and veterinary medicine have been limited in recent decades, yet the challenges of the 21st Century demand that these two professions work together.

An initiative, often called the "One Health" initiative, is being developed to improve the lives of all species-human and animal-through the integration of human and veterinary medicine. (1) "One Health" aims to promote and implement close meaningful collaboration and communication between human medicine, veterinary medicine and all allied health scientists with the goal of hastening human public health efficacy as well as advanced health care options for humans (and animals) via comparative biomedical research.

The World Medical Association (WMA) recognizes the ways in which animals and animal care may affect human health and disease through its own current policies, particularly its statements on Animal Use in Biomedical Research, Resistance to Antimicrobial Drugs and Avian and Pandemic Influenza. The WMA already works with other health professions including dentists, nurses and pharmacists though the World Health Professions Alliance.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the World Medical Association:

  • Support collaboration between human and veterinary medicine;
  • Support the concept of joint educational efforts between human medical and veterinary medical schools;
  • Encourage joint efforts in clinical care through the assessment, treatment, and prevention of cross-species disease transmission;
  • Support cross-species disease surveillance and control efforts in public health, particularly the identification of early disease and outbreak trends;
  • Support the need for joint efforts in the development, integration and evaluation of screening tools, diagnostic methods, medicines, vaccines, surveillance systems and policies for the prevention, management and control of zoonotic diseases;
  • Engage in a dialogue with the World Veterinary Association to discuss strategies for enhancing collaboration between human and veterinary medical professions in medical education, clinical care, public health, and biomedical research.
  • Encourage National Medical Associations to engage in a dialogue with their veterinary counterparts to discuss strategies for enhancing collaboration between human and veterinary medical professions within their own countries.


One Health training, research, and outreach in North America
Infection Ecology and Epidemiology 2016, 6: 33680 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/iee.v6.33680
Tuesday, November 29, 2016.

REVIEW ARTICLE

One Health training, research, and outreach in North America

Cheryl Stroud, DVM, PhD1*, Bruce Kaplan, DVM2, Jenae E. Logan, MScGH3,5 and Gregory C. Gray, MD, MPH, FIDSA3

1One Health Commission, Apex, NC; 2One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono Team, Sarasota, FL, USA; 3Division of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine and Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA10

Citation: Infection Ecology and Epidemiology 2016, 6: 33680 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/iee.v6.33680

Published November 29, 2016 – SEE http://www.infectionecologyandepidemiology.net/index.php/iee/article/view/33680

Infection Ecology & Epidemiology – the One Health Journal

About the Journal: http://www.infectionecologyandepidemiology.net/index.php/iee

... publishes original and cross-disciplinary research from across medical and ecological disciplines engaged in describing the complexity of zoonotic infections and the interface between wild and domestic animals, and humans.

Learn more

 http://www.infectionecologyandepidemiology.net/public/site/images/veronicas/OneHealth2.jpg

The One Health concept is a global strategy for expanding interdisciplinary collaborations and communications in all aspects of health care for humans, animals, and the environment. The synergism 40 achieved will advance health care for the 21st century and beyond by accelerating biomedical research discoveries, enhancing public health efficacy, expanding the scientific knowledge base, and improving medical education and clinical care. When properly implemented, it will help 45 protect and save millions of lives in our present and future generations (1). ...

1. One Health Initiative autonomous pro bono team. About the One Health Initiative. Available from: http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/about.php [cited 3 September 2016].

Please read full article at http://www.infectionecologyandepidemiology.net/index.php/iee/article/view/33680

*Direct Correspondence to: Dr. Cheryl Stroud, Executive Director, One Health Commission, P.O. Box 972, Apex, NC 27523, USA, Email: cstroud@onehealthcommission.org.


One Health training approach worldwide...
INFECTION ECOLOGY & EPIDEMIOLOGY – The One Health Journal
Tuesday, November 29, 2016.

INFECTION ECOLOGY & EPIDEMIOLOGY – The One Health Journal

One Health training approach worldwide...

http://www.infectionecologyandepidemiology.net/index.php/iee#tabMostRecentArticles


Owned and unowned free roaming dogs..A One Health problem
World Veterinary Association (WVA) Fact Sheet
Monday, November 28, 2016.

World Veterinary Association Fact Sheet:

http://www.worldvet.org/uploads/news/docs/fact_sheet_on_unowned_dogs-nov24-2016.pdf

 

“Free-roaming dogs can act as a public nuisance as well as creating a One Health1 problem”

Owned and unowned free roaming dogs..

ANIMAL ISSUES - ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES - HUMAN ISSUES

Learn: Why is it a problem? How can this problem be addressed? How can you help?

Provided by:

 

Dr. Zeev Noga
Veterinary Policy Officer

 

cid:part1.00000700.01020502@worldvet.org
World Veterinary Association (WVA)
Avenue de Tervueren 12
B-1040 Brussels, Belgium
Tel: +32 (0) 2 533 70 22

zeev_noga@worldvet.org
secretariat@worldvet.org
http://www.worldvet.org

 


“One Health: Recreating the future”
Canadian Cattlemen – The Beef Magazine: by Dr. Ron Clark
Friday, November 25, 2016.

Canadian Cattlemen – The Beef Magazine

Published: November 24, 2016

“One Health: Recreating the future” https://twitter.com/CanCattlemen/status/801938564112060416

 


Bacterial canine vector-borne zoonotic diseases in “One Health” concept
International Journal of One Health - George Valiakos, DVM, MSc, PhD
Tuesday, November 22, 2016.

Review (Published online: 20-11-2016)

Bacterial canine vector-borne zoonotic diseases in “One Health” concept - George Valiakos, DVM, MSc, PhD

International Journal of One Health, 2: 58-68

Abstract l PDF

http://www.onehealthjournal.org/Vol.2/9.pdf

Abstract

Canine vector-borne diseases constitute a large group of diseases transmitted by arthropods with worldwide distribution. A wide range of bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents that are transmitted by vectors cause disease to dogs, many of which can also affect humans and thus have an important zoonotic potential. Bacterial agents that are transmitted by vectors have been considered less important than viral or parasitic agents and are not commonly discussed in companion animal practice. However, close contact between pet animals and people offers favorable conditions for transmission of these bacteria. Many of these diseases have become a focus of interest for scientists in recent years. Increase in reservoir abundance, climate change, changing habitat structure, socio-political changes, and imports of dogs for welfare reasons and trade as well as traveling are considered to be potential factors for the pathogens and vectors introduction into new areas. Apart from, the veterinary aspect of these diseases, domestic dogs could play a central epidemiological role in the transmission of bacterial agents to humans, acting as reservoirs and sentinels, a circumstance that requires a One Health approach. This review highlights the most important of these bacterial agents, presenting updated current knowledge with special reference to treatment approach and One Health aspect.


One Health and cancer: A comparative study of human and canine cancers in Nairobi
Published in INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ONE HEALTH
Sunday, November 20, 2016.

Notable One Health comparative medicine human and canine CANCER studies (from Kenya) ...

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ONE HEALTH

Open access and peer reviewed journal on Human, Animal and Environmental health

 

Research (Published online: November 19, 2016)  http://www.onehealthjournal.org/Vol.2/8.html

 

8. One Health and cancer: A comparative study of human and canine cancers in Nairobi - Nyariaro Kelvin Momanyi, Rugutt Anne Korir and Riungu Erastus Mutiga

International Journal of One Health, 2: 42-57

 

 

  doi: 10.14202/IJOH.2016.42-57 or see http://www.onehealthjournal.org/Vol.2/8.pdf to read complete article.

 

Nyariaro Kelvin Momanyi: Department of Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Nairobi, Kenya; Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies and The Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, UK; momanyink@gmail.com

Rugutt Anne Korir: Cancer Registry Unit, Centre for Clinical Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Kenya; annkorir@yahoo.com

Riungu Erastus Mutiga: Department of Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Nairobi, Kenya; mutigar@yahoo.com

 

Received: 06-07-2016, Accepted: 21-10-2016, Published online: 19-11-2016

 

Corresponding author: Nyariaro Kelvin Momanyi, e-mail: momanyink@gmail.com


Citation: Momanyi NK, Korir RA, Mutiga RE. One Health and cancer: A comparative study of human and canine cancers in Nairobi. Int J One Health 2016;2:42-57.


Abstract


Aim: Recent trends in comparative animal and human research inform us that collaborative research plays a key role in deciphering and solving cancer challenges. Globally, cancer is a devastating diagnosis with an increasing burden in both humans and dogs and ranks as the number three killer among humans in Kenya. This study aimed to provide comparative information on cancers affecting humans and dogs in Nairobi, Kenya.

Materials and Methods: Dog data collection was by cancer case finding from five veterinary clinics and two diagnostic laboratories, whereas the human dataset was from the Nairobi Cancer Registry covering the period 2002-2012. The analysis was achieved using IBM SPSS Statistics® v.20 (Dog data) and CanReg5 (human data). The human population was estimated from the Kenya National Census, whereas the dog population was estimated from the human using a human:dog ratio of 4.1:1.

Results: A total of 15,558 human and 367 dog cancer cases were identified. In humans, females had higher cancer cases 8993 (an age-standardized rate of 179.3 per 100,000) compared to 6565 in males (122.1 per 100,000). This order was reversed in dogs where males had higher cases 198 (14.9 per 100,000) compared to 169 (17.5 per 100,000) in females. The incident cancer cases increased over the 11-year study period in both species. Common cancers affecting both humans and dogs were: Prostate (30.4, 0.8), the respiratory tract (8.3, 1.3), lymphoma (5.6, 1.4), and liver and biliary tract (6.3, 0.5), whereas, in females, they were: Breast (44.5, 3.6), lip, oral cavity, and pharynx (8.8, 0.6), liver and biliary tract (6.5, 1.2), and lymphoma (6.0, 0.6), respectively, per 100,000.

Conclusion: The commonality of some of the cancers in both humans and dogs fortifies that it may be possible to use dogs as models and sentinels in studying human cancers in Kenya and Africa. We further infer that developing joint animal human cancer registries and integrated cancer surveillance systems may lead to accelerated detection of the risks of cancer in Africa.

 

Footnote: The One Health Initiative team strongly supports and encourages all One Health Initiative website readers to consider following and reading INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ONE HEALTH http://www.onehealthjournal.org/.

Bruce Kaplan, DVM

Contents Manager/Editor One Health Initiative Website

Co-Founder One Health Initiative team/website

http://goo.gl/KujQkP

4748 Hamlets Grove Drive

Sarasota, Florida 34235

E-mail:  bkapdvm@verizon.net

Phone/fax: 941-351-5014

www.onehealthinitiative.com

One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono Team:

Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP ▪ Bruce Kaplan, DVM ▪

Thomas P. Monath, MD ▪ Lisa A. Conti, DVM, MPH


One Health Journal - Publication Recommendation(s)
PUBLISHER ELSEVIER
Saturday, November 19, 2016.

Elsevier

Open access
Read the most recent One Health research

 

The One Health Initiative team strongly supports and encourages all One Health Initiative website

readers to consider the following information provided below about the One Health Journal http://www.journals.elsevier.com/one-health/.

 

Bruce Kaplan, DVM

Contents Manager/Editor One Health Initiative Website

Co-Founder One Health Initiative team/website

http://goo.gl/KujQkP

4748 Hamlets Grove Drive

Sarasota, Florida 34235

E-mail:  bkapdvm@verizon.net

Phone/fax: 941-351-5014

www.onehealthinitiative.com

 

One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono Team:

Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP ▪ Bruce Kaplan, DVM ▪

Thomas P. Monath, MD ▪ Lisa A. Conti, DVM, MPH

More recent articles

 

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Keep up to speed with the latest One Health research by reading Elsevier’s open access journal One Health, which was launched in 2015 as the official journal of the One Health Platform foundation.

Here are some very recently published articles from One Health: all papers are open access and free to read and download.

We hope you enjoy reading these new articles and consider submitting your latest discovering to One Health.

More recent articles

With best regards,

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Prof. Albert Osterhaus and Prof. John Mackenzie

Co-Editors-in-Chief, One Health

One Health's Editor-in-Chief Prof. John Mackenzie and Associate Editor Prof. Martyn Jeggo are chairing the organizing committee of the upcoming One Health EcoHealth 2016, 3-7 December in Melbourne, Australia. View the conference program.

Printed journal copies will be available at the One Health Platform booth.

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One Health is an open access journal. Find out more.

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