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REMINDER POSTING: "Vaccines against diseases transmitted from animals to humans: A one health paradigm" - Monday, October 17, 2016

In light of the previous October 12, 2016 One Health Initiative NEWS item regarding an Important One Health Publication…International Journal of Vaccines and Vaccination “Reservoir-Targeted Vaccines as a One Health Path to Prevent Zoonotic Disease”, the One Health Initiative team is reposting a pertinent “One Health” NEWS item from 2013: see below and links

http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/news.php?query=Important+Reminder%3A+Posted+Wednesday%2C+October+09%2C+2013+on+One+Health+Initiative+website%3A+A+potential+large+scale+%93One+Health+in+Action%94+...+another+dynamic+case+for+implementing+One+Health%21 or https://goo.gl/vH9LWl

 

Important Reminder: Posted Wednesday, October 09, 2013 on One Health Initiative website: A potential large scale “One Health in Action” ... another dynamic case for implementing One Health! - Saturday, October 19, 2013

Important Reminder: Posted Wednesday, October 09, 2013 on One Health Initiative website:

A potential large scale “One Health in Action” ... another dynamic case for implementing One Health!

 

Vaccines against diseases transmitted from animals to humans: A one health paradigm

“This review focuses on the immunization of animals as a means of preventing human diseases (zoonoses). …”

In simple terms, the idea is to develop vaccines that protect domestic animals and wildlife thereby establishing effective barriers against human infections.  Developing animal vaccines are less expensive and are less strictly regulated than are those for humans.  Hopefully a common sense One Health approach can go forward.

http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/Thomas%20P.%20Monath,%20MD%20Sept%202013%20One%20Health%20Vaccine%20Article.pdf 


International Journal of Vaccines and Vaccination - “Reservoir-Targeted Vaccines as a One Health Path to Prevent Zoonotic Disease” - Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Important One Health Publication…

International Journal of Vaccines and Vaccination

“Reservoir-Targeted Vaccines as a One Health Path to Prevent Zoonotic Disease”

Permission to post on One Health Initiative website October 12, 2016 granted by:

  Steve Zatechka, PhD, MBA, Chief Operating Officer, US Biologic, Inc, 20 Dudley, Suite 900, Memphis, TN 38103, USA, Tel: 901-755-6868 E-mail steve.zatechka@usbiologic.com 

 Abstract

“Reservoir-targeted vaccines (RTVs) are emerging as an effective means by which to control the spread of zoonotic and vector-borne diseases. Delivered as an orally-administered antigen, the biologistics involved in the distribution of RTVs are administered as part of a platform solution to address the growing risk from zoonotic and vector-borne diseases. Specific performance measures must therefore be considered in the stable presentation of antigen of a potency to elicit mucosal immunity and control disease transmission. Concomitantly, several criteria are also required in order to administer a commercially feasible and scalable safe and efficacious vaccine into field conditions, for oral consumption. Such a solution further aligns with the One Health Initiative. As an exemplary case study, an RTV addressing the epidemic of Lyme disease is presented.”

SEE Complete article at: http://medcraveonline.com/IJVV/IJVV-02-00049.pdf

Note: Dr. Zatechka is a longstanding supporter/advocate of the One Health concept http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php.


IMPORTANT ONE HEALTH MEETING REMINDERS... - Thursday, September 22, 2016

Reminder: Animal Biotech Summit - September 21-23, 2016 in Bethesda, Maryland

http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/Animal%20Biotech%20Summit%202016.pdf

SEE: http://www.biotech-now.org/food-and-agriculture/2016/08/what-is-the-one-health-paradigm-all-about-in-a-nutshell-and-more

 

Reminder: One Health Inter-Regional European Conference

Date:  22nd – 23rd – 24th of September, 2016

Location Palace of the Parliament, Bucharest, Romania

For complete information see: http://www.onehealth.ro/en/


2016 National Institute for Animal Agriculture (NIAA) Antibiotics Symposium Emphasis on Working Together Across Animal and Human Health - Thursday, August 18, 2016

Important One Health issue...

For Immediate Release                                                  Contact: Katie Ambrose
Date: August 17, 2016
                                katie.ambrose@animalagriculture.org
                                                                                 719-538-8843, Ext 14

2016 National Institute for Animal Agriculture (NIAA) Antibiotics Symposium Emphasis on Working Together Across Animal and Human Health

Colorado Springs, Colo.The National Institute for Animal Agriculture (NIAA) will once again host a unique gathering focused on a collaborative and continued dialogue about antibiotic use and antimicrobial resistance. Not about one point of view, the 2016 NIAA hosted Antibiotics Symposium provides a setting for a thoughtful exchange of ideas for the betterment of animal and human health.

The Symposium entitled, Antibiotic Use – Working Together for Better Solutions, takes place November 1-3, 2016 at the Hyatt Regency Dulles, Herndon, Va.

All sectors of the animal food production and human/public health industries will come together around this, one of the most important topics in animal and human health today. The sixth Symposium hosted by NIAA and its partners, NIAA continues to develop the dialog on antimicrobial resistance through collaboration and cross-industry discussion.

Presenters will be from organizations such as the CDC, FDA, and USDA, along with industry leaders, retailers, processors, producers, and representatives from both human and public health. To move forward, animal agriculture must outline what appropriate use of antibiotics really means, and identify the core elements of stewardship. 

Building trust, developing tools and deploying strategies will take all of us Working Together.

For more information or to register online go animalagriculture.org/2016-Antibiotics-Symposium or contact the NIAA by calling 719-538-8843 or email niaa@animalagriculture.org.

The National Institute for Animal Agriculture provides a forum for building consensus and advancing proactive solutions for animal agriculture—the aquaculture, beef, dairy, equine, goats, poultry, sheep and swine industries—and provides continuing education and communication linkages for animal agriculture professionals. NIAA is dedicated to programs which work towards the eradication of disease which pose risk to the health of animals, wildlife and humans; which promote a safe and wholesome food supply for our nation and abroad; and which promote best practices in environmental stewardship, animal health and well-being. NIAA members represent all facets of animal agriculture.

###


Important One Health Webinar –July 13, 2016 at 11am EDT with Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP Presenting - Tuesday, July 12, 2016

U.S. One Health Commission (OHC) Sponsors Important One Health Webinar –July 13, 2016 at 11am EDT with Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP Presenting

 

"One Health can provide a safe, 'no judgment zone' for many needed conversations surrounding our most difficult global and environmental health challenges. On July 6, 2016 the One Health Commission was pleased to present Dr. Kahn's data driven research in her webinar, 'One Health and the Politics of Antibiotic Resistance'. The first of a two-part series, that webinar saw over 200 online attendees from over 30 countries. Now that the word is out, tomorrow's July 13th webinar on 'Antimicrobial Resistance and the Environment' will likely draw even more participants."

 

 Cheryl Stroud, DVM, PhD, Executive Director, One Health Commission  

 

https://www.onehealthcommission.org/index.cfm/37526/78598/antimicrobial_resistance_in_the_environment_part_2_of_2

Antimicrobial Resistance in the Environment (Part 2 of 2)

07/13/2016 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM  EDT

Title: Antimicrobial Resistance in the Environment (Part 2 of 2)

Overview: 
This presentation will discuss findings of widespread antibiotic resistance in the environment. Massive amounts of human and animal waste applied to agricultural fields alter the global “resistome.” Wildlife never exposed to antibiotics harbor antibiotic resistant bacteria in their feces. The Human Microbiome project has found that microbial cells outnumber human cells by an estimated 10-fold, fundamentally changing our perceptions about health and disease. Taken together, the findings of antibiotic resistance in external and internal environments suggest that human antibiotic use has altered global microbial populations in ways that we do not fully understand. We are fast approaching a post antibiotic era. This presents challenges and opportunities and will require a One Health approach to succeed. 

Learning Objectives: 
1. Understand the 21st century challenges posed by the growing human population and its increasing demands for terrestrial and aquatic animal proteins. 
2. Develop familiarity with metagenomics and “The Global Resistome.” 
3. Understand how open defecation jeopardizes human, animal, and environmental health. 
4. Understand how application of manure to agricultural fields alters the global “resistome” and harms global health. 

Speaker: 
Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP 
Research Scholar 
Program on Science and Global Security 
Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs 
Princeton University
 

Dr. Kahn is a Co-Founder, One Health Initiative, http://www.onehealthinitiative.com
and Columnist, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, http://www.thebulletin.org  

 For more information, please click here.


Webinar: One Health and the Politics of Antibiotic Resistance (Part 1 of 2) - Friday, June 17, 2016

U.S. One Health Commission Sponsors Important One Health Webinar – Wednesdays, July 6, 2016 and July 13, 2016 at 11am EDT

Webinar: One Health and the Politics of Antibiotic Resistance (Part 1 of 2)

https://www.onehealthcommission.org/index.cfm/37526/78597/webinar_one_health_and_the_politics_of_antibiotic_resistance_part_1_of_2

07/06/2016 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

EDT

 

Title

One Health and the Politics of Antibiotic Resistance (Part 1 of 2)

Overview: 
The rise of antibiotic resistant bacteria has created a crisis in medicine and veterinary medicine. The use of antibiotics as growth promoting agents in livestock has been a highly political issue. Europe approved avoparcin, a growth-promoting antibiotic, in the 1970’s. Its widespread use led to the rise of vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE). In contrast, the US has requested that its livestock producers voluntarily stop using antibiotic growth promoting agents. Using a One Health approach by integrating the perspectives of medicine/public health and veterinary medicine/agriculture, this presentation briefly compares and contrasts the EU versus the US experience regarding antibiotic use, antibiotic resistance, and livestock production. 

Learning Objectives: 
1. Understand the history behind low dose antibiotic use in agriculture. 
2. Understand how the rise of vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) drove public policy in
Europe
3. Understand the different policy approaches in Europe and the U.S. regarding avoparcin, a growth-promoting antibiotic used extensively in pork production, and how they impacted VRE epidemiology. 
4. Understand how genomics can play a crucial role in antimicrobial resistance surveillance. 

Speaker: 
Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP 
Research Scholar 
Program on Science and Global Security 
Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs 
Princeton University 

Co-Founder, One Health Initiative, 
http://www.onehealthinitiative.com
 

Columnist, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists,
http://www.thebulletin.org
 

 Part 2 of this webinar series, "Antimicrobial Resistance in the Environment", will be held on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 at 11am EDT. Click here for more information and to register. 

 Webinar: One Health and the Politics of Antibiotic Resistance (Part 1 of 2) Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP https://goo.gl/ak4f6T


REMINDER: important One Health issues involved...International Society for Infectious Diseases/ProMED Symposium on Emerging Infectious Diseases at 2015 American Society of Microbiology’s Conference of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC)/ Interna - Saturday, September 12, 2015

REMINDER: important One Health issues involved...

International Society for Infectious Diseases/ProMED Symposium on Emerging Infectious Diseases at 2015 American Society of Microbiology’s Conference of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC)/ International Congress of Chemotherapy and Infection (ICC) – September 17, 2015

Please consider joining ISID, ProMED and ASM in a new one-day collaborative symposium, Emerging Infectious Diseases in the Time of Ebola, at ICAAC/ICC on Thursday, September 17, 2015.

With the goal of providing a critical update on emerging infectious diseases in a global context, an international panel of infectious disease experts will discuss updates on advances in understanding and investigating emerging diseases and evolving methods for predicting, detecting and managing outbreaks. Sessions will fully embody the "One Health" model of emerging diseases, recognizing the commonality of human, animal and environmental health.

The symposium is designed to create a lively atmosphere for discussion and exchange of knowledge. It is suited for researchers, clinicians, veterinary health specialists, microbiologists, virologists, public health officials and policy makers at all levels interested in emerging pathogens and outbreak control.

Partial list of session titles:

  • Challenges and Trends in Emerging Infectious Diseases: A Global Perspective
  • Drivers of Disease Emergence
  • Preventing Emerging Pandemic Threats
  • Innovations in Emerging Disease Detection
  • Challenges and Controversies from the 2014- 2015 Ebola Outbreak and What We Can Learn

Website link: http://www.icaac.org/index.php/2015-01-26-21-25-33/scientific-sessions/icaac-isid-joint-symposium

Provided August 20, 2015 by:

Britta Lassmann, MD

ISID Program Director


Repeat: Important One Health approach for human protection via animal vaccinations/immunizations… - Monday, March 16, 2015

Repeat: Important One Health approach for human protection via animal vaccinations/immunizations…

Originally Posted One Health Initiative NEWS page October 9, 2013 - http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/news.php?query=+A+potential+large+scale+%93One+Health+in+Action%94+...+another+dynamic+case+for+implementing+One+Health%21+  

*Vaccines against diseases transmitted from animals to humans: A one health paradigm

“This review focuses on the immunization of animals as a means of preventing human diseases (zoonoses). …”

In simple terms, the idea is to develop vaccines that protect domestic animals and wildlife thereby establishing effective barriers against human infections.  Developing animal vaccines are less expensive and are less strictly regulated than are those for humans.  Hopefully a common sense One Health approach can go forward.

http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/Thomas%20P.%20Monath,%20MD%20Sept%202013%20One%20Health%20Vaccine%20Article.pdf

 

Subsequent supportive publication December 31, 2014:

Plant-based solutions for veterinary immunotherapeutics and prophylactics: Veterinary Research 2014, 45:117  doi:10.1186/s13567-014-0117-4 http://www.veterinaryresearch.org/content/45/1/117

 

http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications.php?query=Important+One+Health+approach+for+human+protection+via+expanded+animal+vaccination+Plant-based+solutions+for+veterinary+immunotherapeutics+and+prophylactics%2Fimmunization  

 “…So, it is viewed as inevitable by the One Health Initiative that humans need to reduce the use of antibiotics and turn to alternative, improved means to control disease: vaccination and prophylactics. …”

Abstract

An alarming increase in emergence of antibiotic resistance among pathogens worldwide has become a serious threat to our ability to treat infectious diseases according to the World Health Organization. Extensive use of antibiotics by livestock producers promotes the spread of new resistant strains, some of zoonotic concern, which increases food-borne illness in humans and causes significant economic burden on healthcare systems. Furthermore, consumer preferences for meat/poultry/fish produced without the use of antibiotics shape today’s market demand. *So, it is viewed as inevitable by the One Health Initiative that humans need to reduce the use of antibiotics and turn to alternative, improved means to control disease: vaccination and prophylactics. Besides the intense research focused on novel therapeutic molecules, both these strategies rely heavily on the availability of cost-effective, efficient and scalable production platforms which will allow large-volume manufacturing for vaccines, antibodies and other biopharmaceuticals. Within this context, plant-based platforms for production of recombinant therapeutic proteins offer significant advantages over conventional expression systems, including lack of animal pathogens, low production costs, fast turnaround and response times and rapid, nearly-unlimited scalability. Also, because dried leaves and seeds can be stored at room temperature for lengthy periods without loss of recombinant proteins, plant expression systems have the potential to offer lucrative benefits from the development of edible vaccines and prophylactics, as these would not require cold storage and transportation, and could be administered in mass volumes with minimal processing. Several biotechnology companies currently have developed and adopted plant-based platforms for commercial production of recombinant protein therapeutics. In this manuscript, we outline the challenges in the process of livestock immunization as well as the current plant biotechnology developments aimed to address these challenges. 


Important One Health REPEAT reminders…why “One Health” approach is essential for the 21st century! - Friday, October 10, 2014

Important One Health REPEAT reminders…why “One Health” approach is essential for the 21st century!

 

Posted Wednesday, October 09, 2013 on One Health Initiative website NEWS page:

A potential large scale “One Health in Action” ... another dynamic case for implementing One Health!

 

Vaccines against diseases transmitted from animals to humans: A one health paradigm

“This review focuses on the immunization of animals as a means of preventing human diseases (zoonoses). …”

In simple terms, the idea is to develop vaccines that protect domestic animals and wildlife thereby establishing effective barriers against human infections.  Developing animal vaccines are less expensive and are less strictly regulated than are those for humans.  Hopefully a common sense One Health approach can go forward.

http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/Thomas%20P.%20Monath,%20MD%20Sept%202013%20One%20Health%20Vaccine%20Article.pdf 

 

 


 

One Health approach acknowledged worldwide—Examples (USA, Europe, Asia, Australia, India): - Posted One Health Initiative website NEWS page Sunday, August 17, 2014

One Health approach acknowledged worldwide—Examples (USA, Europe, Asia, Australia, India):

 SEE http://goo.gl/UURd4N; http://goo.gl/9jIyGT; http://goo.gl/aYKoeR; http://goo.gl/Mu3NUa; http://goo.gl/OGWuFp; http://goo.gl/35wbdB  


Important One Health oriented interview with an Outstanding University of Pennsylvania Dean… - Sunday, May 18, 2014

Important One Health oriented interview with an Outstanding University of Pennsylvania Dean…

Q&A with Joan Hendricks, VMD, PhD [USA]

Dr. Hendricks http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g293/p20944, a veterinarian, is a prominent longstanding One Health supporter/advocate/leader http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php.

By Heather A. Davis – May 8, 2014

 

Penn Current, Office of University of Pennsylvania
Office of
University Communications, 200 Sansom Place East,
3600 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6106 (USA)

“According to Joan Hendricks, dean of Penn’s School of Veterinary Medicine, people go into veterinary medicine because of a couple reasons. They love animals, probably first and foremost. They also have a fascination with science and desire to understand how things work—whether it’s canine vision, equine orthopedics, or cell and molecular biology.

These medical professionals, Hendricks says, have the potential to change the world—perhaps because veterinarians are trained to innately understand how animal and human health is linked together, as well as to the world around them.

“Veterinarians do so much more than take care of your cat—not that we don’t love the cat and are very proud of the cat, the dog, the horse,” Hendricks explains. “Our training and what we want to do is to make the world better for all living things. It folds in everything—biomedical science to make health better not just for people but for animals, as well. We may be studying cancer in a cat or how to get rid of digestive problems in a cow. But we’re also doing it in a way that we know will benefit people, and we may be doing it with MDs or other expert colleagues.” …”

“…You talk a lot about the One Health concept. What is that, exactly?
A: The school has always had a sense that our job was to advance knowledge to benefit domestic animals and people together. For a long time, we thought of it as treating diseases, so we talked about one medicine, many species. The One Health concept is a little bit more wholistic and progressive, and says that the health of people and animals are interdependent, and interdependent with the wild environment, as well. Veterinary medicine is the only multispecies medical specialty. All veterinarians have a particular connection with the medical school. … It’s a grounding for everything from doing a good job taking care of the animals to also being able to identify ways that they will be healthier, so it’s genetics, nutrition, or the way they’re taking care of training and how the people connect to them, as well. And if you’re talking about animals that serve people by doing some kind of work like the working dogs, or producing food and fiber, you want the animals really healthy because that’s the best outcome for everybody. A component of One Health is linked to food production. It’s a natural thing for a veterinarian to be linked to animal source food because you want the animals healthy. There’s a mission for veterinarians that is in our oath that we serve human society and animals. … It’s really about resolving, making sure that both sides of the equation do well and solving the problems that come about when the interests are in conflict. Connecting to animals is better for people than not. …”

Please read complete article interview at http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/current/2014-05-08/interviews/qa-joan-hendricks


 
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