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33rd World Veterinary Congress "One Health, New Wave" - Aug 27-31, 2017, Incheon, KOREA - Thursday, June 01, 2017

http://wvc2017korea.com/image/logo.gif

SEE http://wvc2017korea.com/


Prominent U.S. Tuberculosis Expert and One Health Leader Dies - Saturday, May 13, 2017

Prominent U.S. Tuberculosis Expert and One Health Leader Dies

Dr. Charles O. Thoen, a veterinarian internationally recognized for his extensive knowledge and expertise in the scientific field of tuberculosis and an avid One Health leader/advocate died unexpectedly Monday, May 8, 2017.  Notably, Dr. Thoen earned his PhD degree following a fellowship in microbiology research at the renowned Mayo Clinic graduate school of medicine (1968-1971): University of Minnesota.  He had previously received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree from U of M in 1961.

Dr. Thoen was a valued friend and strong ally of the One Health Initiative Autonomous Pro Bono team.  This brilliant, kind and decent man shall be sorely missed by his friends, colleagues and the global public health scientific world.

A fitting in memoriam to him and for his family, is the following beautifully prepared pertinent article:

Iowa State University – College of Veterinary Medicine https://vetmed.iastate.edu/story/charles-thoen

 

A Man Among Beasts

Dr. Charles Thoen

Editor's Note: It is with great sadness that we report the death of Dr. Charles Thoen, professor of veterinary microbiology and preventive medicine, on Monday, May 8, 2017.

During his half-century- long career in veterinary medicine, Dr. Charles Thoen has worked with food- producing animals, companion animals, nonhuman primates, elk, buffalo and even elephants. Early in his career he was a veterinary medical epidemiologist for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). He later chaired the department of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine at Iowa State University, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease Scientific Committee on Tuberculosis in Animals, and World Health Organization Committee on Animal Tuberculosis.

He’s been a consultant to the Smithsonian Institution, National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Pan American Health Organization, National Aquarium in Baltimore, International Elephant Foundation, and agricultural departments in the United States and countries including Egypt, New Zealand, South Africa, Colombia and Serbia.

Dr. Thoen has served as president of the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society and was invited by the World Veterinary Association to provide content for its educational portal on tuberculosis (TB) in animals and humans. In 2014 he received the Distinguished Research Alumnus award from the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine for his accomplishments on TB and clinically significant pathogenic mycobacteria. He’s been an editor of seven textbooks on infectious disease that are used by scientists worldwide.

He credits his training at Mayo Clinic for providing him with research skills, and a childhood pet for sparking his lifelong interest in infectious diseases in animals and humans.

Dr. Thoen grew up on a farm in Harmony−Lanesboro, Minnesota. When his dog, Trixie, contracted an infectious disease and died, the 10-year-old boy wanted to learn more about what killed his pet. He talked to the local veterinarian and “was hooked,” he says.

Dr. Thoen recently edited the third edition of Zoonotic Tuberculosis: Mycobacterium bovis and Other Pathogenic Mycobacteria, a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art control and elimination of infections caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in animals and humans.

Intermingling of the species

“Infectious diseases can be transmitted from animals to humans, and from humans back to animals,” says Dr. Thoen. TB in particular causes disease in humans, elephants and several nonhuman primates. He says this information is especially important because TB is a re-emerging disease in both humans and animals worldwide and is a risk when they intermingle.

“Advanced TB is highly contagious and a significant concern to public health officials,” says Dr. Thoen. “Molecular techniques can trace outbreaks, including genotyping the TB organisms to identify strains and determine if isolates from human patients are similar to those of animals they were exposed to — or vice versa. If the isolates are the same, we can suspect transmission from one species to another, which helps identify the source of infection.”

Employees at animal parks and animal training centers have contracted the disease from elephants and primates. TB isn’t common among U.S. cattle but does occur in cattle imported from Mexico, exposing domestic cattle to the disease.

“Suspected animals are tested, but they only shed the organism in advanced stages of disease, so tests have limitations,” he says. “Public health officials are very concerned about animal-to-human transmission. People who come in contact with elephants may be at risk of contracting TB. Infected animals that expel air in proximity to people can infect them. Some studies show that 13 percent of captive elephants are infected with TB.”

Elephant man

When TB was first diagnosed in captive elephants in 1996, Dr. Thoen worked with a national group of elephant owners and the USDA to set up guidelines for testing, treatment and monitoring the disease. It was the start of 20 years of working with elephants. Some of his trainees became pioneers in the process of collecting samples for testing from the inside of the animals’ trunks — similar to a sputum sample. His team also determined the drug treatment protocols for elephants infected with TB.

“Initially the drug is given orally in grape juice, but elephants quickly lose interest in it,” he says. “We developed a suppository pack, which is now the standard treatment for uncooperative elephants.”

Costly treatment — in dollars and death

Some strains of TB in both humans and animals are resistant to two or more first-line drugs, and others are resistant to multiple drugs. The cost of treating TB is considerable. According to Dr. Thoen, in humans it’s $20,000 for a normal strain of TB and $135,000 to $400,000 for drug- resistant strains, with no guarantee — drug-resistant cases are often fatal. Treating infected animals is just as costly — $100,000 over 18 months for an elephant and as much as $400,000 if it is extensively drug-resistant.

“When an outbreak occurs in other animal populations, we don’t treat the disease,” says Dr. Thoen. “Instead, we remove the animals from the population and do follow- up tests for three and five or more years in those who were exposed.”

Dr. Thoen points out that when TB occurs in developing countries, it’s often not treated in humans, let alone animals, due to the high cost, which contributes to the spread of the disease. Some experts fear TB in animals could lead to the extinction of endangered species.

Dr. Thoen is an advocate for the One Health initiative and has authored content on its educational portal. One Health recognizes that human health, animal health and the environment are inextricably linked and encourages worldwide interdisciplinary collaboration in health care for humans, animals and the environment to defend the health and well-being of all species.

“Tuberculosis doesn’t know if it’s in an animal or a human and doesn’t care who it infects next,” he says. “We need better diagnostic tests and procedures.”

Reprinted from Mayo Clinic Alumni Magazine, Issue 3, pp 28 to 30.  2016. electronic Alumni magazine


SECOND ANNUAL “ONE HEALTH DAY” PLANNED BY THREE INTERNATIONAL ONE HEALTH GROUPS - November 3, 2017 - Monday, April 03, 2017

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                

 

3 April2017      For Immediate Release

 

Contact(s):        Peter Costa, +1 984 500 8593 (USA), pcosta@onehealthcommission.org

                              Chris Vanlangendonck, +32 475 81 38 59 (Belgium), c.vanlangendonck@onehealthplatform.com

 

 

SECOND ANNUAL “ONE HEALTH DAY” PLANNED BY THREE INTERNATIONAL ONE HEALTH GROUPS

3 NOVEMBER 2017

2016 ONE HEALTH DAY STUDENT COMPETITION WINNERS ANNOUNCEMENT

The first edition of the global One Health Day, held on 3 November 2016, generated over 150 events in over 35 countries engaging approximately 17,000 participants. Officially launched in April 2016 by three leading international One Health groups, the One Health Commission, the One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono Team, and the One Health Platform Foundation, this initiative has grown into an annual, sustainable platform for One Health supporters around the world.

Today, the three leading global partners launch promotion of the 2017 annual One Health Day campaign, calling upon individuals and groups from around the world to implement One Health educational projects and awareness events under the auspices of One Health Day. Regional One Health Day Spokespersons in Africa, Asia, Oceania, the Middle East, Europe and the Americas will continue to liaise with project teams in their respective regions, while a network of One Health Day Country Ambassadors works within their countries to encourage creation of inspiring events. Anyone, from academia to government to corporate to private individuals can plan and implement a One Health Day Event. The events do not have to fall right on November 3. All events should be registered on the webpage to be promoted on the One Health Day website and represented on the global One Health Day Events map.  Student groups from all disciplines can compete for cash prizes and global recognition. Participating teams can have the One Health Day logo translated into a language of their choice. All promotional materials are freely downloadable from the One Health Day website.

The One Health Day organizing team was very pleased to have received numerous outstanding entries for the three 2016 Student Event Competition awards. Competing groups had to meet a set of criteria and were required to submit a post-event summary. The International Evaluation Committee was impressed with the work of the One Health Day Student teams, and the decision process has hence been challenging. Based on an objective assessment by these internationally recognized One Health leaders, three teams will each be awarded a $5,000 prize. The winning 2016 One Health Day Student Event teams are: University of California at Davis, Washington University at St Louis, Missouri and George Washington University in Washington D.C. Two additional $500 One Health Day Planning Team Special Recognition Awards will go to the teams from Makerere University, Uganda, and the University of Pretoria, South Africa. Student Event awards in 2017 will go to the top event in each of four global regions so students are encouraged to begin planning.

Additional information is available online at www.onehealthday.org

####

About One Health Day

One Health Day answers the urgent need for a One Health trans-disciplinary approach towards solving today’s critical global health challenges. It is a timely initiative that gives scientists and advocates a powerful voice for moving beyond current provincial approaches to emerging zoonotic infectious diseases, antimicrobial resistance, climate change, environmental pollution, food safety, comparative/ translational medicine and many other problems, to a holistic default way of doing business.

About One Health

One Health is a movement to forge co-equal, all-inclusive collaborations, in both research and applied sciences, between human and animal health arenas, chemical, engineering and social scientists, dentists, nurses, agriculturalists and food producers, wildlife and environmental health specialists and many other related disciplines, assembled under the One Health umbrella. As early as 2010 the World Bank recognized and published documentary evidence supporting benefits of a One Health approach in disease prevention, public health and global security. Today, the One Health approach is being increasingly accepted by numerous major international organizations such as the World Medical Association (WMA), the World Veterinary Association (WVA), the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Many other supporting organizations can be found at http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php


An outstanding “One Health” leading Educational Institution of Higher Learning - Overview - Tuesday, January 24, 2017

An outstanding “One Health” leading Educational Institution of Higher Learning - Overview

Iowa State University – College of Veterinary Medicine

SEE: https://vetmed.iastate.edu/research-grad-studies/centers-institutes-and-initiatives/one-health

 One Health

The Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine has a long history of engagement in One Health. The veterinary profession and related health professions interact with both people and animals; therefore, providing a critical intersection of health and wellness information, especially in the areas of zoonotic and infectious diseases, and safe animal-sourced food products.

The College supports research related to animal and human health, especially in the areas of disease prevention, and maintenance of secure and safe animal food products.

One Health is reflected in our College Mission Statement: The Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine is dedicated to the enhancement of the health and well-being of animals and human beings through excellence in education, research, professional practice and committed service to the State of Iowa, the nation and the world. And supported by the Iowa State University Mission: Create, share and apply knowledge to make Iowa and the world a better place.

Also, our mission is aligned with the American Veterinary Medical College One Health Initiative: One Health is the integrative effort of multiple disciplines working locally, nationally, and globally to attain optimal health for people, animals, and the environment.

The Iowa State College of Veterinary Medicine supports One Health in all our university land-grant missions of education, research, professional practice, and outreach. Our curriculum is presented by knowledgeable instructors in comparative animal and human medicine, and many specialties.  These efforts are in collaboration with many university, college, and industry partners. We have long standing collaborations to improve animal and human health with the Iowa Regents Universities, especially the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and College of Public Health, and the USDA National Centers for Animal Health in Ames, IA.

One Health Related Programs

Additional Resources for One Health

Notable One Health leaders and Publications...

Dr. Lisa K. Nolan, Dr. Stephen G. Juelsgaard Dean of Veterinary Medicine https://vetmed.iastate.edu/users/lknolan

Dr. Claire Andreasen, One Health Director https://vetmed.iastate.edu/one-health-professor-and-director

Dr. James A. Roth, Director at the Iowa state University Center for Food Security and Public Health https://vetmed.iastate.edu/one-health-speaker/dr-james-roth and National Academy of Medicine member https://nam.edu/national-academy-of-medicine-elects-79-new-members/  

Dr. Glenda Dvorak, Assistant Director at the Iowa state University Center for Food Security and Public Health https://www.onehealthcommission.org/documents/filelibrary/leadership/Dvorak_Bio_Feb_2014_C30CA1F5D6EA5.pdf

Dr. Charles O. Thoen, Professor, Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine https://vetmed.iastate.edu/users/cthoen; author video and text entitled: "Tuberculosis in Animals and Humans: A One health Approach" in Education Portal of World Veterinary Association – 2016 http://wva.learning.education/searchOnlineTraining/#/training/162322.

ONE HEALTH TEXTBOOKS:

Zoonoses – Protecting People and Their Pets - 1st Edition (2013) http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/Products/zoonoses-protecting-people-and-their-pets.php?lang=en

Zoonotic Tuberculosis: Mycobacterium bovis and Other Pathogenic Mycobacteria - 3rd Edition (2014) http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118474295,subjectCd-LS50.html


A COGENT CASE FOR ‘ONE HEALTH’ IMPLEMENTATION...NOW January 2017! - Tuesday, January 10, 2017

 

cid:image001.jpg@01D25C25.21D22050                     

                      http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/

 

One Health is the collaborative efforts of multiple disciplines working locally, nationally, and globally to attain optimal health for people, animals, plants and our environment.

One Health implementation will help protect and/or save untold millions of lives in our generation and for those to come.

 

 Between animal and human medicine there are no dividing lines--nor should there be.”      Rudolf Virchow, MD (the father of cellular pathology)

 

January 2017 Editorial Commentary

One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono Team:

Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP ▪ Bruce Kaplan, DVM ▪ Thomas P. Monath, MD ▪ Lisa A. Conti, DVM, MPH

______________________________

 

In the prelude to World War II, Winston Churchill quoted Edwin James Milliken’s poem with the final line ‘Death is in charge of the clattering train!’, when he felt that the British parliament was not taking the prospect of a war against Adolph Hitler seriously enough.

 

“...Who is in charge of the clattering train?
The axles creak and the couplings strain,
and the pace is hot and the points are near,
and sleep hath deadened the driver's ear,
and the signals flash through the night in vain,
for death is in charge of the clattering train.”

 

A COGENT CASE FOR ‘ONE HEALTH’ IMPLEMENTATION...NOW January 2017!

 

The international community has begun to take the One Health approach seriously, especially during the early 21st century http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/01%20Kahn%20et%20al%20%205-19%208Mar07.pdf; http://www.izs.it/vet_italiana/2009/45_1/45_1.htm; http://www.izs.it/vet_italiana/2009/45_3/377.pdf.  This clattering train has been on and off the rails for many decades.  Failure to recognize, accept and fully implement this concept worldwide continues to deter human, animal, and environmental health life protecting and lifesaving advances yet to be applied and/or discovered!  One glaring example of critical need is that of the existential antimicrobial resistance threat discussed by the World Health Organization (WHO) http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs194/en/ and elaborated upon in a recently published book on the subject “One Health and the Politics of Antimicrobial Resistance https://jhupbooks.press.jhu.edu/content/one-health-and-politics-antimicrobial-resistance. 

 

Over the decades and indeed centuries, there have been and continues to be a vocal significant number of altruistic visionary research minded health scientists and officials within and among the public health, global health, clinical health, i.e. comparative medicine and planetary environmental health communities as well as some international governmental and political leaders that have seen the light...and essentially adopted the One Health approach, e.g. see http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php; 7 Prominent U.S. and international individual and organizational One Health Endorsements (multidisciplinary): Jan.- Dec. 2016 http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/news.php?query=7+Prominent+U.S.+and+international+individual+and+organizational+One+Health+Endorsements+%28multidisciplinary%29%3A+Jan.-+Dec.+2016+ and “34 Prominent U.S. and international individual and organizational One Health Endorsements (multidisciplinary) – June 2011 to December 2015” Endorsements (multidisciplinary) – June 2011 to December 2015”

 

http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/One%20Health%20Endorsements%20June%202011%20to%20December%202015.pdf

 

“One Health” is the pivotal point of how human health, animal health and the environment are inextricably linked.  Moreover, it is a key insight into and methodology for advancing the well-being of humans, animals and all global health more expeditiously and efficaciously http://www.springerpub.com/global-population-health-and-well-being-in-the-21st-century-toward-new-paradigms-policy-and-practice.html.   Having the One Health approach and principles implemented worldwide is truly equivalent to saying the sun rises in the east and sets in the west.  An effort has begun to help “prepare society to create the world we need through ‘One Health education” http://www.seejph.com/index.php/seejph/article/view/122 and http://onehealthkansas.k-state.edu/outreach/52/k-12-education-and-public-outreach-resources.   Aside from all the millions of words and esoterica published by scientific academicians and theoreticians worldwide during the past decade, there has emerged some irrefutable hardcore ‘real-world’ evidentiary proofs established for centuries and recently.

 

The documented tip of this One Health approach iceberg http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/ONE%20HEALTH%20a%20significant%20international%20public%20health%20comparative%20medicine%20OHI%20POSTING%20May%2013%202015.pdf:

 

“The One Health concept has been successfully applied to many clinical health and public health milieus during the 19th, 20th and early 21st centuries.  Some significant examples of clinical health advances through comparative medical/surgical endeavors occurred during the past centuries using the One Health approach, i.e. these include public health and comparative medicine issues such as Heart Disease, Cancer, Orthopedic Disease, Anesthesiology, Obesity, Parasitic Diseases, Tuberculosis, Global Infectious Disease, Influenza,  Human Hepatitis C virus, Tickborne Diseases, Food Safety, Hendra virus vaccine, Aspergillus felis, Immunizations (vaccinations), Lou Gehrig’s Disease,  Ebola, Antibiotic Use and Resistance, Staphylococcus resistant infections, Environmental health Policymaking, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever viruses, Renderpest, Emergency/Disaster preparedness and many others.”

 

Vaccines against diseases transmitted from animals to humans: A one health paradigm

“This review focuses on the immunization of animals as a means of preventing human diseases (zoonoses). …”In simple terms, the idea is to develop vaccines that protect domestic animals and wildlife thereby establishing effective barriers against human infections.  Developing animal vaccines are less expensive and are less strictly regulated than are those for humans.  Hopefully a common sense One Health approach can go forward.
http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/Thomas%20P.%20Monath,%20MD%20Sept%202013%20One%20Health%20Vaccine%20Article.pdf

 

Several available One Health textbooks in print http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/news.php?query=Four+Landmark+One+Health+Textbooks+of+the+early+21st+Century+ and http://www.springerpub.com/global-population-health-and-well-being-in-the-21st-century-toward-new-paradigms-policy-and-practice.html

 

Four current outstanding open-access One Health Journal options for publications http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/journals.php

 

MORE:

2nd Global Conference on One Health: the World Veterinary Association (WVA), World Medical Association (WMA), Japanese Medical Association (JMA) and Japanese Veterinary Medical Association (JVMA) – Posted One Health Initiative website NEWS Saturday, November 12, 2016

2nd Global Conference on One Health: the World Veterinary Association (WVA), World Medical Association (WMA), Japanese Medical Association (JMA) and Japanese Veterinary Medical Association (JVMA)

Held in Japan – November 10-11, 2016

“During the Closing Ceremony of the 2nd Global Conference on One Health, the World Veterinary Association (WVA), World Medical Association (WMA), Japanese Medical Association (JMA) and Japanese Veterinary Medical Association (JVMA) signed on the Memorandum of Fukuoka. The 4 associations agreed to move from the validation and recognition stage of the “One Health Concept”, to the practical implementation stage:

1. Physicians and veterinarians shall promote the exchange of information aimed at preventing zoonotic diseases and strengthening cooperative relationships, as well as to undertake further collaboration and cooperation aimed at creating a system for zoonosis research.
2. Physicians and veterinarians shall strengthen their cooperative relationships to ensure the responsible use of important antimicrobials in human and animal healthcare.
3. Physicians and veterinarians shall support activities for developing and improving human and veterinary medical education, including understanding the One Health concept and approach to One Health challenges.
4. Physicians and veterinarians shall promote mutual exchange and strengthen their cooperative relationships in order to resolve all issues related to the creation of a healthy and safe society
.

World Medical Journal – UN 2030 Sustainable Development Goals and One Health

 http://lab.arstubiedriba.lv/WMJ/vol62/december-2016/#page=44

 

SEE “One Health Umbrella” graphic http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/OneHealth2


2nd World Veterinary Association/World Medical Association GLOBAL CONFERENCE ON ONE HEALTH – November 10 -11, 2016 - Friday, December 30, 2016

Posted One Health Initiative website Wednesday, December 21, 2016 http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications.php?query=2nd+World+Veterinary+Association%2FWorld+Medical+Association+GLOBAL+CONFERENCE+ON+ONE+HEALTH+%96+November+10+-11%2C+2016+

 

2nd World Veterinary Association/World Medical Association GLOBAL CONFERENCE ON ONE HEALTH – November 10 -11, 2016

 

Moving forward from One Health Concept to One Health Approach 10 -11th November 2016, Kitakyushu City, Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan

 

SEE complete Summary http://www.worldvet.org/uploads/docs/2gcoh_japan_summary_2016.pdf

 

The 2GCOH resulted in the historic signature on the Memorandum of Fukuoka by WVA, WMA, JMA and JMVA. The 4 associations agreed to move from the validation and recognition stage of the “One Health Concept”, to the practical implementation stage:

 

i. Physicians and veterinarians shall promote the exchange of information aimed at preventing zoonotic diseases and strengthening cooperative relationships, as well as to undertake further collaboration and cooperation aimed at creating a system for zoonosis research.

ii. Physicians and veterinarians shall strengthen their cooperative relationships to ensure the responsible use of important antimicrobials in human and animal healthcare.

iii. Physicians and veterinarians shall support activities for developing and improving human and veterinary medical education, including understanding the One Health concept and approach to One Health challenges.

iv. Physicians and veterinarians shall promote mutual exchange and strengthen their cooperative relationships in order to resolve all issues related to the creation of a healthy and safe society.

 

Following the successful 2GCOH, the WVA and WMA received a number of proposals from Veterinary and Medical Associations to hold the 3rd Global Conference on One Health in their countries showing their great interest to enhance the collaborations between the veterinarians and physicians to work together on One Health issues.”


2nd Global Conference on One Health: the World Veterinary Association (WVA), World Medical Association (WMA), Japanese Medical Association (JMA) and Japanese Veterinary Medical Association (JVMA) - Saturday, November 12, 2016

2nd Global Conference on One Health: the World Veterinary Association (WVA), World Medical Association (WMA), Japanese Medical Association (JMA) and Japanese Veterinary Medical Association (JVMA)

Held in Japan – November 10-11, 2016

“During the Closing Ceremony of the 2nd Global Conference on One Health, the World Veterinary Association (WVA), World Medical Association (WMA), Japanese Medical Association (JMA) and Japanese Veterinary Medical Association (JVMA) signed on the Memorandum of Fukuoka. The 4 associations agreed to move from the validation and recognition stage of the “One Health Concept”, to the practical implementation stage:

1. Physicians and veterinarians shall promote the exchange of information aimed at preventing zoonotic diseases and strengthening cooperative relationships, as well as to undertake further collaboration and cooperation aimed at creating a system for zoonosis research.
2. Physicians and veterinarians shall strengthen their cooperative relationships to ensure the responsible use of important antimicrobials in human and animal healthcare.
3. Physicians and veterinarians shall support activities for developing and improving human and veterinary medical education, including understanding the One Health concept and approach to One Health challenges.
4. Physicians and veterinarians shall promote mutual exchange and strengthen their cooperative relationships in order to resolve all issues related to the creation of a healthy and safe society
.


One Health Day 2016 World Veterinary Association and World Medical Association - A GLOBAL EXAMPLE FOR ONE HEALTH APPROACH - Thursday, November 03, 2016

One Health Day 2016 World Veterinary Association and World Medical Association - A GLOBAL EXAMPLE FOR ONE HEALTH APPROACH

 SEE: http://www.worldvet.org/news.php?item=301 and http://www.worldvet.org/uploads/news/docs/wva_wma_ohday_2016.pdf

The WVA and WMA are celebrating today the One Health Day to highlight the importance of the One Health Concept as the integrative effort of multiple disciplines working together to attain optimal health for people, animals, and the environment.

One Health Day 2016 WVA and WMA - A GLOBAL EXAMPLE FOR ONE HEALTH APPROACHdownload doc

In October 2012, the WVA representing the global veterinary profession and the WMA representing the global medical profession signed on a Memorandum of Understanding to collaborate in a unified approach to tackle common health issues to improve Global Health.

The WVA-WMA collaboration plan focuses on zoonotic diseases, responsible use of antimicrobials and enhancing collaboration on education, clinical care and public health. WVA and WMA are holding periodical meetings to discuss issues of common interest and participating in the each other's events to highlight the work and progress of their profession addressing health concerns on a global level.

In the last years, the two organizations prepared and published joint statements and supported each-other on various health issues such as rabies control, antibiotic resistance and the regular availability of Ketamine (non-scheduling) and on the One Health concept.

In May 2015, for the first time in history, the two world associations organized a Global Conference on One Health with the theme: Drivers towards One Health- “Strengthening collaboration between Physicians and Veterinarians”. The event signified the acknowledgement by both disciplines, at the highest level, of the importance of cooperation between the veterinary and medical professions. The conference concluded that in order to make a difference, the health professions need to work on Leadership, Networking, Cooperation, Communication, Facilitation, and Building trust at all levels starting from veterinary and medical schools.

Following this successful conference, the WVA and WMA in close collaboration with the Japanese Medical and Veterinary Associations, are preparing a second conference with the theme: Moving forward from One Health Concept to One Health Approach to take place in Japan later on this month.

The WVA/WMA initiative encouraged a number WVA and WMA members to adopt this model of collaboration and to sign similar agreements between Veterinary and Medical associations at national level to use the One Health Approach in their countries.

Join the WVA and WMA in celebrating the One Health Day 2016, raising the importance of inter-sectorial collaboration to improve the health of people, animals and the environment.


ONE HEALTH DAY CALLS FOR TRANS-DISCIPLINARY COLLABORATIONS TO IMPROVE GLOBAL HEALTH - Tuesday, November 01, 2016

1 NOVEMBER 2016   For Immediate Release

please See: http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/1%20NOVEMBER%202016%20%20%20For%20Immediate%20Release.pdf

 

Contact(s):  Peter Costa, +1 984 500 8593 (USA), pcosta@onehealthcommission.org

                      Chris Vanlangendonck, +32 475 81 38 59 (Belgium), c.vanlangendonck@onehealthplatform.com

 

ONE HEALTH DAY CALLS FOR TRANS-DISCIPLINARY COLLABORATIONS TO IMPROVE GLOBAL HEALTH

                   Over 110 events being celebrated around the world 

 

An evening of academic talks and public discussion in Finland, a One Health poster competition in the US, a One Health University Students Club meeting in Rwanda, an international symposium on food safety in Chile, and a One Health Awareness Week in Afghanistan... these are but five examples from over 100 global events in 35 countries across six continents being organized at the occasion of the first annual One Health Day on 3 November 2016.

One Health Day answers the urgent need for a One Health trans-disciplinary approach towards solving today’s critical global health challenges. It is a timely initiative that gives scientists and advocates a powerful voice for moving beyond current provincial approaches to emerging infectious diseases, antimicrobial resistance, climate change, environmental pollution, and many other problems, to a holistic default way of doing business.

One Health Day was officially launched on 31 March 2016 by three leading international One Health groups, the One Health Commission, the One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono Team, and the One Health Platform Foundation. They called upon individuals and groups from around the world to implement One Health educational projects and awareness events under the auspices of One Health Day. Today, their joint call has generated an inspiring array of projects worldwide.

But equally important: this global partnership is growing into a sustainable platform for One Health supporters around the world. Regional One Health Day Spokespersons in Africa, Asia, Oceania, the Middle East, Europe and the Americas liaised with project teams in their respective regions, while a network of One Health Day Country Ambassadors worked within their countries to encourage creation of inspiring events. Student groups from all disciplines were given the option to compete for cash prizes and global recognition. And many participating teams have requested a translated version of the One Health Day logo, into French, Indonesian, Vietnamese, Turkish, Greek and more. All promotional materials are freely downloadable from the One Health Day website.

“The amazing number of global events planned by scientists, health practitioners and students has really exceeded our expectations and demonstrates the great interest and need for health professions to work together. We are delighted to continue this initiative in the future”, said Dr. Cheryl Stroud, Executive Director of the One Health Commission.

One Health Day 2016 is warmly dedicated to the memory of Jack Woodall, PhD, One Health Day Planning Team Leader, Co-Founder and Associate Editor of ProMED-mail and a member of the One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono team.  Dr. Woodall died 24 October 2016 of pancreatic cancer. His vision, energy and leadership will be sorely missed.

Additional information and an entire list of participating events is available online at www.onehealthday.org

 

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 About One Health

One Health is a movement to forge co-equal, all-inclusive collaborations, in both research and applied sciences, between human and animal health arenas, chemical, engineering and social scientists, dentists, nurses, agriculturalists and food producers, wildlife and environmental health specialists and many other related disciplines, assembled under the One Health umbrella. As early as 2010 the World Bank recognized and published documentary evidence supporting benefits of a One Health approach in disease prevention, public health and global security. Today, the One Health approach is being increasingly accepted by numerous major international organizations such as the World Medical Association (WMA), the World Veterinary Association (WVA), the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Other supporting organizations can be found at http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php


World Veterinary Association (WVA) and World Medical Association (WMA) Joint Press release: Eradicating rabies is a public health necessity - Tuesday, September 27, 2016

World Veterinary Association (WVA) and World Medical Association (WMA) Joint Press release: Eradicating rabies is a public health necessity

Please see: http://www.worldvet.org/uploads/news/docs/wva_wma_pr_for_wrd_2016.pdf

The WVA and the WMA have joined forces to mark World Rabies Day by calling for human rabies transmitted from unvaccinated dogs infected with rabies to be totally eradicated by 2030

The World Veterinary Association (WVA) and the World Medical Association (WMA) have joined forces to mark World Rabies Day (September 28) by calling for human rabies transmitted from unvaccinated dogs infected with rabies to be totally eradicated by 2030  in collaboration with the “End Rabies Now” campaign initiated by the Global Alliance for Rabies Control. It has been estimated that rabies kills more than 60,000 people every year, about 40 per cent of whom are children less than 15 years old. It is a disease more prevalent in poor communities.

Dr. René Carlson, President of the World Veterinary Association, states: ‘Rabies is one of the deadliest diseases we know. Yet rabies is preventable if several measures are followed. Some of these measures include mass vaccination programs of dogs, humane population control of dogs through spay and neuter programs, community education about rabies and dog bite prevention, the importance of dog bite medical treatment, and availability of rabies vaccine therapy after exposure. We currently have the tools to prevent this devastating disease and eliminate the suffering of both dogs and people who contract this essentially fatal disease. Eradicating rabies is not an option. It is a public health necessity.’

She points out that when a person is bitten by a suspect rabid animal, that person must seek immediate medical care and be evaluated for rabies vaccine therapy. If possible the animal that bit the person should be examined, quarantined at an appropriate location, or euthanized for rabies virus infection verification by a qualified laboratory. Once symptoms of rabies appear, the disease is nearly always fatal. Canine vaccination and responsible pet ownership are essential measures to avoid this fate.

 Sir Michael Marmot, President of the World Medical Association, states: ‘Many countries and communities have taken the right measures to prevent or eradicate rabies. But unfortunately the disease still kills many children in poor rural communities. Rabies is a disease that is very much dependent on living conditions. So improving living conditions and fostering public health services will save many lives.’

Join the WVA and WMA in celebrating the World Rabies Day 2016, raising awareness about Rabies worldwide and to collaborate with the “End Rabies Now” campaign to eradicate Rabies by 2030.


 
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