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"One Health collaboration" Essential - Evidence documented for Comparative Medicine & Global Public Health - Tuesday, September 12, 2017

"One Health collaboration" Essential - Evidence documented for Comparative Medicine & Global Public Health

 

“One Health collaboration” 2017 American Veterinary Medical Association convention promotional comments https://goo.gl/5SBEo1 (one minute 41 seconds)…

 

Then see Heart Disease proof/positive endorsement https://goo.gl/hL5oZC plus many more (tip of the iceberg) https://goo.gl/rDYVNn

Including: Heart Disease, Cancer, Orthopedic Disease, Anesthesiology, Obesity, Parasitic Diseases, Tuberculosis, Global Infectious Disease, Influenza, Human Hepatitis C virus, Tickborne Diseases, Food Safety, Hendra virus vaccine, Aspergillus felis, Immunizations (vaccinations), Lou Gehrig’s Disease, Ebola, Antibiotic Use and Resistance, Staphylococcus resistant infections, Environmental health Policymaking, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever viruses, Renderpest, Emergency/Disaster preparedness and others.


One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono Team Member (veterinarian co-founder) awarded 2017 American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Meritorious Service Award - Thursday, August 31, 2017

One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono Team Member (veterinarian co-founder) awarded 2017 American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Meritorious Service Award

 

Dr. Bruce Kaplan received the 2017 AVMA Meritorious Service Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Veterinary Profession – July 22, 2017 in Indianapolis, Indiana (USA) (https://goo.gl/mfkBRj; biography https://goo.gl/zbVw2t).  JAVMA News, September 15, 2017 issue https://www.avma.org/News/JAVMANews/Pages/170915d.aspx.

Please view and listen to awardee’s brief audio-video message (1 minute 41 seconds) promoting One Health to AVMA convention audience, practicing veterinarians and all health scientist professionals in the U.S. and worldwide: https://www.dropbox.com/s/cye61r1yvowv72k/Award%20Kaplan.mov?dl=0


World experts in One Health contribute to new Checklist for One Health Epidemiological Reporting of Evidence (COHERE) - Wednesday, August 09, 2017

World experts in One Health contribute to new Checklist for One Health Epidemiological Reporting of Evidence (COHERE)

 

Submitted to the One Health Initiative website August 2, 2017 by:

 Meghan Frost Davis

*Meghan F. Davis, DVM, MPH, PhD                                       

https://www.jhsph.edu/faculty/directory/profile/3059/meghan-frost-davis 
Assistant Professor
Department of Environmental Health and Engineering
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (USA)
mdavis65@jhu.edu

 

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/5c9OaQopE_A/hqdefault.jpg?sqp=-oaymwEXCNACELwBSFryq4qpAwkIARUAAIhCGAE=&rs=AOn4CLC6IOwYCzA3lfGQBIYYTdd847fWjQ

**Peter M. Rabinowitz, MD, MPH

http://deohs.washington.edu/faculty/rabinowitz_peter

Associate Professor

Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences

Department of Global Health, Department of Family Medicine

Division of Allergy and Infectious Disease (adjunct)

University of Washington School of Public Health, School of Medicine

Director, Center for One Health Research (USA)

Peterr7@uw.edu

 

A world-renowned group of ten experts http://deohs.washington.edu/cohr/cohere-expert-review-group contributed to the design of the newly-reported Checklist for One Health Epidemiological Reporting of Evidence (COHERE), recently published by the journal One Health http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352771417300022.  This tool consists of a set of 19 standards for components that should be included in the conduct and reporting of One Health studies that use observational or interventional epidemiological designs.  It also aims to promote the concept that One Health studies should integrate data from humans, animals, and their environment.  Therefore, experts were included to represent aspects of all three of these domains.

“The expert participants' perspectives enriched the tool by the very nature of addressing their experiences across disciplines,” noted Dr. Lisa A. Conti https://goo.gl/MLVRk1, a veterinarian member of the One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono team www.onehealthinitiative.com, the 2017 recipient of the prestigious American Veterinary Epidemiology Society’s (AVES) KF Meyer/James H. Steele Gold Headed Cane Award https://goo.gl/3yaCpK, and internationally recognized One Health leader, who was a co-author on the manuscript.   Dr. Conti added, “...their thoughtful consideration of a unified approach was critical to refining the tool.”  Inclusion of many experts in the process was essential to make the tool flexible to researchers who represent a wide variety of professions and disciplines.

The authors of the manuscript and the expert review group agreed that COHERE should be a living document—one that could be amended to respond to the inclusion of new disciplines, technologies, and ideas. They encourage editors, reviewers, authors, and readers of the One Health literature to contact the COHERE team with suggestions.

 

*Dr. Davis, a veterinarian, is listed on the One Health Initiative website’s Supporters page http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php.

**Dr. Rabinowitz, is a longstanding physician member of the One Health Initiative team’s Advisory Board http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/advBoard.php.


Gold Headed Cane Awarded to One Health Initiative Team Member – Dr. Lisa A. Conti - Monday, July 31, 2017

Dr. Craig N. Carter, left presenting American Veterinary Epidemiology Society (AVES) Gold Headed Cane to Dr. Lisa A. Conti, right.

2017 Gold Headed Cane Awarded to One Health Initiative Team Member – Dr. Lisa A. Conti 

Dr. Lisa A. Conti received the prestigious American Veterinary Epidemiology Society (AVES) KF Meyer/James H. Steele Gold Headed Cane Award from Dr. Craig N. Carter, current AVES President at the American Veterinary Medical Association convention in Indianapolis, Indiana (USA) on July 24, 2017. 
 
“The award was in recognition of Dr. Conti’s devotion to and achievements in the advancement of animal health, human health and One Health” said Dr. Carter.  He went on to say, “... you are so very deserving.”
 
Dr. Conti https://goo.gl/49F5rz is currently the Deputy Commissioner and Chief Science Officer of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, overseeing the divisions of Food Safety, Agriculture Environmental Services, Aquaculture, Animal Industry, and Plant Industry. Prior appointments were with the Florida Department of Health for 23 years, as Division Director of Environmental Health, Florida State Public Health Veterinarian and State HIV/AIDS Surveillance Coordinator. She has authored or co-authored numerous journal articles on One Health, public health, HIV/AIDS surveillance, vector-borne and zoonotic disease topics. She is Coeditor with prominent One Health physician Dr. Peter Rabinowitz, of the book Human-Animal Medicine: Clinical Approaches to Zoonoses, Toxicants and Other Shared Health Risks https://www.amazon.com/Human-Animal-Medicine-Clinical-Approaches-Toxicants/dp/1416068376  and Co-editor of Confronting Emerging Zoonoses: The One Health Paradigm http://www.springer.com/978-4-431-55119-5.
 
Dr. Conti serves on the NIH National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council. She is a member of the One Health Initiative pro bono team currently comprised of two physicians and two veterinarians. She was a founding member and Chair of the State Environmental Health Directors with the Association of State and Territorial Health Officers. She was a founding member of the Florida Rabies Control and Prevention Advisory Committee, sat on the Rabies Compendium Committee of the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians, was an Executive Board member of the Florida Veterinary Medical Association (FVMA) and established and chaired the FVMA One Health Committee from 1995-2013. Dr. Conti served on the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Public Relations representing Public Health.
 
She was an Affiliate with the Yale University School of Medicine on Human-Animal Medicine projects; an Adjunct Professor at Florida State University having taught Food Safety and Epidemiology courses; Courtesy Associate Professor at the University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine’s Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathology; and, has taught Anatomy and Physiology at Tallahassee Community College.
 
She earned her Doctor of Veterinary Medical degree from the University of Florida, Master of Public Health (Public Health Administration) from the University of South Florida and Bachelor of Science (Chemistry/Math) from the University of Miami. She is a Certified Public Manager through Florida State University, and Board Certified in Preventive Medicine through the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine.
 
Dr. Conti is a recipient of the Florida Public Health Woman of the Year Award and the AVMA Public Service Award.
 
Dr. Terry McElwain was also awarded the KF Meyer/James H. Steele Gold Headed Cane for outstanding leadership and career contributions in epidemiology, public health and One Health.  Dr. McElwain earned his DVM from Kansas State University.  After a short stint in clinical practice in Pennsylvania, he completed a residency in pathology and a PhD in Veterinary Pathology and Microbiology at Washington State University. He is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists.  After serving as an assistant professor of pathology, infectious diseases, and immunology at the University of Florida and Washington State University, he became the Director and Executive Director, of the Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in 1993, and Director of the Animal Health Research Center in 1995, continuing in those roles until his recent retirement. He continues to serve as the Associate Director and Professor of the Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health at Washington State University.  He is a popular scientific speaker and a prolific researcher and writer.  He loves his students and has served on dozens of graduate student committees.  His One Health oriented research in zoonotic diseases is well recognized.  Funded by CDC, he conducted classic studies establishing strategies to prevent zoonotic diseases in Kenya.  He has received many awards and extraordinary recognition in his career to include the AAVLD E.P. Pope Award, Washington State University Faculty Member of the Year Award, AVES Diplomate status, and elected to the National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine.
 
Others awarded an AVES Honorary Diploma for outstanding contributions in epidemiology, public health and One Health with biographical information provided by Dr. Carter included:
 
Dr. Terri Clark received her DVM from Auburn University. After serving 11 years as a US Army Veterinary Corps Officer, she transferred to the National Institutes of Health as a commissioned corps officer in the US Public Health Service.  Currently, she is Director of the Office of Animal Care and Use at the National Institutes of Health.  She is Diplomate of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine.
 
Dr. Jason Johnson received a MS in Biomedical Sciences and a DVM degree both from Auburn University.  After 7 years in practice, he taught 2 years at the Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine at St. Kitt’s, West Indies.  He then joined Lincoln Memorial University as Medical Director of the DeBusk Veterinary Teaching Center, College of Veterinary Medicine.  He also served as Executive Director of the Center for Animal Health in Appalachia.  Next, he became Associate Dean for Clinical Sciences and in 2016, became Dean of the LMU College of Veterinary Medicine.  He is a Diplomate of the American College of Theriogenologists.
 
Dr. Mo Salman received his BVMS degree from the University of Baghdad, Iraq in 1973, his MPVM B.S. degree in Animal Science in 1976 and his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine both from UC Davis.  Currently, he is Professor of Clinical Sciences and Director of the Animal Population Health Institute at Colorado State University.  He has received many awards to include Penn Veterinary World Leadership Award.  He has had a long and distinguished career in veterinary epidemiology and public health and has authored or coauthored over 300 peer reviewed articles and has served as editor of 7 books.    He is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine and has served as President of that organization.  He is also a Fellow of the American College of Epidemiology.
 
Dr. John Gibbins received his DVM degree from The Ohio State University and a MPH from the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences in Bethesda, MD.  After five years in private practice, he has served in various leadership roles of increasing responsibility in the USAF and CDC to include a stint as an Epidemic Intelligence Officer.  He is currently the 11th Chief Veterinary Officer of the United States Public Health Service.  He deployed to Liberia in 2014-2015 as part of the Ebola response team.  He is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine.
 
Dr. Paul Gibbs earned his Bachelor of Veterinary Science (DVM equivalent) and a PhD in Virology from the University of Bristol School of Veterinary Science.  He is a member and a Fellow of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons.  He has worked at the Pirbright Institute as a virology research officer, Professor of Virology and Chief of Microbiology and Parasitology at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine and also served as the Director of the International Center for the University of Florida.   He retired in 2012.  His professional focus has always been on the control and prevention of emerging animal diseases of viral etiology. He received many honors to include the Pioneer in Virology Award from the AAVLD.
 
Dr. Thomas Honadel earned his DVM from Kansas State University, a MPVM from the University of California, a Masters in Strategic Studies, and a MS in Reproductive Physiology from Pennsylvania State University.  He has had a long career as a United States Army Veterinary Corps officer with leadership roles of increasing responsibility, including three command assignments in overseas locations. He is currently Director, Veterinary Services, Army Public Health Center, Aberdeen proving Ground, MD.  He has attained the rank of full Colonel and is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine.
 
Dr. Trevor Ames earned his DVM from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan, Canada and completed a residency in Large Animal Medicine and a MS at the University of Minnesota.  After a stint in practice, he held positions in the Minnesota State Diagnostic Laboratory and later as a Professor of Veterinary Population Medicine with increasing levels of leadership, teaching and research responsibilities.    He is currently Dean and Professor, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota.  He is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.  
 
Note: "Inaugurated by the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society (AVES) in 1964, the Gold Headed Cane Award was approved as an American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) award by the Executive Board in 1996 and is sponsored by Hartz Mountain Corporation, Secaucus, NJ (USA). The award recognizes the achievement of an individual concerned with animal health who has significantly advanced human health through the practice of veterinary epidemiology and public health. Dr. James H. Steele established the award to recognize the outstanding contributions of veterinarian, physician and scientist, Dr. Karl F. Meyer. Originally named the K.F. Meyer Gold Headed Cane Award, it was renamed the K.F. Meyer-James H. Steele Gold Headed Cane Award in 1985 to recognize Dr. Steele for his outstanding contributions to epidemiology and veterinary public health. Today, this award has gained in relevance and stature in concert with AVMA's and many other organizations' endorsement and development of the philosophy of One Health throughout the world."

Craig N. Carter, DVM, PhD, is Director & Professor, Epidemiology of the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Science in the College of Agriculture, Food & the Environment College of Public Health at University of Kentucky in Lexington, KY (USA).  Dr. Carter serves as a member of the One Health Initiative team’s Advisory Board http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/advBoard.php.


American Veterinarian - "AVMA 2017: Insights for One Health from Millenia Past - Tuesday, July 25, 2017

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AVMA 2017: Insights for One Health from Millennia Past

American Veterinarian

“We're all in this together” was the One Health–focused theme of paleontologist and explorer Paul Sereno's keynote address during the 2017 ...

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“Insights for One Health from Centuries and Millennia Past” - Indiana Convention Center, Indianapolis, Indiana July 22, 2017 - Friday, July 21, 2017

Insights for One Health from Centuries and Millennia Past” -  Indiana Convention Center, Indianapolis, Indiana July 22, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. 

Saturday morning American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) convention at July 22, 2017 Keynote Brunch 10 a.m. http://atwork.avma.org/2017/01/27/keynote-speaker-paul-sereno-will-bring-the-past-to-life-at-avma-convention-2017/ at the Indiana Convention Center, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Paul Sereno https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Sereno

 

Keynote speaker Paul Sereno will bring the past to life at AVMA Convention 2017

Attendees at AVMA Convention 2017 will have the opportunity to join renowned paleontologist Paul Sereno at AVMA Convention 2017 for a keynote presentation exploring how the history of the animal world relates to modern veterinary medicine. His keynote brunch address, “Insights for One Health from Centuries and Millennia Past,” promises to bring a modern angle to ancient history.

New developments in genetics, ancient DNA, fossil discoveries, and research into human development are changing our perspective on what actually happened in the past. From human-animal health crises to the timing of evolutionary changes, Sereno will bring ancient history alive to inform our current veterinary work.

Paul Sereno is a National Geographic Explorer and internationally acclaimed professor at the University of Chicago who has explored the Sahara and Gobi Deserts, India’s Thar Desert and remote valleys in Tibet. His work is an exciting blend of art, history and science wrapped in adventure, and we’re excited that he has agreed to give this keynote presentation at AVMA Convention 2017.

The keynote brunch will take place on Saturday, July 22, at 10 A.M., and is open to full convention registrants including veterinarians, technicians, practice staff and students. Guests and exhibitors are invited to attend a viewing party in an alternate location.

Interested in attending AVMA Convention 2017? You can learn more about convention events and CE highlights, and book your hotel room now, at avmaconvention.org. Registration will open in February, so Follow AVMA Convention on Twitter and Facebook for the latest updates.

Note: The American Veterinary Medical Association, founded in 1863, is a not-for-profit association representing more than 89,000 U.S. veterinarians working in private and corporate practice, government, industry, academia, and uniformed services.


“Insights for One Health from Centuries and Millennia Past” - Indianapolis, Indiana July 22, 2017 - Friday, June 23, 2017

Insights for One Health from Centuries and Millennia Past” -  Indiana Convention Center, Indianapolis, Indiana July 22, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. 

Saturday morning American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) convention at July 22, 2017 Keynote Brunch 10 a.m. http://atwork.avma.org/2017/01/27/keynote-speaker-paul-sereno-will-bring-the-past-to-life-at-avma-convention-2017/ at the Indiana Convention Center, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Paul Sereno https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Sereno

Keynote speaker Paul Sereno will bring the past to life at AVMA Convention 2017

Attendees at AVMA Convention 2017 will have the opportunity to join renowned paleontologist Paul Sereno at AVMA Convention 2017 for a keynote presentation exploring how the history of the animal world relates to modern veterinary medicine. His keynote brunch address, “Insights for One Health from Centuries and Millennia Past,” promises to bring a modern angle to ancient history.

New developments in genetics, ancient DNA, fossil discoveries, and research into human development are changing our perspective on what actually happened in the past. From human-animal health crises to the timing of evolutionary changes, Sereno will bring ancient history alive to inform our current veterinary work.

Paul Sereno is a National Geographic Explorer and internationally acclaimed professor at the University of Chicago who has explored the Sahara and Gobi Deserts, India’s Thar Desert and remote valleys in Tibet. His work is an exciting blend of art, history and science wrapped in adventure, and we’re excited that he has agreed to give this keynote presentation at AVMA Convention 2017.

The keynote brunch will take place on Saturday, July 22, at 10 A.M., and is open to full convention registrants including veterinarians, technicians, practice staff and students. Guests and exhibitors are invited to attend a viewing party in an alternate location.

Interested in attending AVMA Convention 2017? You can learn more about convention events and CE highlights, and book your hotel room now, at avmaconvention.org. Registration will open in February, so Follow AVMA Convention on Twitter and Facebook for the latest updates.


Experienced Texas A & M University (USA) One Health Professor Enhances a Dynamic One Health Program - Thursday, June 08, 2017

Experienced Texas A & M University (USA) One Health Professor Enhances a Dynamic One Health Program

 

https://www.onehealthcommission.org/documents/filelibrary/leadership/Krecek_Pic_9112016_8EB32C0AB6188.jpg

Since 2015, Rosina (Tammi) C. Krecek, FRSSAf, BS, MS, PhD, MAP, MBA has been Research Professor of Global One Health and Interim Assistant Dean of One Health at the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM), Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas (USA).  Dr. Krecek works within a dynamic, expanding One Health program under the auspices of an extraordinary CVM Dean, Dr. Eleanor M. Green [DVM, DACVIM, DABVP] http://vetmed.tamu.edu/about-us/dean.  One recent dramatic example of the visionary One Health TAMU activities was demonstrated with a Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs at The Bush School of Government and Public Service report entitled “The Growing Threat of Pandemics: Enhancing Domestic and International Biosecurity - March 2017” https://goo.gl/y9pXo6.  

Krecek has more than 30 years international experience at building sustainable One Health research, education and outreach programs in Africa, the Caribbean and the USA.  Her focus has been a collaborative and interdisciplinary approach for diagnosis and interventions to prevent and manage zoonotic parasitic and infectious diseases which impact resource-poor communities. She established a successful international agricultural consultancy in Sub-Saharan Africa, which addresses societal issues through novel One Health solutions. Two of her overall strengths are establishing international sustainable strategic partnerships, and leading teams to successfully achieve their goals.

In 2005, she was recruited as Associate Dean for Research, and Professor of Parasitology at Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine on St. Kitts to create a research program which was completely lacking.  Krecek established and led a credible and sustainable research program with a One Health focus endorsed by all global, international, national, regional, and island stakeholders (i.e., World Association for Animal Health (OIE), World Health Organization (WHO), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), etc.) Under her research and administrative leadership Ross established a One Health research program with several “firsts”: a Memorandum of Understanding signed between St. Kitts-Nevis Ministries of Agriculture and Human Health and Ross, which strengthened partnerships across diverse disciplines; developed a strategic plan and attracted comprehensive institutional funding to build research and animal facilities, develop operating policies and attract research faculty to support the One Health approach; established the Ross graduate program which was awarded accreditation from the St. Kitts-Nevis Ministry of Education; and awarded funding for the Ross Merial Veterinary Scholars Program. In 2011, as a result of this 6-year strategic effort, Ross achieved accreditation by the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education (AVMA COE) and was awarded a full 7-year accreditation, becoming the first veterinary school in the Caribbean and the 5th foreign school to achieve this global benchmark.

Leading strategic partnerships and working critically in team efforts are proven strengths, as evidenced by the awarding of a 2015 U.S. Department of Homeland Security contract for a novel collaborative multidisciplinary training program. This “Bench to Shop” program (http://vetmed.tamu.edu/benchtoshop) develops an international curriculum for next generation scientists to take bench discoveries for high consequence transboundary diseases to commercialization.

Significant achievements during Krecek’s tenure as Interim Assistant Dean of One Health at Texas A&M held since 2015 have advanced the One Health initiative to the next level (http://onehealth.tamu.edu). This includes 3 recent grant awards for the establishment of new interdisciplinary programs (e.g., comparative genomics of agricultural, animal, human pests and microbes; porcine cysticercosis biosafety and biosecurity international training initiatives including 21 countries, etc.) with several awarded. A critical process has been to compile performance metrics for campus-wide One Health research, demonstrating positive outcomes in various research, education and outreach programs.

Krecek currently serves with distinction on the One Health Commission’s Board of Directors https://www.onehealthcommission.org/en/leadership__board_of_directors/.


Prominent U.S. Tuberculosis Expert and One Health Leader Dies - Saturday, May 13, 2017

Prominent U.S. Tuberculosis Expert and One Health Leader Dies

Dr. Charles O. Thoen, a veterinarian internationally recognized for his extensive knowledge and expertise in the scientific field of tuberculosis and an avid One Health leader/advocate died unexpectedly Monday, May 8, 2017.  Notably, Dr. Thoen earned his PhD degree following a fellowship in microbiology research at the renowned Mayo Clinic graduate school of medicine (1968-1971): University of Minnesota.  He had previously received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree from U of M in 1961.

Dr. Thoen was a valued friend and strong ally of the One Health Initiative Autonomous Pro Bono team.  This brilliant, kind and decent man shall be sorely missed by his friends, colleagues and the global public health scientific world.

A fitting in memoriam to him and for his family, is the following beautifully prepared pertinent article:

Iowa State University – College of Veterinary Medicine https://vetmed.iastate.edu/story/charles-thoen

 

A Man Among Beasts

Dr. Charles Thoen

Editor's Note: It is with great sadness that we report the death of Dr. Charles Thoen, professor of veterinary microbiology and preventive medicine, on Monday, May 8, 2017.

During his half-century- long career in veterinary medicine, Dr. Charles Thoen has worked with food- producing animals, companion animals, nonhuman primates, elk, buffalo and even elephants. Early in his career he was a veterinary medical epidemiologist for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). He later chaired the department of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine at Iowa State University, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease Scientific Committee on Tuberculosis in Animals, and World Health Organization Committee on Animal Tuberculosis.

He’s been a consultant to the Smithsonian Institution, National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Pan American Health Organization, National Aquarium in Baltimore, International Elephant Foundation, and agricultural departments in the United States and countries including Egypt, New Zealand, South Africa, Colombia and Serbia.

Dr. Thoen has served as president of the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society and was invited by the World Veterinary Association to provide content for its educational portal on tuberculosis (TB) in animals and humans. In 2014 he received the Distinguished Research Alumnus award from the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine for his accomplishments on TB and clinically significant pathogenic mycobacteria. He’s been an editor of seven textbooks on infectious disease that are used by scientists worldwide.

He credits his training at Mayo Clinic for providing him with research skills, and a childhood pet for sparking his lifelong interest in infectious diseases in animals and humans.

Dr. Thoen grew up on a farm in Harmony−Lanesboro, Minnesota. When his dog, Trixie, contracted an infectious disease and died, the 10-year-old boy wanted to learn more about what killed his pet. He talked to the local veterinarian and “was hooked,” he says.

Dr. Thoen recently edited the third edition of Zoonotic Tuberculosis: Mycobacterium bovis and Other Pathogenic Mycobacteria, a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art control and elimination of infections caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in animals and humans.

Intermingling of the species

“Infectious diseases can be transmitted from animals to humans, and from humans back to animals,” says Dr. Thoen. TB in particular causes disease in humans, elephants and several nonhuman primates. He says this information is especially important because TB is a re-emerging disease in both humans and animals worldwide and is a risk when they intermingle.

“Advanced TB is highly contagious and a significant concern to public health officials,” says Dr. Thoen. “Molecular techniques can trace outbreaks, including genotyping the TB organisms to identify strains and determine if isolates from human patients are similar to those of animals they were exposed to — or vice versa. If the isolates are the same, we can suspect transmission from one species to another, which helps identify the source of infection.”

Employees at animal parks and animal training centers have contracted the disease from elephants and primates. TB isn’t common among U.S. cattle but does occur in cattle imported from Mexico, exposing domestic cattle to the disease.

“Suspected animals are tested, but they only shed the organism in advanced stages of disease, so tests have limitations,” he says. “Public health officials are very concerned about animal-to-human transmission. People who come in contact with elephants may be at risk of contracting TB. Infected animals that expel air in proximity to people can infect them. Some studies show that 13 percent of captive elephants are infected with TB.”

Elephant man

When TB was first diagnosed in captive elephants in 1996, Dr. Thoen worked with a national group of elephant owners and the USDA to set up guidelines for testing, treatment and monitoring the disease. It was the start of 20 years of working with elephants. Some of his trainees became pioneers in the process of collecting samples for testing from the inside of the animals’ trunks — similar to a sputum sample. His team also determined the drug treatment protocols for elephants infected with TB.

“Initially the drug is given orally in grape juice, but elephants quickly lose interest in it,” he says. “We developed a suppository pack, which is now the standard treatment for uncooperative elephants.”

Costly treatment — in dollars and death

Some strains of TB in both humans and animals are resistant to two or more first-line drugs, and others are resistant to multiple drugs. The cost of treating TB is considerable. According to Dr. Thoen, in humans it’s $20,000 for a normal strain of TB and $135,000 to $400,000 for drug- resistant strains, with no guarantee — drug-resistant cases are often fatal. Treating infected animals is just as costly — $100,000 over 18 months for an elephant and as much as $400,000 if it is extensively drug-resistant.

“When an outbreak occurs in other animal populations, we don’t treat the disease,” says Dr. Thoen. “Instead, we remove the animals from the population and do follow- up tests for three and five or more years in those who were exposed.”

Dr. Thoen points out that when TB occurs in developing countries, it’s often not treated in humans, let alone animals, due to the high cost, which contributes to the spread of the disease. Some experts fear TB in animals could lead to the extinction of endangered species.

Dr. Thoen is an advocate for the One Health initiative and has authored content on its educational portal. One Health recognizes that human health, animal health and the environment are inextricably linked and encourages worldwide interdisciplinary collaboration in health care for humans, animals and the environment to defend the health and well-being of all species.

“Tuberculosis doesn’t know if it’s in an animal or a human and doesn’t care who it infects next,” he says. “We need better diagnostic tests and procedures.”

Reprinted from Mayo Clinic Alumni Magazine, Issue 3, pp 28 to 30.  2016. electronic Alumni magazine


First Physician in History to Serve on American Veterinary Epidemiology Society (AVES) Board - Tuesday, May 02, 2017

First Physician in History to Serve on American Veterinary Epidemiology Society (AVES) Board

May 1, 2017 -- The American Veterinary Epidemiology Society’s (AVES) http://www.avesociety.org/current President and Executive Director, Dr. Craig N. Carter formerly announced today that Dr. Laura H. Kahn http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/LauraKahnBiography%20Feb%202015.pdf accepted an appointment serving on the AVES board of directors.  Dr. Kahn will be the first physician in the history of AVES to serve on the board.  Kahn received the AVES’ highest honor, the prestigious “Gold Headed Cane” award at the American Veterinary Medical Association’s (AVMA) annual meeting/convention in San Antonio, Texas (USA) on August 8, 2016 https://goo.gl/GG2mpC.  She is a co-founder of the One Health Initiative team (2006-7) and website (October 2008) https://goo.gl/yEXH5N.  

Dr. Carter also announced the inclusion on the AVES Executive Board of the prominent and extraordinary veterinarian, Dr. W. Ron DeHaven https://www.avma.org/About/Governance/Leadership/Pages/AVMA-Officers-Dr-W-Ron-DeHaven.aspx, a retired CEO and Executive Vice President of the AVMA.  DeHaven retired from his position with AVMA in 2016.  Prior to that he spent more than two decades with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, most recently as the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) administrator and chief veterinary officer for the United States.  DeHaven was also a recipient of the AVES Gold Headed Cane Award on August 8, 2016.

With the additions of Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP and W. Ron DeHaven, DVM, MBA, the AVES board is now comprised of President Craig N. Carter, DVM, PhD http://goo.gl/n4wi3s, Immediate Past President, Charles O. Thoen, DVM, PhD https://goo.gl/F6bJ9s, Past President, Lonnie King, DVM, MS, MPA http://goo.gl/T8jb8T, Saul T. Wilson, DVM, MPH https://goo.gl/QWMAfO, Bruce Kaplan, DVM http://goo.gl/KujQkP, and William Stokes, DVM http://goo.gl/IqVy8d. 

About these recent appointments, Dr. Carter said, “we  are extremely proud to announce that these two new Board members were appointed during our last meeting on April 18, 2017.  Dr. Ron DeHaven’s many years of creative and strong governmental and AVMA leadership experience will be extremely valuable in furthering the goals and mission of the AVES.”  Carter noted that, “physician Dr. Laura Kahn, is a co-founding member of the One Health Initiative and has recently released a book entitled One Health and the Politics of Antimicrobial Resistance published by the Johns Hopkins University Press which explores the realities of how antimicrobial resistance poses a major risk to both human and animal health”.  Carter said, “Kahn’s devotion to the One Health philosophy makes her a perfect fit to serve on the AVES Board of Directors.  Both DeHaven and Kahn will significantly help in our goals of improving animal health, human health, epidemiology and One Health.”


 
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