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‘One Health in Action’...2017 American Academy of Dermatology (physicians, veterinarians and other health scientists) – New York, N.Y. - Saturday, August 05, 2017

‘One Health in Action’...2017 American Academy of Dermatology (physicians, veterinarians and other health scientists) – New York, N.Y.

“Future research collaborations between veterinarians and physician scientists to improve the treatment for chronic itch and atopic dermatitis will result in a better understanding of pathophysiology and treatment responses for humans and canines alike. This is truly the spirit of One Health.”

Jennifer M. Gardner, MD

Assistant Professor, Division of Dermatology

University of Washington

Collaborating Member, UW Center for One Health Research (COHR) http://deohs.washington.edu/cohr/

Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Melanoma and Skin Oncology

https://www.seattlecca.org/physicians/jennifer-m-gardner

Provided by Dr. Gardner to the One Health Initiative website August 4, 2017.

 cid:image001.jpg@01D30D04.44D55BE0

Left to right:  Jennifer Gardner, MD; Daniel Morris, DVM, MPH; Elizabeth Grice, PhD; Kathryn Rook, VMD; Charles Bradley, VMD; Brian Kim, MD.  Not pictured: Dirk Elston, MD.

  

At the 2017 American Academy of Dermatology Summer meeting held in New York City, the new forum entitled “Comparative Dermatology: cases at the intersection of human and veterinary [medical] dermatology and the One Health Paradigm” featured physician dermatologists, veterinarian dermatologists and dermatopathologists and scientists at the podium and asked how can a collaborative approach across these disciplines help us understand our own skin health better? The forum was conceived through collaboration between Dr. Jennifer Gardner, Assistant Professor of Dermatology at the University of Washington in Seattle and Collaborating Member of the UW Center for One Health Research and Dr. Dan Morris, Professor of Dermatology & Allergy at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Gardner provided a short introduction defining “One Health” for the audience and described how using the One Health paradigm can reveal connections between human health, animals and the shared environment. Then three pairs of experts explored topics as they related to OH and dermatology.

First up, Dr. Dirk Elston, Chairman of Dermatology at the Medical University of South Carolina, shared an update regarding Demodex, a.k.a. “the follicle mite, in humans, including skin disorders associated with overgrowth of this usually symbiotic ectoparasite. He also discussed treatment of these problems when our mites are behaving badly. His favorite therapy turns out to be an oldie but still goodie: sulfur.

Dr. Kathryn Rook, a veterinary [medical] dermatologist at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, shared news about a revolution in veterinary [medical] clinics regarding treatment of Demodex mites in dogs and cats, which are not zoonotic, meaning demodectic mange doesn’t get passed from family pets to their humans. Considering the veterinary [medical] world is decades ahead of human medicine with regard to anti-ectoparasitic strategies, it’s worth looking to veterinarians to see what might be coming down the pipeline for humans. A new class of drugs currently licensed in the U.S. for flea and tick prevention in dogs and cats, have been practice-changing when used off-label for the treatment of demodicosis in dogs and cats. Isoxazolines are GABA receptor antagonists leading to paralysis and subsequent death of insects. These medications have resulted in quicker resolution of skin symptoms. There has been a rapid rise in the use of these compounds, which means there is a new chemical in the shared environment that could leave a residue, though whether that holds risk for humans or other animals is as of yet, unknown. 

Next up, we explored a powerful but simple tool in One Health: asking the question, “Do dogs get atopic dermatitis?” It turns out, they absolutely do! And, currently, naturally occurring canine atopic dermatitis (AD) is likely the most established large animal model (i.e. non-mouse model) of human disease in dermatology. By identifying these similarities we can ask how looking to “man’s best friend” can tell us a lot about our own skin. Dr. Charles Bradley, a veterinary dermatopathologist at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine and Dr. Elizabeth Grice, a microbiologist in the Department of Dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania, shared results from their collaboration characterizing the skin microbiome (genetic analysis of the microbial species, in this case bacterial communities, present on the skin) of dogs with AD. What they found mirrored the findings in human pediatric AD, previously characterized by Dr. Heidi Kong’s group at the NIH. By researching the skin microbiome of dogs, we may learn more about ways we can better predict disease progression and novel treatment strategies that could easily translate to healthier skin for humans. This opens the doors for translational research opportunities that go beyond “the mouse trap.” By using large animal models, like dogs, who naturally suffer from similar conditions as humans and who share the same household environment, it’s likely we can derive an even better understanding of how a given treatment strategy would perform for our own skin problems. This approach has the power to improve the heath of both species: a “win-win.”

Last up at the podium, a [physician] dermatologist and scientist, Dr. Brian Kim, the Co-Director for the Center for the Study of Itch at Washington University in St. Louis gave us a preview of his lab’s recent breakthroughs, accepted for publication in the journal Cell. His lab has identified that classical molecules ascribed to the immune system, IL-4 receptor alpha and JAK1, are also functional in the nervous system and critically mediate itch. Human patients that are on drugs to block these molecules enjoy a dramatic improvement in their symptom of itch. He anticipates by designing drugs that are more selective against these neuronal pathways, the paradigm will change when it comes to treating humans with chronic itch.

Dr. Kim’s talk was the perfect segue for Dr. Morris to discuss the veterinary [medical] experience using such targeted systemic therapies for the treatment of pruritus and atopic dermatitis in canines. Having patients covered in fur limits the use of topical therapies, first line approaches for treating atopic dermatitis in humans. Thus, veterinarians are 5-6 years ahead of human dermatology in using these treatment strategies. Dr. Morris discussed the JAK-1 inhibitor, oclacitinib, in treating his patients with these conditions. He then told the audience about lokivetmab, a caninized monoclonal antibody against IL-31, a mediator of itch through neuronal pathways. He provided examples of success in dogs who failed therapy with oclacitinib and discussed some limitations of IL-31 inhibitors, namely that they are good at decreasing the symptom of pruritus but do not have a good anti-inflammatory effect and may not be the answer for dogs who suffer from recurrent pyoderma. Future research collaborations between veterinarians and physician scientists to improve the treatment for chronic itch and atopic dermatitis will result in a better understanding of pathophysiology and treatment responses for humans and canines alike. This is truly the spirit of One Health.

References:

Beugnet F, Halos L, et al. Efficacy of oral afoxolaner for the treatment of canine generalized demodicosis. Parasite (2016) 23:14.

Bradley CW, Morris DO, Rankin SC, Cain CL, Misic AM, Houser T, et al. Longitudinal Evaluation of the Skin Microbiome and Association with Microenvironment and Treatment in Canine Atopic Dermatitis. J Invest Dermatol. 2016;136(6):1182-90.

Cosgrove SB, Cleaver DM, King VL, et al. Long-term compassionate use of oclacitinib in dogs with atopic and allergic skin disease: safety, efficacy and quality of life. Vet Dermatol 2015; 26: 171–e35.

Fourie JJ, Liebenberg JE, et al. Efficacy of orally administered fluralaner (Bravecto™) or topically applied imidacloprid/moxidectin (Advocate®) against generalized demodicosis in dogs. Parasites & Vectors. (2015) 8:187.

Gadeyne C, Little P, King VL, et al. Efficacy of oclacitinib (Apoquel) compared with prednisolone for the control of pruritus and clinical signs associated with allergic dermatitis in client-owned dogs in Australia. Vet Dermatol 2014; 25: 512–e86.

Gassel M, Wolf C, et al. The novel isoxazoline ectoparasiticide fluralaner: Selective inhibition of arthropod 𝛾-aminobutyric acid- and 𝐿-glutamate-gated chloride channels and insecticidal/acaricidal activity. Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2014) 45:111.

Gonzales AJ, Humphrey WR, Messamore JE, et al. Interleukin-31: its role in canine pruritus and naturally occurring canine atopic dermatitis. Vet Dermatol 2013;24:48-e12.

Kong HH, Oh J, Deming C, Conlan S, Grice EA, Beatson MA, et al. Temporal shifts in the skin microbiome associated with disease flares and treatment in children with atopic dermatitis. Genome Res. 2012;22(5):850-9.

Little PR, King VL, Davis KR, et al. A blinded, randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy and safety of oclacitinib and cyclosporine for the control of atopic dermatitis in client-owned dogs.  Vet Dermatol 2015; 26: 23–e8.

Michels GM, Ramsey DS, Walsh KF, et al. A blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose determination trial of lokivetmab (ZTS-00103289), a caninized, anti-canine IL-31 monoclonal antibody in client owned dogs with atopic dermatitis. Vet Dermatol 2016; 27: 478–e129.

Mizuno T, Kanbayashi S, Okawa T, et al. Molecular cloning of canine interleukin-31 and its expression in various tissues. Vet Immunol Immunopathol 2009;131:140-3.

Weber T, Selzer PM. Isoxazolines: A novel chemotype highly effective on ectoparasites. Chem Med Chem 2016;11:270-6.


One Health: Vet Med Researcher Lands Grant To Study Pediatric Cancer - Saturday, July 29, 2017

 

Texas A&M TodayTexas A&M Today LogoTexas A&M Today

 

Saturday, July 29, 2017

One Health: Vet Med Researcher Lands Grant To Study Pediatric Cancer

July 27, 2017

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Dr. Heather Wilson-Robles

Dr. Heather Wilson-Robles [a veterinarian]

 

By Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences Staff

 

Dr. Heather Wilson-Robles [DVM, DACVIM (oncology)] http://vetmed.tamu.edu/directorydetail?UserID=898, an associate professor and the Dr. Fred A. and Vola N. Palmer Chair in Comparative Oncology in the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences’ (CVM) Small Animal Clinical Sciences Department, has been awarded a $94,255 research grant from the St. Baldrick’s Foundation.

“Dr. Wilson-Robles is a quintessential clinician-scholar whose independent and collaborative discoveries are carving the path to a better understanding of cancer and, ultimately, to effective cancer treatments in canine patients that will eventually translate to human patients,” said Dr. Eleanor M. Green, the Carl B. King Dean of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University.

Wilson-Robles’ grant is one of 90 given to professors from across the country by St. Baldrick’s Foundation. The foundation is providing $23.5 million in its summer grant cycle to support the brightest minds in the pediatric cancer field. ...

Please read complete article at https://today.tamu.edu/2017/07/27/one-health-vet-med-researcher-lands-grant-to-study-pediatric-cancer/ or https://goo.gl/Bo5HmG.

_______________________________

Editor’s note: This is a significant example (among many others) demonstrating the critical need for more rapidly recognizing and implementing the One Health approach for comparative medicine/translational medicine research.  On May 10, 2012, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a statement to the One Health Initiative team/website endorsing One Health http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/news.php?query=American+Academy+of+Pediatrics+Endorses+One+Health+ or https://goo.gl/pKcE7a.

“ONE HEALTH”, a significant international public health/comparative medicine paradigm shift! Why? How? - Wednesday, May 13, 2015

“ONE HEALTH”, a significant international public health/comparative medicine paradigm shift!  Why? How?

 

“The One Health Initiative is a movement to forge co-equal, all inclusive collaborations between physicians, osteopaths, veterinarians, dentists, nurses and other scientific-health and environmentally related disciplines, including the American Medical Association, American Veterinary Medical Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, American Nurses Association, American Association of Public Health Physicians, the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the U.S. National Environmental Health Association (NEHA) and many others worldwide http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php”. 

The One Health concept was embraced in an historic comprehensive American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) task force report http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/taskForce.php which essentially remains a valid, contemporary roadmap for establishing and implementing the One Health approach nationally and internationally.  Incorporated therein was the establishment of an implementing One Health Commission www.onehealthcommission.org.

To demonstrate the momentum of the One Health movement to date, note that the World Veterinary Association and the World Medical Association will be holding a first ever landmark One Health collaborative conference in Madrid, Spain May 21-22, 2015 http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/news.php?query=Reminder+Notice%3A+Historic+milestone+physician%2Fveterinarian+global+One+Health+conference%85

 

FINAL WVA/WMA Conference agenda - May 13, 2015 http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/FINAL%20PROGRAM.pdf

 

Out of a multitude of One Health achievement examples during the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, see the extraordinary tip of the iceberg below:

 

These include public health and comparative medicine issues such as Heart Disease, Cancer, Orthopedic Disease, Anesthesiology, Obesity, Parasitic Diseases, Tuberculosis, Global Infectious Disease, Influenza,  Human Hepatitis C virus, Tickborne Diseases, Food Safety, Hendra virus vaccine, Aspergillus felis, Immunizations (vaccinations), Lou Gehrig’s Disease,  Ebola, Antibiotic Use and Resistance, Staphylococcus resistant infections, Environmental health Policymaking, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever viruses, Renderpest, Emergency/Disaster preparedness and many others.

SEE: http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/ONE%20HEALTH%20a%20significant%20international%20public%20health%20comparative%20medicine%20OHI%20POSTING%20May%2013%202015.pdf


Colorado State University (USA) Director of Center for Comparative and Integrative Medicine Issues Strong One Health Endorsement - Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Colorado State University (USA) Director of Center for Comparative and Integrative Medicine Issues Strong One Health Endorsement

“I am delighted that the One Health Initiative is leading the charge of fostering collaboration and communication among all branches of health care.  The time has come to make this happen.  We need to bridge the gap between humans and animals as well as us and the planet as a matter of not only establishing best medical practices but also ensuring our collective survival.

Every day is “One Health” for me, extending from my human osteopathic medical practice to the Integrative Medicine Service at the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital.  In my role as Director of the CSU Center for Comparative and Integrative Pain Medicine, I teach, research, and write about scientific, integrative medicine from a One Health perspective.  I educate students, practitioners, and the public about ways in which medical acupuncture, botanical medicine, manual therapy, and more apply and translate across the species spectrum (including humans) while at the same time leave a gentler footprint on the planet.”

Provided to the One Health Initiative website November 23, 2014 by:

Narda G. Robinson, DO, DVM, MS, FAAMA

Director, CSU Center for Comparative and Integrative Medicine

Medical Director and Educational Architect, OneHealth SIM

Colorado State University

Veterinary Teaching Hospital

300 West Drake Road

Fort Collins, CO  80523

970-297-4202 (phone)

970-297-1275 (fax)

Narda.Robinson@colostate.edu (email)

Editor’s note:  Dr. Robinson’s educational background and career http://www.onehealthsim.org/narda-g-robinson-do-dvm-ms-faama/ & http://www.csuvth.colostate.edu/DirectorySearch/Search/MemberProfile/vth/1046 includes a unique combination of human osteopathic medicine (Doctor of Osteopathy degree) http://www.aacom.org/become-a-doctor/about-om#aboutom plus that of being a veterinarian, i.e. trained in veterinary medicine (Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veterinary_physician.  Obviously this provides an ideal One Medicine/One Health perspective and appreciation for utilizing a multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary teaching approach to students at the college of veterinary medicine at Colorado State University (USA) http://csu-cvmbs.colostate.edu/Pages/default.aspx.  As a longstanding One Health Supporter/Advocate, Dr. Robinson is also listed on the One Health Initiative website’s Supporters page http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php.

“The One Health Initiative http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/ is a movement to forge co-equal, all inclusive collaborations between physicians, osteopaths, veterinarians, dentists, nurses and other scientific-health and environmentally related disciplines, including the American Medical Association, American Veterinary Medical Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, American Nurses Association, American Association of Public Health Physicians, the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the U.S. National Environmental Health Association (NEHA).   The One Health concept has gained substantial international recognition during the first two decades of the 21st century, e.g. it is now endorsed by the World Health Health Organization (WHO), Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO), and World Organization of Animal Health (OIE).


Advance One Health or... Impede One Health? – An opinion - Friday, January 04, 2013

Advance One Health or... Impede One Health? – An opinion

 

 

By One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono Team: Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP ▪ Bruce Kaplan, DVM ▪ Thomas P. Monath, MD ▪ Jack Woodall, PhD Lisa A. Conti, DVM, MPH

       Posted One Health Initiative website NEWS page January 4, 2013

 

 

“Let us go forward together...”

 

              Winston Churchill

 

 

One Health interest and implementation actitivities have literally “taken off” during the last two years in the U.S. and worldwide.  This is evidenced by the numerous national and international meetings, symposia, “official” governmental agencies and unofficial organizations, university institutions and grass roots individuals as well as “VIPs” raising the banner for more One Health performance and execution. 

 

Examples include:

 

·         A host of recent VIPs and prominent organizational endorsements have encouraged and helped by articulating One Health positions and endorsements, e.g. American Academy of Pediatrics, American Association of Public Health Physicians, American Nurses Association, United States Animal Health Association, and the U.S. National League of Cities. http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php and http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/endorsements.php

·         Emerging One Health organizations, symposia and publications have an all-inclusive policy, e.g. the U.S. One Health Commission www.onehealthcommission.org, the 1st International One Health Congress meeting in Australia,  http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/One%20Health%20Society%20Proposal%20Amended%20version.pdf, Veterinaria Italiana Journal http://www.izs.it/vet_italiana/index.htm, and Infection, Ecology and Epidemiology One Health Journal (Sweden) http://www.infee.se/infeecommunity/node/14.  The One Health Initiative team/website www.onehealthinitiative.com has always been all inclusive and offered free participation.

·         Since the landmark American Veterinary Medical Association’s (AVMA) One Health taskforce report http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/taskForce.php a host of legitimate and useful publications, white papers and blogs have appeared with repetitive dissertations from different worldwide perspectives as to how to proceed. 

 

Essentially, these accumulative views all express goals for the classic management principles for planning, organizing and executing One Health into the scheme of providing more efficacious public health and clinical health care for society with the reasonable incorporation of One Health principles.

 

However, from our viewpoint, it now appears (January 2013) that the One Health movement is precariously trending towards many factions or “silos” vying for shortsighted supremacy and/or One Health ownership, absent the true spirit of One Health (formerly called “One Medicine”), i.e. the collaborative, interdisciplinary/multidisciplinary principle of sharing and outreach beyond organizational, institutional, national and international boundaries...previously admonished in http://www.izs.it/vet_italiana/2009/45_3/377.pdf:

 

“...no single person, no single health profession, no single organization, and no single nation or people invented or owns One Health. It is an all-inclusive, co-equal endeavor that belongs to all of humanity.  A caveat: while honest debate over efficacious process should be welcome, factionalism should not.”

 

Hopefully all groups will begin to recognize that long-term, it will be much more efficacious for all to work together and share the benefits equally in the true spirit of One Health.  Everyone working on the same page is a tall order.  This will require altruistic individual, national and international leadership emergence—with emphasis on “leadership”... otherwise, in the words of one One Health VIP, “the life protecting-life saving One Health movement will likely wither on the vine”.  Cui bono?

 

 

Note: The One Health Initiative team/website welcomes and encourages thoughtful opinions and views being submitted for posting.  Please send copy with under 500 words and no more than five (5) references included to kkm@onehealthinitiative.com.  Also, identify your affiliation(s) and background with an updated CV.  Articles will be edited and returned to qualified author(s) for final approval prior to posting unless accepted verbatim as submitted.


American Academy of Pediatrics’ Official News Magazine Encourages One Health Support - Thursday, June 28, 2012

American Academy of Pediatrics’ Official News Magazine Encourages One Health Support

 

“To promote better awareness of zoonotic infections, identify animal-related allergies, understand the health benefits of human-animal relationships and recognize animals as sentinels in environmental risk exposures, the Academy is supporting a collaborative effort of human and veterinary medical organizations called the One Health Initiative.

Pediatricians are asked to consider animal-related issues in daily practice by taking a history of animal contact and consulting and collaborating with local veterinarians. For details, visit www.onehealthinitiative.com.”

 

Please see statement: http://aapnews.aappublications.org/content/33/7/20.2.full

 

Permission to post this statement and link to the official News Magazine of the American Academy of Pediatrics on the One Health Initiative website was graciously provided by:

 

Jennifer Frantz, MPH

Manager, Committee on Infectious Diseases
Division of Technical and Medical Services
American Academy of Pediatrics
141 Northwest Point Blvd.
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007-1098
Tel: 847-434-7939
Fax: 847-434-8000
jfrantz@aap.org

 

The AAP previously endorsed One Health with a statement from their President Robert W. Block, MD, FAAP.  This was posted May 11, 2012 on the One Health Initiative website.  See below:

 

American Academy of Pediatrics Endorses One Health

 

Statement issued to One Health Initiative team/website www.onehealthinitiative.com May 10, 2012

 

 

"The American Academy of Pediatrics is a not-for-profit medical association of more than 60,000 member pediatricians in the United States and throughout the world.  For more than 80 years, the Academy has devoted its energies and resources to the attainment of optimal health and well-being for all infants, children, adolescents, and young adults.

 

The Academy supports pediatricians, veterinarians, and other health care professionals in their efforts to prevent zoonotic disease transmission. It publishes pediatric guidance on minimizing the risk of exposure to animals in the home and to animals in public settings, and its policy is used in pediatric medical research and education worldwide.

 

The Academy has embraced the concept of the One Health initiative since 2008, supporting its aims to enhance interdisciplinary collaboration between human health, veterinary medical, and environmental professionals."

 

Robert W. Block, MD, FAAP

President

American Academy of Pediatrics

                                                     One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono Team:

                                                                                         Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP ▪ Bruce Kaplan, DVM ▪

                                                                                         Thomas P. Monath, MD ▪ Jack Woodall, PhD ▪

                                                                                         Lisa A. Conti, DVM, MPH

 

Important Note: The One Health Initiative team with assistance from prominent Yale medical school physician, Peter M. Rabinowitz, MD, MPH, recently produced a One Pager “Practicing “One Health” for the Human Health Clinician (Physicians, Osteopaths, Physician Associates, Nurse Practitioners, Other Human Health Care Providers)” in English and Spanish language (translation) versions:

See: http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/Practicing%20One%20Health%20Human%20Health%20Care%20Providers%20April%202012.pdf  and http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/Practicando%20Una%20Salud%20para%20el%20Medico%20de%20la%20Salud%20Humana.pdf


American Academy of Pediatrics Endorses One Health - Friday, May 11, 2012

American Academy of Pediatrics Endorses One Health

 

Statement issued to One Health Initiative team/website www.onehealthinitiative.com May 10, 2012

 

 

"The American Academy of Pediatrics is a not-for-profit medical association of more than 60,000 member pediatricians in the United States and throughout the world.  For more than 80 years, the Academy has devoted its energies and resources to the attainment of optimal health and well-being for all infants, children, adolescents, and young adults.

 

The Academy supports pediatricians, veterinarians, and other health care professionals in their efforts to prevent zoonotic disease transmission. It publishes pediatric guidance on minimizing the risk of exposure to animals in the home and to animals in public settings, and its policy is used in pediatric medical research and education worldwide.

 

The Academy has embraced the concept of the One Health initiative since 2008, supporting its aims to enhance interdisciplinary collaboration between human health, veterinary medical, and environmental professionals."

 

Robert W. Block, MD, FAAP

President

American Academy of Pediatrics

                                                     One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono Team:

                                                                                         Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP ▪ Bruce Kaplan, DVM ▪

                                                                                         Thomas P. Monath, MD ▪ Jack Woodall, PhD ▪

                                                                                         Lisa A. Conti, DVM, MPH


Outstanding USA Motivational Educator and One Medicine (One Health) Advocate Dies - Friday, November 26, 2010

Outstanding USA Motivational Educator and One Medicine (One Health) Advocate Dies

*By Dennis Thompson, DVM, MPVM,  Ronald D. Warner, DVM, MPVM, PhD, James L. Alexander, DVM, MPVM, Thomas L. Cropper, DVM, MPVM, James H. Wright, DVM, MPVM

Margaret E. Meyer, PhD (1923-2010), died on October 8th, 2010, after a long, distinguished career as a microbiologist and professor.  She was a professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, at the University of California in Davis (UCD). 

Dr. Meyer’s PhD in Comparative Pathology (UCD) led to a career as a world-renowned expert on brucellosis.  She worked on projects with reindeer in Alaska, bison in Yellowstone, and many other species in Jordan, Siberia, Spain and Jerusalem.   Her career started after receiving a Bachelors Degree in Public Health from the University of California at Berkeley.  She then worked for the U. S. Public Health Service, and later for the County of Alameda (California, USA) on control of tuberculosis.  After working a year with the United States Department of Agriculture, she began her long career at UCD.  She was recipient of a Research Career Development Award from the U.S. Center for Disease Control (now: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or CDC).  Her laboratory was designated as a reference lab for the U.S. Public Health Service and as an official Brucella Training Center for the World Health Organization (WHO).  She was an editorial reviewer for the Journal of Infectious Diseases and a Resident Consultant on brucellosis research at the Pan American Zoonoses Center in Argentina for WHO.  Dr. Meyer was elected as an Honorary Affiliate of the American College of Veterinary Microbiologists and an elected Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology.  She was also formally recognized in many other ways as an eminent scientist, including being designated as Professor Emeritus. 

Perhaps her greatest contribution was the effect she had on hundreds of her students.  Dr. Meyer emphasized zoonoses and espoused “One Medicine” (now commonly referred to as One Health) and well before it regained wide-spread recognition in the first decade of the 21st Century.  It was without doubt, and is still clear, that Dr. Margaret E. Meyer (although neither a veterinarian or physician) was a devoted believer in the “One Medicine” concept, and her lifetime body of work advanced and validated the same.

Dr. Meyer combined detailed knowledge and application of laboratory research, with a broad perspective on disease in populations.  Her teaching skills were so excellent that she changed how students think.  She altered how students would view the world for the rest of their lives.  What higher compliment can there be for a professor than her former students agreeing on that?  Although she was a very serious scientist who was subjected to discrimination, as she broke through barriers that existed for female scientists.  She regularly had a twinkle in her eye when meeting with students, and frequently a soft smile too.  She was a rare scientist who excelled in the laboratory, in the field, and in the classroom.  She was a teacher whose students will remember and appreciate her as long as they live.

*Drs. Thompson, Warner, Alexander, Cropper and Wright were all students of Dr. Meyer.

Obituaries previously posted for Margaret E. Meyer on ProMED-mail 4 Nov-2010 http://www.promedmail.org/pls/apex/f?p=2400:1001:8471666561342788::NO::F2400_P1001_BACK_PAGE,F2400_P1001_PUB_MAIL_ID:1010,85645 and The Sacramento Bee 24 October-2010 http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/sacbee/obituary.aspx?page=lifestory&pid=146162360.


Vermont (USA) Pediatrician Provides Model for Advancing One Health Principles - Saturday, March 13, 2010

Vermont (USA) Pediatrician Provides Model for Advancing One Health Principles

 

On March 8, 2010 an e-mail message to Dean Joan Hendricks, prominent One Health supporter/advocate at the University of Pennsylvania school of veterinary medicine in Philadelpia, Pennsylvania (USA) from John Trumper, MD, a longstanding valued One Health supporter in the state of Vermont modestly advised Dr. Hendricks of his remarkable One Health activities this past year.

 

Dr. Trumper told Dr. Hendricks:

 

“It's been a year since you helped us launch our One Health Initiative up here, and I promised then to give you some follow up.

 

We have been concentrating on communicating at the practitioner level of physicians and [veterinarians].  At the state society level, there was a brief One Health Initiative (OHI) presentation at the State Medical Society meeting last fall. I attended the State Veterinary Society meeting, and we now include a veterinarian presenter at the Academy of Pediatrics spring meeting and [veterinarians] are invited to all our membership meetings.


To help at the local community level, we formed a joint committee that meets every 2 months or so and has developed a power point presentation on OHI that [veterinarians] can use at local hospital presentations to physicians. There have been just two talks by [veterinarians] at local hospitals so far, with two more scheduled in April.  Subjects have included: "Animal Bites from the Perpetrators Point of View", "People, Pets, & Parasites," and The Raw Milk Sale Debate. We have a request for a speaker on The Ididerad, and on pet obesity and childhood obesity; a connection?


The local veterinarians are invited to all these local hospital presentations and so far attendance by both groups has been gratifying. So, we have a long way to go, but our modest plans of starting at the local level, thanks to your help, are underway.”

Note: The One Health team of Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP, Bruce Kaplan, DVM, Thomas P. Monath, MD and Jack Woodall, PhD strongly endorses Dr. Trumper’s model activities and hope that other visionary physicians nationally and internationally will consider following suit.

 

The following News items were initially published on this One Health Initiative website in June and July of 2009:

 

 

Vermont (USA) Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics Resolution Endorses One Health - Saturday, July 18, 2009

Vermont (USA) Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics Resolution Endorses One Health

 

July 2, 2009 – Provided to One Health Initiative website by:

                                        John Trumper, MD

                                        P.O. Box 7, Brattleboro

                                        Vermont 05302

 Passed July 1, 2009 - RESOLVED:     That the Vermont Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics continue its programs, already begun, of furthering communication with Veterinarians by endorsing the efforts of the One Health Initiative, which operates globally and nationally, and by working locally with Veterinarians to share presentations of interest to both professions at meetings, websites, and by encouraging individual contact.


 

Vermont (USA) Pediatrician Describes Activist One Health Collaborative Educational Efforts - June 26, 2009 - Friday, July 17, 2009

Vermont (USA) Pediatrician Describes Activist One Health Collaborative Educational Efforts

 

June 26, 2009

 

John Trumper, MD, a retired Vermont pediatrician, updated the One Health Initiative website regarding physician efforts to expand and utilize One Health principles by educating fellow practicing physicians and veterinarians statewide.  This hopefully represents a significant and efficacious blueprint [in brief] to help guide others in the U.S. and abroad.

 

“The joint meeting and visit (please see News item to follow) from Joan Hendricks, VMD, PhD (Dean of the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine) was simply an inauguration of our Vermont efforts to alert practicing physicians in the state to the One Health concept, of which the Veterinarians are already well aware. We have begun with the pediatricians, as we believe that our specialty has the most in common with veterinarians
     Taking seriously your statements about the priority for the development of the OHI concept among practicing primary care physicians and veterinarians, we have a committee from both disciplines working on presentations by veterinarians at community hospital medical staff meetings and Continuing Medical Education sessions. This seems to be the most effective way to reach the silent majority of busy practitioners who don't attend state and national meetings. Our goal is to have local veterinarians do these talks to encourage future relationships between our disciplines at the community level. Our thinking is that offering an outline and/or power-point to the presenter would encourage more DVMs and/or VMDs to do it.
     I attended the Vermont Veterinary Medical Association meeting last week (the lone physician there).  I found it to be very interesting & informative and hope that we can include subjects of mutual interest in future state meetings of both groups. The annual meeting of the Vermont Medical Society in October will also include a short introduction of the One Health concept by a local veterinarian.
     So these are the steps we've taken and are planning; all aimed at our practitioners.”

John Trumper, MD, P.O. Box 7, Brattleboro, Vermont 05302

Footnote: Dr. Trumper has continued numerous activist participations in worthwhile causes related to health care including the One Health movement.

________________________________________

Vermont Physicians and Veterinarians Talk ‘One Health’ while attending Joint Spring Meeting

 

The Vermont Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Vermont Chapter of the American Academy of Family Physicians invited Vermont Veterinary Medical Association members to attend their joint spring meeting in Rutland, VT on April 30, 2009. 

 

Joan Hendricks, VMD, PhD, Dean of the University of Pennsylvania’s school of veterinary medicine was invited to give the keynote presentation on the One Health Initiative from the veterinary medical perspective. In addition, Dr. Hendricks had been invited to present her description of the One Health concept at Pediatric Grand Rounds to students, residents, and staff at the University of Vermont medical school the day before.  Drs. Hendricks, Charles D. Newton, DVM, MS and Arthur Rubenstein, MBBCh (MD) recently published a comprehensive article in the Veterinaria Italiana One Health monograph entitled ‘One Medicine-One Health’ at the School of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania – the first 125 years http://www.izs.it/vet_italiana/2009/45_1/183.htm.

 

The University of Pennsylvania’s school of veterinary medicine was started 125 years ago by the physician faculty of their medical school. In 1807 Benjamin Rush, MD postulated that "By extending our knowledge of the causes of the diseases of domestic animals, we may add greatly to the certainty and usefulness of the profession of medicine, as far as it relates to the human species".  From 1884 until the 1960's, students at Penn studying human and animal medicine took the basic science courses (e.g., physiology, pathology, microbiology, etc.) together…further evidence that One Health really does have a long and rich history at Penn.

 

Dr Hendricks discussed One Health in the context of how the veterinary and human medical professionals collaborate in biomedical research, food safety, environmental health issues, and emergency medical response for the benefit of both human and animal health.  The Human-Animal Bond phenomenon was mentioned using companion animals (pets) and horses in therapy, learning, and helping "at risk" humans at every level.  The use of household pets as sentinels for domestic abuse and prognostication of that possibility in the future was discussed.

 

A bright future was painted for One Health: developing closer "in the trenches" communication between local physicians/veterinarians/nurses and other health care personnel; increasing numbers of physicians, veterinarians and nurses adding a PhD to their resume;  encouraging state boards to recognize continuing education credits when licensees attend courses advanced by either medical or veterinary medical organizations.

 

Joann M. Lindenmayer, DVM, MPH, an associate professor in the Department of Environmental and Population Health at Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine and a prominent One Health supporter, presented a short synopsis of Tufts innovative programs involving human and animal medicine. Tufts veterinary medical program was founded 30 years ago on "One Health" principles promoted by University President Jean Mayer, a human nutritionist. Early on, Tufts veterinary medical students attended pre-clinical classes side-by-side with Tufts medical students. Dr. Lindenmayer joined Dr. Hendricks for an informative question, answer and comment session.

 

Provided by:

 

J. Clyde Johnson, VMD, Past President,

American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP)

313 N. Shore Rd.

Spofford, NH  03462-3907

 


 
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