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Gold Headed Cane Awarded to One Health Initiative Team Member – Dr. Lisa A. Conti - Monday, July 31, 2017

Dr. Craig N. Carter, left presenting American Veterinary Epidemiology Society (AVES) Gold Headed Cane to Dr. Lisa A. Conti, right.

2017 Gold Headed Cane Awarded to One Health Initiative Team Member – Dr. Lisa A. Conti 

Dr. Lisa A. Conti received the prestigious American Veterinary Epidemiology Society (AVES) KF Meyer/James H. Steele Gold Headed Cane Award from Dr. Craig N. Carter, current AVES President at the American Veterinary Medical Association convention in Indianapolis, Indiana (USA) on July 24, 2017. 
 
“The award was in recognition of Dr. Conti’s devotion to and achievements in the advancement of animal health, human health and One Health” said Dr. Carter.  He went on to say, “... you are so very deserving.”
 
Dr. Conti https://goo.gl/49F5rz is currently the Deputy Commissioner and Chief Science Officer of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, overseeing the divisions of Food Safety, Agriculture Environmental Services, Aquaculture, Animal Industry, and Plant Industry. Prior appointments were with the Florida Department of Health for 23 years, as Division Director of Environmental Health, Florida State Public Health Veterinarian and State HIV/AIDS Surveillance Coordinator. She has authored or co-authored numerous journal articles on One Health, public health, HIV/AIDS surveillance, vector-borne and zoonotic disease topics. She is Coeditor with prominent One Health physician Dr. Peter Rabinowitz, of the book Human-Animal Medicine: Clinical Approaches to Zoonoses, Toxicants and Other Shared Health Risks https://www.amazon.com/Human-Animal-Medicine-Clinical-Approaches-Toxicants/dp/1416068376  and Co-editor of Confronting Emerging Zoonoses: The One Health Paradigm http://www.springer.com/978-4-431-55119-5.
 
Dr. Conti serves on the NIH National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council. She is a member of the One Health Initiative pro bono team currently comprised of two physicians and two veterinarians. She was a founding member and Chair of the State Environmental Health Directors with the Association of State and Territorial Health Officers. She was a founding member of the Florida Rabies Control and Prevention Advisory Committee, sat on the Rabies Compendium Committee of the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians, was an Executive Board member of the Florida Veterinary Medical Association (FVMA) and established and chaired the FVMA One Health Committee from 1995-2013. Dr. Conti served on the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Public Relations representing Public Health.
 
She was an Affiliate with the Yale University School of Medicine on Human-Animal Medicine projects; an Adjunct Professor at Florida State University having taught Food Safety and Epidemiology courses; Courtesy Associate Professor at the University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine’s Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathology; and, has taught Anatomy and Physiology at Tallahassee Community College.
 
She earned her Doctor of Veterinary Medical degree from the University of Florida, Master of Public Health (Public Health Administration) from the University of South Florida and Bachelor of Science (Chemistry/Math) from the University of Miami. She is a Certified Public Manager through Florida State University, and Board Certified in Preventive Medicine through the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine.
 
Dr. Conti is a recipient of the Florida Public Health Woman of the Year Award and the AVMA Public Service Award.
 
Dr. Terry McElwain was also awarded the KF Meyer/James H. Steele Gold Headed Cane for outstanding leadership and career contributions in epidemiology, public health and One Health.  Dr. McElwain earned his DVM from Kansas State University.  After a short stint in clinical practice in Pennsylvania, he completed a residency in pathology and a PhD in Veterinary Pathology and Microbiology at Washington State University. He is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists.  After serving as an assistant professor of pathology, infectious diseases, and immunology at the University of Florida and Washington State University, he became the Director and Executive Director, of the Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in 1993, and Director of the Animal Health Research Center in 1995, continuing in those roles until his recent retirement. He continues to serve as the Associate Director and Professor of the Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health at Washington State University.  He is a popular scientific speaker and a prolific researcher and writer.  He loves his students and has served on dozens of graduate student committees.  His One Health oriented research in zoonotic diseases is well recognized.  Funded by CDC, he conducted classic studies establishing strategies to prevent zoonotic diseases in Kenya.  He has received many awards and extraordinary recognition in his career to include the AAVLD E.P. Pope Award, Washington State University Faculty Member of the Year Award, AVES Diplomate status, and elected to the National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine.
 
Others awarded an AVES Honorary Diploma for outstanding contributions in epidemiology, public health and One Health with biographical information provided by Dr. Carter included:
 
Dr. Terri Clark received her DVM from Auburn University. After serving 11 years as a US Army Veterinary Corps Officer, she transferred to the National Institutes of Health as a commissioned corps officer in the US Public Health Service.  Currently, she is Director of the Office of Animal Care and Use at the National Institutes of Health.  She is Diplomate of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine.
 
Dr. Jason Johnson received a MS in Biomedical Sciences and a DVM degree both from Auburn University.  After 7 years in practice, he taught 2 years at the Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine at St. Kitt’s, West Indies.  He then joined Lincoln Memorial University as Medical Director of the DeBusk Veterinary Teaching Center, College of Veterinary Medicine.  He also served as Executive Director of the Center for Animal Health in Appalachia.  Next, he became Associate Dean for Clinical Sciences and in 2016, became Dean of the LMU College of Veterinary Medicine.  He is a Diplomate of the American College of Theriogenologists.
 
Dr. Mo Salman received his BVMS degree from the University of Baghdad, Iraq in 1973, his MPVM B.S. degree in Animal Science in 1976 and his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine both from UC Davis.  Currently, he is Professor of Clinical Sciences and Director of the Animal Population Health Institute at Colorado State University.  He has received many awards to include Penn Veterinary World Leadership Award.  He has had a long and distinguished career in veterinary epidemiology and public health and has authored or coauthored over 300 peer reviewed articles and has served as editor of 7 books.    He is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine and has served as President of that organization.  He is also a Fellow of the American College of Epidemiology.
 
Dr. John Gibbins received his DVM degree from The Ohio State University and a MPH from the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences in Bethesda, MD.  After five years in private practice, he has served in various leadership roles of increasing responsibility in the USAF and CDC to include a stint as an Epidemic Intelligence Officer.  He is currently the 11th Chief Veterinary Officer of the United States Public Health Service.  He deployed to Liberia in 2014-2015 as part of the Ebola response team.  He is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine.
 
Dr. Paul Gibbs earned his Bachelor of Veterinary Science (DVM equivalent) and a PhD in Virology from the University of Bristol School of Veterinary Science.  He is a member and a Fellow of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons.  He has worked at the Pirbright Institute as a virology research officer, Professor of Virology and Chief of Microbiology and Parasitology at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine and also served as the Director of the International Center for the University of Florida.   He retired in 2012.  His professional focus has always been on the control and prevention of emerging animal diseases of viral etiology. He received many honors to include the Pioneer in Virology Award from the AAVLD.
 
Dr. Thomas Honadel earned his DVM from Kansas State University, a MPVM from the University of California, a Masters in Strategic Studies, and a MS in Reproductive Physiology from Pennsylvania State University.  He has had a long career as a United States Army Veterinary Corps officer with leadership roles of increasing responsibility, including three command assignments in overseas locations. He is currently Director, Veterinary Services, Army Public Health Center, Aberdeen proving Ground, MD.  He has attained the rank of full Colonel and is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine.
 
Dr. Trevor Ames earned his DVM from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan, Canada and completed a residency in Large Animal Medicine and a MS at the University of Minnesota.  After a stint in practice, he held positions in the Minnesota State Diagnostic Laboratory and later as a Professor of Veterinary Population Medicine with increasing levels of leadership, teaching and research responsibilities.    He is currently Dean and Professor, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota.  He is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.  
 
Note: "Inaugurated by the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society (AVES) in 1964, the Gold Headed Cane Award was approved as an American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) award by the Executive Board in 1996 and is sponsored by Hartz Mountain Corporation, Secaucus, NJ (USA). The award recognizes the achievement of an individual concerned with animal health who has significantly advanced human health through the practice of veterinary epidemiology and public health. Dr. James H. Steele established the award to recognize the outstanding contributions of veterinarian, physician and scientist, Dr. Karl F. Meyer. Originally named the K.F. Meyer Gold Headed Cane Award, it was renamed the K.F. Meyer-James H. Steele Gold Headed Cane Award in 1985 to recognize Dr. Steele for his outstanding contributions to epidemiology and veterinary public health. Today, this award has gained in relevance and stature in concert with AVMA's and many other organizations' endorsement and development of the philosophy of One Health throughout the world."

Craig N. Carter, DVM, PhD, is Director & Professor, Epidemiology of the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Science in the College of Agriculture, Food & the Environment College of Public Health at University of Kentucky in Lexington, KY (USA).  Dr. Carter serves as a member of the One Health Initiative team’s Advisory Board http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/advBoard.php.


An Exemplary One Health Leader – Dean Michael D. Lairmore, UC Davis (USA) - Friday, June 16, 2017

An Exemplary One Health Leader – Dean Michael D. Lairmore, UC Davis (USA)

Noted by American College of Veterinary Pathologists

One Health

Posted in Fact Sheets https://goo.gl/rByYZW

With increasing awareness of the inter-relatedness of human and veterinary health as well as the ecosystem, a collaborative initiative is underway incorporating veterinarians, physicians, public and environmental health experts, and researchers to advance health care across all areas. Veterinary pathologists, with unique expertise in comparative and translational medicine, have an important role in One Health. 

Michael D. Lairmore, DVM, PhD, DACVP, DACVM, is the dean of the U.C. Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and a veterinary pathologist who has been involved in the One Health initiative [movement] since its beginning. Learn more about his career-long work with One Health. 

Michael Lairmore, DVM, PhD

Dr. Michael D. Lairmore

See: http://www.acvp.org/PDF/One_Health_Story_for_ACVP_FINAL.pdf

 

And more good One Health advice from UC Davis’s outstanding One Health program:

 

7 Tips for a Healthy Home From the One Health Perspective

https://www.ucdavis.edu/one-health/healthy-home

UC Davis

Small advances in science, medicine and engineering have everyday impacts. Here are seven easy actions to improve animal, human and ...

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One Health Lecture: Physicians, Farmers, and the Politics of Antimicrobial Resistance (recording) - March 21, 2017 - Iowa State University (USA) - Thursday, March 23, 2017

“Excellent presentation and exciting day for all of us.”

      *Claire B. Andreasen, DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVP—

Please listen to recorded session now available:

https://vetmed.iastate.edu/event/one-health-lecture-physicians-farmers-and-politics-antimicrobial-resistance

One Health Lecture: Physicians, Farmers, and the Politics of Antimicrobial Resistance

Tuesday, March 21, 2017
5:30 pm  2226 Vet Med

Click link to recorded session
 

Dr. Laura Kahn

Presented by **Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP
Princeton University

Dr. Kahn holds a B.S. degree in nursing from UCLA, an M.D. from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, an MPH from Columbia University, and a Master of Public Policy from Princeton University.  She is a research scholar with the Program on Science and Global Security at Princeton University. Dr. Kahn is a fellow of the American College of Physicians (ACP) and is a recipient of the New Jersey Chapter’s Laureate Award.  At the 2016 AVMA meeting, Dr. Kahn was awarded the Karl F. Meyer–James H. Steele Gold Headed Cane Award for her lifetime contributions to public health and One Health. She currently teaches, “Hogs, Bats, and Ebola: An Introduction to One Health Policy” to Princeton University freshmen. Her most recent book, One Health and the Politics of Antimicrobial Resistance, was published in June 2016 by Johns Hopkins University Press.

The One Health Lecture Series was established in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Iowa State University in honor of Dr. Roger Mahr, DVM Class of 1971 [see https://goo.gl/H9Bfbm]

Note: *Dr. Andreasen is Professor, Department of Veterinary Pathology and Director of the One Health program https://vetmed.iastate.edu/research-grad-studies/centers-institutes-and-initiatives/one-health at the College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University in Ames, IA (USA).

**Dr. Kahn is a co-founding member of the One Health Initiative team [April 2006] and One Health Initiative website www.onehealthinitiative.com [October 2008].


Extraordinary One Health Leaders Awarded American Veterinary Epidemiology Society (AVES) Gold Headed Cane (USA) Awards Today: A prominent physician and two notable veterinarians - Monday, August 08, 2016

Left to right:  Physician Dr. Laura H. Kahn and Veterinarian Dr. Craig N. Carter, President, American Veterinary Epidemiology Society (AVES)

 

Extraordinary One Health Leaders Awarded American Veterinary Epidemiology Society (AVES) Gold Headed Cane (USA) Awards Today: A prominent physician and two notable veterinarians

Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP received the prestigious American Veterinary Epidemiology Society (AVES) Gold Headed Cane Award at the August 2016 annual American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) convention in San Antonio, Texas (USA) on August 8, 2016 at a breakfast ceremony.   The AVMA, founded in 1863, is one of the oldest and largest veterinary medical organizations in the world, with more than 86,500 member veterinarians worldwide engaged in a wide variety of professional activities and dedicated to the art and science of veterinary medicine.

An internationally renowned One Health physician, Dr. Kahn was a co-founder of the *One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono Team (OHI team) and the One Health Initiative website www.onehealthinitiative.com.  Kahn’s One Health colleagues of the OHI team, currently comprised of two physicians and two veterinarians, are the managers and creators of the One Health Initiative website.  The highly successful “One Health Initiative” website, frequently dubbed "the international clearing house for significant One Health information" and by some the "New York Times of One Health.", came to fruition on October 1, 2008.  See http://www.solutions-site.org/node/875 and http://goo.gl/s23bvb.

Kahn recently published her long awaited book via The Johns Hopkins University Press entitled “One Health and the Politics of Antimicrobial Resistance” this month (August) https://jhupbooks.press.jhu.edu/content/one-health-and-politics-antimicrobial-resistance.

W. Ron DeHaven, DVM, MBA https://goo.gl/MP7FzJ, an extraordinary retiring Executive Vice President of the American Veterinary Medical Association, was one of the two notable veterinarians to receive the AVES Gold Headed Cane Award. 

Russell W. Currier, DVM, MPH https://goo.gl/PBpt05, a Diplomate of the American College for Veterinary Preventive Medicine, retired from a remarkable career as an Iowa State Public Health Veterinarian also received the AVES Gold Headed Cane Award along with Drs. Kahn and DeHavenDr. Currier currently presides as President of the American Veterinary Medical History Society.

Inaugurated by AVES in 1964, the Gold Headed Cane Award was approved as an AVMA award by the Executive Board in 1996 and is sponsored by Hartz Mountain Corporation, Secaucus, NJ (USA). The award recognizes the achievement of an individual concerned with animal health who has significantly advanced human health through the practice of veterinary epidemiology and public health. Dr. James H. Steele [DVM, MPH], founder of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) veterinary division in 1947 http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/news.php?query=james+h.+steele%2C+dvm%2C+mph, established the award to recognize the outstanding contributions of veterinarian, physician and scientist, Dr. Karl F. Meyer [DVM, PhD, MD (Hon.)]. Originally named the K.F. Meyer Gold Headed Cane Award, it was renamed the K.F. Meyer-James H. Steele Gold Headed Cane Award in 1985 to recognize Steele for his outstanding contributions to epidemiology and veterinary public health. Today, this award has gained in relevance and stature in concert with AVMA's and many other health oriented organizations' endorsement and development of the philosophy of One Health throughout the world.

In addition to Drs. Kahn, DeHaven and Currier receiving the prestigious K.F. Meyer-James H. Steele Gold-Headed Cane Award, Honorary AVES Diplomas were awarded to: Alan Beck, ScD https://goo.gl/QVDATW, Stephen A. Berger, MD (Tel-Aviv, ISRAEL - http://www.gideononline.com/about/team/), Norman F. Cheville, DVM, PhD https://goo.gl/hUohUs, Peter J. Costa, MPH https://goo.gl/vrmfI9, Wondwossen A. Gebreyes, DVM, PhD https://goo.gl/okmjjs, Cynthia Hoobler, DVM, MPH http://goo.gl/T0QtK9, Michele Jay-Russell, DVM, MPVM, PhD http://goo.gl/atbTN, Brian J. McCluskey, DVM, PhD http://goo.gl/CZ2T9X, Stephanie R. Miles-Richardson, DVM, PhD http://goo.gl/G1jFPR, and Brigadier General Erik H. Torring III, DVM, MPH http://goo.gl/NML4fO.

The AVES board is comprised of President, Craig N. Carter, DVM, PhD http://goo.gl/n4wi3s, Immediate Past President, Charles O. Thoen, DVM, PhD https://goo.gl/F6bJ9s, Lonnie King, DVM, MS, MPA http://goo.gl/T8jb8T, George W. Beran, DVM, PhD http://goo.gl/JRPZ07; Saul T. Wilson, DVM, MPH https://goo.gl/QWMAfO, Bruce Kaplan, DVM http://goo.gl/KujQkP and William Stokes, DVM http://goo.gl/IqVy8d.  

Note: Information regarding these award presentations was graciously provided by:

Georgette D. Wilson, DVM
Director, Scientific & Medical Affairs
The Hartz Mountain Corporation
400 Plaza Drive
Secaucus, NJ  07094
Ph: (201)- 271-4800 ext. 7711
gwilson@hartz.com 

 


Speaker Treasure Trove at 2nd International Conference on One Medicine One Science, April 24-27, 2016 – University of Minnesota (USA) - Saturday, April 23, 2016

Speaker Treasure Trove at 2nd International Conference on One Medicine One Science, April 24-27, 2016 – University of Minnesota (USA)

http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications.php?query=2nd+International+Conference+on+One+Medicine+One+Science+-+April+24-27%2C+2016

 

Ann Bancroft https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ann_Bancroft and http://www.britannica.com/biography/Ann-Bancroft will be the noon speaker at the conference on Tuesday, April 26. She is the first woman to cross the ice to both the North and South Poles. She has recently traveled the length of the Ganges River as part of multi-year enterprise to thoughtfully explore water use through the lens of rural and urban communities. She will bring an unique personal perspective to “Water at the Interface of Health, Economics and Environment” as she takes the audience on a journey exploring the Arctic and Antarctic, and the Ganges River from source to sea, and illuminates the impact of climate change on polar icecaps and fresh water issues facing our planet.

 

Michael Osterholm, PhD, MPH, http://sph.umn.edu/faculty1/name/michael-osterholm/ is well known for calling attention to the changing epidemiology of foodborne diseases, the association of tampons and toxic shock syndrome, hepatitis B transmission in health care settings, and HIV infection in healthcare workers. He is an international leader for preparedness before pandemics occur and on the use of biological agents as catastrophic weapons targeting civilian populations. His plenary presentation, "Turning Science into Policy; Minimizing Chaos and Maximizing Impact," will emphasize the critical role of science in making sound health policies for animals and humans. He is Regents Professor, McKnight Presidential Endowed Chair in Public Health, Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, member of the National Academy of Medicine, the Council of Foreign Relations, and the National Science Advisory Board on Biosecurity. 

Note: Dr. Osterholm is also a member of the One Health Initiative team’s Honorary Advisory Board http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/advBoard.php.

Arthur Caplan, PhD, http://www.med.nyu.edu/pophealth/faculty/caplaa01 is a medical ethicist and philosopher renowned for key public policy contributions to establishment of U.S. national policies in human tissue and organ procurement, blood safety, and compassionate use. His presentation on “Ethics of Personalized Medicine Versus Public Health," will explore the dilemma of public funds distribution for health investments that provide individual benefits to the few versus potential benefits for the many. Dr. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Bioethics at New York University Langone Medical Center in New York City and the head of the ethics program in the Global Institute for Public Health at NYU. 

Elaine Ostrander, PhD, http://irp.nih.gov/pi/elaine-ostrander is best known for genetic studies of the domestic dog that offer unique opportunities for solving human health conditions and fundamental biological problems. Her presentation on "The Science behind Personalized Medicine: Mapping Complex Traits and Diseases," will present foundational knowledge showing how medical research in the canine benefits both dogs and humans. Dr. Ostrander is chief of the Cancer Genetics and Comparative Genomics Branch at the National Human Genome Research Institute of NIH.  She has won multiple awards including the American Cancer Society Junior Faculty Award, Burroughs Welcome Award for Functional Genomics, Asa Mays Award, Lifetime Achievement Awards for both her prostate cancer and canine genetics work, and in the 2013 Genetics Society of America Medal.

Adam Berger, PhD http://www.nationalacademies.org/hmd/Global/Directory/Combo.aspx?staffid=%7BD72B4020-75A5-4DC8-9532-F3BE34B4ECD6%7D&memberid=0020021628: Presentation title: US President’s Precision Medicine Initiative—HHS Overview

Adam Berger is a Senior Fellow in the Immediate Office of the Secretary of Health and Human Services. His primary interests focus on policy issues relating to translational medicine, including the development of drug, diagnostic, and clinical and public health applications. He will present an overview of the U.S. President’s Precision Medicine Initiative. Dr. Berger has facilitated numerous public policy discussions and reports on application of genetic and genomic technologies to medical practice.  He is the recipient of the NIH Fellows Award for Research Excellence and a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award.

Arden Pope, PhD, http://fhssfaculty.byu.edu/facultypage.aspx?id=cap3: Dr. Pope’s seminal economics research on health impacts and costs of air pollution resulted in the current U.S. laws and regulations governing clean air. As one of the world’s most widely cited and recognized experts on the health effects of air pollution, his presentation on air pollution, health and policy is a must-hear for all air breathers. He is the Mary Lou Fulton Professor of Economics at Brigham Young University and was a Fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health. His awards include the Thomas T. Mercer Joint Prize from the American Association for Aerosol Research and the International Society for Aerosols in Medicine, the Utah Governor’s Medal for Science & Technology, Honorary Fellow of the American College of Chest Physicians, and International Society for Environmental Epidemiology Best Environmental Epidemiology Paper Award.

Provided by: 

Michael Murtaugh, PhD, Professor

http://www.cvm.umn.edu/academic-departments/vbs/faculty/MichaelMurtaugh/index.htm

Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences

University of Minnesota (USA)

612 625 6735

iCOMOS www.icomos.umn.edu


One Health: the Balance between Animal and Human Health - August 21, 2013 - Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Halley Faust Comments

Finding the right balance in contemporary issues

 

http://halleyfaust.wordpress.com/

 

 August 21, 2013 – 1:31 pmAnimal-Human MedicinePrevention | Post a comment

 

 

*Halley S. Faust, MD, MPH, MA

President

American College of Preventive Medicine

1260 Vallecita Drive
Santa Fe, NM 87501

Voice: 505-501-8181 FREE

hfaust@jeromecapital.com

@onHealthPolicy

Blog: www.halleycomments.com

Animals and humans interact in many more ways than we think about in domestic suburbia.  Sure, we know that animal farmers are constantly in contact with their produce, and we are happy to pet our domestic cats and dogs.  Sure we recognize that some wild animals get rabies or, here in the desert of New Mexico, occasionally someone comes down with plague because of flea bites from infected indigenous rodents (our first case of this year was just last week).  And we’ve all heard of bird flu.

Yet there are many more ways that animals and humans interact that can compromise the health of individuals or populations.  In an excellent summary article, “Links among Human Health, Animal Health, and Ecosystem Health” Peter Rabinowitz and Lisa Conti from the Yale School of Medicine discuss how small-scale animal agriculture, human migration patterns and travel, animal worker practices, housing and land use development, changes in indigenous wildlife species, toxic hazards like the mercury poisoning in Minimata, Japan, and climate change impact animal and human health synergistically.

In 2007 the American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM) Policy Committee, of which I was a member and former Chair, passed a resolution introduced by the late Ron Davis urging the American Medical Association to “support an initiative designed to promote collaboration between human and veterinary medicine…encourage joint efforts in clinical care through the assessment, treatment, and prevention of cross-species disease transmission…AMA support cross-species disease surveillance and control efforts in public health…support joint efforts in the development and evaluation of new diagnostic methods, medicines, and vaccines for the prevention and control of diseases across species…[and] engage in a dialogue with the American Veterinary Medical Association to discuss strategies for enhancing collaboration between the medical and veterinary medical professions in medical education, clinical care, public health, and biomedical research.”

The AMA passed this resolution and has been a leader in encouraging the consideration of these issues.  The American College of Preventive Medicine has recently participated in a One Health capitol hill briefing and renewed its endorsement of the One Health initiative.  However, the greatest push to understand and deal with animal-human medical interactions has come from the veterinary community.  The medical community has been relatively quiescent on the issue unless an epidemic occurs.  When one looks at the One Health Commission there are only two MD individual members of the Board of Directors, and only one MD on the Council of Advisers.  (There are twelve on the honorary advisory board of the One Health Initiative.)

Who are the MD leaders concerned about this issue?  Mostly they are epidemiologists, infectious disease specialists, or ag-related occupational medicine specialists.  Two out of three of these specialists are under the medical specialty of preventive medicine.  There aren’t very many of us trained in preventive medicine.  The Institute of Medicine in 2007 estimated there are about 10,000 in the US and that we’d need another 10,000 over the next few years.  To quote from a report from ACPM:

  • Between 1999 and 2006, the number of residents enrolled in preventive medicine training programs declined nearly 20%, and in 2007-08 less than half of the approved number of residency positions were filled.
  • The number of preventive medicine residency programs decreased from 90 in 1999 to 71 in 2008-2009.

These trends have not abated.  The demand for such residencies has not decreased – it has always been high according to preventive medicine residency directors.  The problem is funding – preventive medicine is the one specialty not consistently mostly supported by the federal government.  Hence for those residency programs in existence, most can only find funding to fill half of their slots (and many approved residencies’ doors aren’t even open).

For human medicine to be fully engaged in the One Health initiative we need more human medicine physicians to be engaged in preventive medicine, which means more federal funding for residencies.  But as with prevention in general, western society tends to provide less than what is needed in the balance with treatment.

*One Health endorsement statement provided and posted to One Health Initiative website by ACPM President, Dr. Halley S. Faust August 18, 2013 http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/American%20College%20of%20Preventive%20Medicine%20One%20Health%20Endorsement%20August%2018%202013.doc.pdf

  

“The American College of Preventive Medicine http://www.acpm.org/ has had a long-standing commitment in support of activities that advance the One Health Initiative; indeed, we spearheaded the successful passage of the One Health AMA resolution in 2007. As preventive medicine physicians with unique training in clinical medicine and public health, we recognize that human and animal medicine are inextricably linked. We are pleased to offer our strong endorsement of the One Health initiative, fostering greater collaboration between human and animal medicine to improve population health. We look forward to our continued engagement in this effort.”


American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM) Physicians Endorse One Health - August 18, 2013 - Tuesday, August 20, 2013

American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM) Physicians Endorse One Health

 

One Health endorsement statement provided to One Health Initiative website by ACPM President, Dr. Halley S. Faust August 18, 2013 http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/American%20College%20of%20Preventive%20Medicine%20One%20Health%20Endorsement%20August%2018%202013.doc.pdf

 

 

“The American College of Preventive Medicine http://www.acpm.org/ has had a long-standing commitment in support of activities that advance the One Health Initiative; indeed, we spearheaded the successful passage of the One Health AMA resolution in 2007. As preventive medicine physicians with unique training in clinical medicine and public health, we recognize that human and animal medicine are inextricably linked. We are pleased to offer our strong endorsement of the One Health initiative, fostering greater collaboration between human and animal medicine to improve population health. We look forward to our continued engagement in this effort.”

 

Halley S. Faust, MD, MPH, MA

President

American College of Preventive Medicine

1260 Vallecita Drive
Santa Fe, NM 87501
Voice: 505-501-8181

hfaust@jeromecapital.com

@OnHealthPolicy

blog: www.halleycomments.com

 

__________________________________

 

Footnote: About ACPM http://www.acpm.org/?WhoWeAre

 

Founded in 1954, the American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM) is a professional, medical society of more than 2,700 members employed in research, academia, government, clinical settings, and other entities worldwide. ACPM provides a dynamic forum for the exchange of knowledge among preventive medicine specialists, and offers high-quality educational programs for continuing medical education (CME) and maintenance of certification (MOC), information and resources for ongoing professional development, and networking opportunities.

ACPM's Mission

As the leader for the specialty of Preventive Medicine and physicians dedicated to prevention, ACPM improves the health of individuals and populations through evidence-based health promotion, disease prevention, and systems-based approaches to improving health and health care.

Strategic Goals and Organizational Objectives (in brief)

1. Promote the specialty of Preventive Medicine and Preventive Medicine physicians to assure an appropriate supply and demand of properly trained physicians to deliver effective and efficient health and health care.

2. Promote the advancement of scientific knowledge in preventive medicine and establish ACPM as the recognized leader for professional, multi-disciplinary, and public education, collaboration and communication in the areas of preventive medicine and public health.

3. Enhance member value by serving as the primary source for members to meet their professional needs, including but not limited to CME, MOC, MOL, career development and practice tools.

4. Maintain and enhance the institutional stature and credibility of ACPM, professionally, financially, and politically, in order to maximally achieve its mission and goals.


One Health in ACTION … Unheralded Veterinary Medical Research Doctor Contributes to Clinical Human and Animal Medical Health - Wednesday, May 11, 2011

One Health in ACTION …

 

Unheralded Veterinary Medical Research Doctor Contributes to Clinical Human and Animal Medical Health

 

Another prime example of interdisciplinary professionals collaborating and influencing the course of medical (health) research discoveries has been the important work by veterinarian George E. Lees, DVM, MS, currently with the Small Animal Clinical Sciences department of Texas A & M’s college of veterinary medicine in College Station, Texas (USA).

Dr. Lees has collaborated with a large number of individuals (at several centers) who are not veterinarians - most are physicians and some are PhD scientists (mostly geneticists).  These include doctors affiliated with the University of Minnesota School of Medicine (in Minneapolis) such as Clifford E. Kashtan, MD.  Others, whose names appear as co-authors on various scientific publications are Alfred F. Michael, MD, Young Ae Kim, PhD, Michelle Rheault, MD and Yoav Segal, MD, PhD.  Among other scientists affiliated with Boys Town National Research Hospital in Omaha, Dr. Lees has worked with Dominic Cosgrove, PhD and Velidi H. Rao, PhD.  In addition, other collaborators have been a canine geneticist Dr. Keith E. Murphy, now Professor and Chair of Genetics and Biochemistry at Clemson University of South Carolina (USA), and physicians affiliated with Arhus University in Denmark, such as Dr. Eric Christensen.

A diplomate in the prestigious American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM), Dr. Lees’ outstanding contributions to “One Medicine” (now commonly referred to as One Health) were discussed in an excellent feature called a “Hero in Medicine” Our Hero in Medicine: George Lees, DVM, MS, DACVIM (Small Animal Internal Medicine). 

“… On the outside, humans and canines may seem like complete opposites, but science is proving the two are more alike than different. Certain genetic disorders, such as Alport syndrome in people and hereditary nephropathy in dogs, are caused by similar genetic mutations. 

Because of these similarities, studies into treatments for the disorders--including work conducted by George Lees, DVM, MS, DACVIM (Small Animal Internal Medicine)--benefit both species. ...”

"Hereditary nephropathy and Alport syndrome are due to defects in the genes that guide the synthesis of type IV collagen," Dr. Lees said. "In dogs, this in turn leads to progressive deterioration of kidney function and the development of chronic renal failure during adolescence."  People with Alport syndrome often suffer from kidney damage, hearing loss, and sight deterioration. …

Please read the entire article on the specific link http://www.acvim.org/websites/acvim/index.php?p=560. Permission to reprint this article on the One Health Initiative website was graciously granted on April 19, 2011 by:

Jenn Armbruster

Communications & Media Relations Manager

American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM)

1997 Wadsworth Blvd. | Lakewood, CO  80214 -5293

303-231-9933 | 800-245-9081 (US or Canada) | 303-231-0880 (Fax)

Jennifer@ACVIM.org  | www.ACVIM.org  | www.ACVIMForum.org


“One Health” Session Scheduled for the North American Veterinary Conference (NAVC), in Orlando, Florida (USA) Monday, January 17, 2011 - Tuesday, December 07, 2010

A fourth good reason to attend the …

“One Health” Session Scheduled for the North American Veterinary Conference (NAVC), in Orlando, Florida (USA) Monday, January 17,  2011 www.navc.com

By scrolling down, you can read about the first three good reasons to attend.  These were described and prepared by Dr. Kate Hodgson (posted November, 29, 2010); Dr. Kirsten Gilardi (posted August 26, 2010); and Dr. Paul P. Calle (posted August 13, 2011).  You may see the entire NAVC One Health program scheduled by scrolling down to the posted News item of Saturday, July 10, 2010.

A fourth outstanding featured speaker attraction: Dr. Donald F. Smith is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) and a prominent, highly acclaimed former Dean at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine (1997-2007).  Dr. Smith graduated from the Ontario Veterinary College (Canada) in 1974, then trained at the University of Pennsylvania as a large animal surgeon.  Apart from a four-year period at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, he has spent the remainder of his career at Cornell University (USA) as a surgeon and professor.  While serving as the ninth dean, Cornell reclaimed the number one designation by U.S. News and World Report, a distinction that it currently holds. As student and teacher of veterinary medical history and public policy, Dr. Smith has lectured extensively on the future challenges and opportunities for the veterinary medical profession. He also currently serves as chair of Cornell’s Admission Committee.

 

 

Abstract: Our Veterinary Legacy: One Health

 

By Donald F. Smith, DVM, DACVS

Professor of Surgery and Austin O. Hooey Dean, Emeritus

Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y. 14853 (USA)

 

“Comparative medicine was an integral part of the fabric of human and animal health in the late 19th century. Several of the world’s leading physicians and veterinarians were colleagues and personal friends as they led their respective medical and veterinary colleges and research centers. Some veterinary deans held both MD and DVM degrees (or their equivalent).

 

Two overarching events—the loss of the horse to the internal combustion engine, and the growth of the land grant colleges for sustaining veterinary education—led to the closure of most of the urban-based veterinary colleges. In addition, the veterinary educational and practice culture moved from comparative medicine to the health and well-being of agricultural species. Public health issues remained important, but not as high a priority as they had been in the formative years of the profession.

 

By the 1930s, veterinary medicine had drifted apart from human medicine and agricultural- and animal-related public health became largely the provenance of veterinarians. Funding for veterinary colleges was the responsibility of agriculture, not health.

 

With the resurgence of interest in zoonotic diseases associated with such events as the outbreak of West Nile virus, Avian flu, melamine food contamination, and the increased use of raw milk, awareness of comparative medicine (though now more commonly designated as one medicine or one health) began to develop in recent years. If there ever was a déjà vu in veterinary medicine, this was it, though perhaps this one is not an allusion!”

 

This presentation provides an overview of the “Back to the Future” story of comparative medicine, and challenges us to consider two additional and far-reaching priorities that represent the foundation of future directions in one health. Practicing veterinarians will find several important and useful take-home messages from this and subsequent presentations throughout the day-long symposium.”

 

Note:  A special evening session is planned for Monday January 17th, 2011 from 6:00 -7:30 P.M. where conference attendees can meet and hear brief One Health presentations by prominent One Health advocates/supporters: veterinarians Lisa A. Conti, DVM, MPH (Director of the Florida Department of Health’s Environmental Health Division); Carina Blackmore, DVM, PhD (Florida State Public Health Veterinarian); and physician, Kevin M. Sherin, MD, MPH - Director, Orange County (Florida) Health Department (USA).  Drs. Conti, Blackmore and Sherin were recently named to the One Health Initiative website teams’ Advisory Board (Hon.) http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/advBoard.php.

Addendum:  The One Health Initiative website team has just been informed that the President of the American Medical Association, Cecil B. Wilson, MD also expects to be present at the special evening session.  Dr. Wilson recently reaffirmed his strong support of One Health with the following August 30, 2010 statement:

"The AMA strongly supports the One Health Initiative, the collaborative effort of multiple disciplines to attain optimal health for humans, animals, and our environment. More than 60 percent of human infectious diseases and the preponderance of emerging infectious diseases have an animal vector. Better collaboration is needed between human and veterinary medicine to protect the public health. The One Health Initiative is playing an important role in achieving this goal."

 

 


Outstanding USA Motivational Educator and One Medicine (One Health) Advocate Dies - Friday, November 26, 2010

Outstanding USA Motivational Educator and One Medicine (One Health) Advocate Dies

*By Dennis Thompson, DVM, MPVM,  Ronald D. Warner, DVM, MPVM, PhD, James L. Alexander, DVM, MPVM, Thomas L. Cropper, DVM, MPVM, James H. Wright, DVM, MPVM

Margaret E. Meyer, PhD (1923-2010), died on October 8th, 2010, after a long, distinguished career as a microbiologist and professor.  She was a professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, at the University of California in Davis (UCD). 

Dr. Meyer’s PhD in Comparative Pathology (UCD) led to a career as a world-renowned expert on brucellosis.  She worked on projects with reindeer in Alaska, bison in Yellowstone, and many other species in Jordan, Siberia, Spain and Jerusalem.   Her career started after receiving a Bachelors Degree in Public Health from the University of California at Berkeley.  She then worked for the U. S. Public Health Service, and later for the County of Alameda (California, USA) on control of tuberculosis.  After working a year with the United States Department of Agriculture, she began her long career at UCD.  She was recipient of a Research Career Development Award from the U.S. Center for Disease Control (now: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or CDC).  Her laboratory was designated as a reference lab for the U.S. Public Health Service and as an official Brucella Training Center for the World Health Organization (WHO).  She was an editorial reviewer for the Journal of Infectious Diseases and a Resident Consultant on brucellosis research at the Pan American Zoonoses Center in Argentina for WHO.  Dr. Meyer was elected as an Honorary Affiliate of the American College of Veterinary Microbiologists and an elected Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology.  She was also formally recognized in many other ways as an eminent scientist, including being designated as Professor Emeritus. 

Perhaps her greatest contribution was the effect she had on hundreds of her students.  Dr. Meyer emphasized zoonoses and espoused “One Medicine” (now commonly referred to as One Health) and well before it regained wide-spread recognition in the first decade of the 21st Century.  It was without doubt, and is still clear, that Dr. Margaret E. Meyer (although neither a veterinarian or physician) was a devoted believer in the “One Medicine” concept, and her lifetime body of work advanced and validated the same.

Dr. Meyer combined detailed knowledge and application of laboratory research, with a broad perspective on disease in populations.  Her teaching skills were so excellent that she changed how students think.  She altered how students would view the world for the rest of their lives.  What higher compliment can there be for a professor than her former students agreeing on that?  Although she was a very serious scientist who was subjected to discrimination, as she broke through barriers that existed for female scientists.  She regularly had a twinkle in her eye when meeting with students, and frequently a soft smile too.  She was a rare scientist who excelled in the laboratory, in the field, and in the classroom.  She was a teacher whose students will remember and appreciate her as long as they live.

*Drs. Thompson, Warner, Alexander, Cropper and Wright were all students of Dr. Meyer.

Obituaries previously posted for Margaret E. Meyer on ProMED-mail 4 Nov-2010 http://www.promedmail.org/pls/apex/f?p=2400:1001:8471666561342788::NO::F2400_P1001_BACK_PAGE,F2400_P1001_PUB_MAIL_ID:1010,85645 and The Sacramento Bee 24 October-2010 http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/sacbee/obituary.aspx?page=lifestory&pid=146162360.


 
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