One Health News

 
Search News:
 
Found 482 Matching Results. View archived News Here.

One Health Initiative team *Physician member Joins Prominent International veterinary biopharmaceutical company - Thursday, August 21, 2014

One Health in Action…

 

One Health Initiative team *Physician member Joins Prominent International veterinary biopharmaceutical company

ANNOUNCEMENT: Dr. Thomas Monath (Harvard School of Public Health) joins SmartVet Advisory Board and heads up Transdermal Vaccine Project.

 http://www.smartvet.com/news/entry/announcement-dr-thomas-monath-harvard-school-of-public-health-joins-smartvet-advisory-board.html

 

 http://www.smartvet.com/images/PDFs/Bios%20of%20Management%20Team%2011June14%20v1%202.pdf

SmartVet is glad to formally announce that Dr. Thomas Monath, Adjunct Professor Harvard School of Public Health, has now joined the SmartVet team. Dr Monath will oversee SmartVet's Transdermal Vaccine Project and help direct research efforts toward the most efficient way of achieving successful transdermal immunization using a similar variation of the existing VetGun Delivery System.

Dr. Thomas P. Monath [http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/Tom%20Monath%20Biography%20January2014.pdf] is a physician and Adjunct Professor (Emeritus), Harvard School of Public Health. He has substantial bioscience investment experience as an ex-partner in the Pandemic and Biodefense Fund, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers.

Tom’s direct industry experience includes 14 years as Chief Scientific Officer and Executive Director of Acambis (a publicly traded biopharmaceutical company which was acquired by Sanofi-Aventis in 2008). While at Acambis he pioneered and directed Research and Development of ChimeriVax® vaccines against dengue, Japanese encephalitis, West Nile, as well as vaccines against yellow fever, Clostridium difficile and ACAM2000, a smallpox vaccine that has now replaced calf lymph vaccine in the national stockpile for defense against bioterrorism. He served in the uniformed services of the U.S. Army and U.S. Public Health Service for 24 years prior to retiring in 1992 as a Colonel. Between 1973-1988, Tom was Director, Division of Vector-Borne Viral Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado and from 1989-92 was Chief of the Virology Division, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). He has worked in Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Cameroon, Argentina and Ecuador doing field research on arboviruses and hemorrhagic fevers. He is on the editorial board of ten scientific journals and has published approximately 385 papers and edited six books on the epidemiology, immunology and pathogenesis of viruses and on vaccine development. Tom received the Nathanial A. Young Award (1984), the Richard M. Taylor Award (1996), and the Walter Reed Medal (2002) from the American Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene (ASTMH) and was President of American Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene from 2004-2005. He has served on numerous government and international committees on infectious diseases, biosecurity, World Health Organization (WHO) expert committees and the National Vaccines Advisory Committee (USA). Between 1998 and 2000, he was Senior Science Advisor to the Director, Central Intelligence Agency. A leader in the “One Health” movement, Tom served on the American Veterinary Medical Association’s (AVMA) “One Health” Task Force and subsequently the One Health Commission (USA). Tom received his undergraduate degree from Harvard College and an M.D. from Harvard Medical School. He trained in internal medicine at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston, MA.

For more details on the SmartVet Executive Team, and it's Advisory Board, please click here. For further information regarding SmartVet's Transdermal Vaccine Project, please contact Grant Weyer, CEO at gweyer@smartvet.com

 

*Important Note:  Dr. Monath published a visionary, landmark One Health Vaccine Journal article in September 2013 (see below)…and having an eminent physician virologist/vaccinologist working with a veterinary company utilizes the One Health approach for potentially expeditious/advanced discoveries and applications of new technologies for animal and human health.

 

Posted Wednesday, October 09, 2013 on One Health Initiative website NEWS page:

A potential large scale “One Health in Action” ... another dynamic case for implementing One Health!

 

Vaccines against diseases transmitted from animals to humans: A one health paradigm

“This review focuses on the immunization of animals as a means of preventing human diseases (zoonoses). …”

In simple terms, the idea is to develop vaccines that protect domestic animals and wildlife thereby establishing effective barriers against human infections.  Developing animal vaccines are less expensive and are less strictly regulated than are those for humans.  Hopefully a common sense One Health approach can go forward.

http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/Thomas%20P.%20Monath,%20MD%20Sept%202013%20One%20Health%20Vaccine%20Article.pdf 

 


One Health approach acknowledged worldwide—Examples (USA, Europe, Asia, Australia, India): - Sunday, August 17, 2014

One Health approach acknowledged worldwide—Examples (USA, Europe, Asia, Australia, India):

 

SEE http://goo.gl/UURd4N; http://goo.gl/9jIyGT; http://goo.gl/aYKoeR; http://goo.gl/Mu3NUa; http://goo.gl/OGWuFp; http://goo.gl/35wbdB


One Health Initiative WEBSITE Snapshots of EBOLA…August 11, 2014 – NOTABLE “One Health in Action” Highlights - Monday, August 11, 2014

Amat victoria curam

          –Victory favors the prepared-

One Health Initiative WEBSITE Snapshots of EBOLA

 August 11, 2014 – NOTABLE “One Health in Action” Highlights:

 

·         Ebola virus – A One Health History - In 1976, two eminent virologists, Drs. Karl M. Johnson [MD] a physician and Frederick A. Murphy [DVM, PhD] a veterinarian collaborated closely together (along with others) to help unravel the mystery surrounding the initial outbreak of Ebola haemorrhagic fever and discovered its etiologic agent, the Ebola virus.  The most commonly seen and famous electron microscope photograph of the virus per se was originally taken by Dr. Murphy. http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/endorsements.php

 

Currently:

 

·         University of Texas Medical Branch scientist/veterinarian Dr. Thomas Ksiazek [DVM, PhD] is now on the scene in West Africa http://www.utmb.edu/newsroom/article9735.aspx

 

Dr. Ksiazek, director of the high containment laboratory operations for the Galveston National Laboratory at the University of Texas Medical Branch, left for Sierra Leone on Aug. 11 to lead the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Ebola outbreak control operations, assisting the government of Sierra Leone. His role is part of a massive effort being supported by research and medical professionals from the CDC as well as from other institutions from around the world. Ksiazek is director of the National Biodefense Training Center and a world-renowned virologist with 40 years of experience on the front lines of some of the worst infectious disease outbreaks the world has ever seen.

 

  • One Health Initiative team member, Dr. Jack Woodall (PhD research scientist/epidemiologist, co-founder of ProMED-mail and a recent American Veterinary Epidemiology (AVES) honorary diploma recipient) is periodically updating Ebola information on the One Health Initiative website’s ProMED Outbreak Reports page http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/promed.php.

         

The Critical Question We're Not Asking About The Ebola Outbreak - Huffington Post, July 31, 2014 – Posted One Health Initiative website NEWS page http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/news.php Saturday, August 02, 2014

Excellent One Health article on Huffington Post…

The Critical Question We're Not Asking About The Ebola Outbreak

Posted: 07/31/2014 6:39 pm EDT Updated: 07/31/2014 6:59 pm EDT

“The ebola outbreak in West Africa has the world on edge: Will the virus spill into new communities? Will it cross more borders? Even oceans? How can caregivers raise the victims' chances of survival, as well as reduce their own chances of getting sick?

Some experts emphasize the importance of another, generally overlooked question: How can we thwart such deadly outbreaks in the first place? … “

Please read full article http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/31/ebola-outbreak-causes_n_5638503.html?1406846385

 

Link graciously provided by Lynne Peeples lynne.peeples@huffingtonpost.com

 ____________________

 

How to prevent the next Ebola outbreak - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists 07/13/2014 - 20:48 – Posted One Health Initiative website NEWS Sunday, July 20, 2014

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists 07/13/2014 - 20:48

How to prevent the next Ebola outbreak

By Columnist *Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP Laura H. Kahn

“The Ebola virus has emerged in three West African countries where it had not previously been reported: Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. In early July, health ministers from 11 countries and representatives from the World Health Organization (WHO) and relevant partner organizations met in an emergency two-day meeting in Accra, Ghana, to strategize on containing the worsening crisis. So far, the outbreak is the largest and deadliest since the disease was first recognized in 1976 in northern Zaire. As of July 8, there had been 888 cases and 539 deaths, with a mortality rate over 60 percent. Previous outbreaks, in Central African countries, typically had mortality rates closer to 90 percent. …

“…This is why a One Health approach—an approach that recognizes the connection between human health and animal and environmental health—is so important in Africa. Healthy livestock promote healthy humans. Unfortunately, developing countries have difficulty providing food for their human populations, let alone their livestock. Livestock production accounts for relatively little agricultural output in sub-Saharan Africa. Public health and agriculture experts must work together to improve agriculture and figure out how to meet Africans’ demands for animal proteins in an environmentally sustainable way.”

Please read entire column at http://thebulletin.org/how-prevent-next-ebola-outbreak7312 

 

*International One Health physician leader, Dr. Kahn is a Research Scholar, Program on Science and Global Security’ Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University and Co-Founder, One Health Initiative Autonomous Pro Bono team and website.

__________________

 

Tackling the ebola epidemic in west Africa: why we need a holistic approach [One Health] – Posted One Health Initiative website NEWS Tuesday, July 01, 2014

A TIMELY serious One Health issue…

Tackling the ebola epidemic in west Africa: why we need a holistic approach

Immediate medical action is not enough to manage the disease. We need cross-sector collaboration and integrated research [One Health]

By Naomi Marks

Guardian Professional, Thursday 19 June 2014 12.18 EDT

As the death toll from ebola in west Africa continues to rise, there is a growing awareness of the threat of diseases transmitted from animals to people.

Ebola, a haemorrhagic fever that causes uncontrolled bleeding, is dramatic in its manifestation and has a case fatality rate of up to 90%. Its emergence can be sudden and unexplained, and, as the recent crisis shows, it can spread across communities and borders with alarming speed.

What the outbreak confirms is that if animal transmitted diseases such as Ebola – known as zoonoses – are to be tackled effectively, the response must go beyond media focus and immediate medical action when an epidemic hits. There is a crucial need for multidisciplinary working over the longer term to gain a holistic understanding of the drivers of these diseases.

This so-called one health approach takes as its premise an understanding that human health, animal health and environmental health are all interlinked. It calls for collaborative efforts between natural and social scientists – including doctors, vets, environmental scientists, geographers and anthropologists – at local, national and international levels.

Such a holistic understanding of health is not new. It is however increasingly gaining traction among those in the field, with the veterinary sector proving to be particularly quick to recognise the benefits of one health. A recent joint research initiative from the Department for International Development (DfID) and the social science, natural environment, medical and bioscience research councils, recognises the benefits of the approach. It aims to fund multidisciplinary research that would, among other benefits, reduce the impact of zoonoses on vulnerable people and their livestock.

When natural and social scientists work together – not just alongside each other, but meaningfully integrate their findings – it can be very productive. However, breaking down the barriers between researchers is one thing. The real challenge is to persuade those with the funds and the power to make cross-sector action happen. One of the issues that urgently needs to be tackled is a reconsideration of funding models to help facilitate cross-sector working.

Over the past 40 years more than 60% of emerging infectious diseases affecting people have had their origin in wildlife or livestock. Many of these zoonoses may cause death more slowly than Ebola, and remain unnoticed by anybody outside the immediate populations affected by them, but their effects are often devastating.

An example is trypanosomiasis, a disease caused by parasites transmitted by the tsetse fly, which affects both humans and animals and is widespread in large parts of Africa. This disease is one of four zoonoses being studied by the multidisciplinary research programme Dynamic drivers of disease in Africa, which is considering the complex links between ecosystems, zoonoses, health and wellbeing. While there were 88 Ebola cases reported in 2012, 50 of them fatal, there are an estimated 30,000-50,000 new cases of trypanosomiasis reported each year, with some 48,000 deaths recorded annually. In addition, the disease is likely to be misdiagnosed as in its early stages it is often confused with malaria and in its later stages with Aids.

Trypanosomiasis is fatal when left untreated and even when it is, it has a prolonged recovery period. As a result, it can ruin lives and livelihoods. The UN Food and Agricultural Organisation says the disease probably threatens rural development and poverty alleviation in sub-Saharan Africa more than any other disease.

Like ebola, a multidisciplinary approach to understanding trypanosomiasis is essential if it is to be controlled. Take Zambia, where trypanosomiasis has historically acted as a limitation on human settlement, with families keeping away from fertile but highly tsetse-infested areas. Land pressure is increasingly leading to colonisation of these areas. Land clearance for cash crops such as cotton is also thought to be having an effect on tsetse populations, and thus the spread of the disease.

In addition, there are likely to be social differences in vulnerability to trypanosomiasis, based on gender roles, livelihood patterns and the different ways in which people interact with their environment. These points are aside from other, 'macro' changes, such as climate change and urbanisation, which may be having an effect on tsetse ecology and disease transmission. Thus, it can easily be seen how medical research on its own is insufficient to understand and tackle the disease.

The stories behind a host of other zoonoses – from rift valley fever to ebola – are just as complex. Only multidisciplinary research can help to reveal and unravel their complexity. Without a holistic understanding of all the inter-related factors affecting the emergence, transmission and spread of zoonoses, disease management or elimination will remain beyond our reach.

Naomi Marks works for the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium.

Please see http://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2014/jun/19/ebola-multidisciplinary-approach-stop-epidemic.

 

Permission to post on One Health Initiative website by:

 

Naomi Marks

Communications Officer

Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium

STEPS Centre

Institute of Development Studies

Brighton, BN1 9RE

UK

Twitter @DDDAC_org

Tel: +44 (0) 1273 915606

 

 


American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) President’s One Health Support Comments to AVMA House of Delegates – Denver, Colorado (USA) - Posted One Health Initiative website August 6, 2014 - Wednesday, August 06, 2014

American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) President’s One Health Support Comments to AVMA House of Delegates – Denver, Colorado (USA)

 

July 25 – 29, 2014: The President-elect of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 2014-2015, Dr. Ted Cohn spoke to the AVMA’s House of Delegates at the AVMA Convention in Denver, Colorado (USA) about his commitment to One Health:

 

“To increase the value of our profession to the world, we must constantly pay homage to that immutable bond that exists between animals, humans and the environment – a world of one health. Only as a cohesive forward thinking organization, willing to collaborate broadly with other groups and other professions, can we begin to accomplish the dreams of Dr. James Steele and the promise of One Health. By increasing our support of One Health and working more closely with groups such as the One Health Commission and the very proactive One Health initiative Team, we can potentially provide new career paths for veterinarians. In addition, a very positive and not so accidental side effect would be to increase the public’s appreciation for our profession’s role and possible future roles in the protection and maintenance of human and environmental health.”

 

Ted Cohn, DVM, President

American Veterinary Medical Association

 __________________

 

Note:  The One Health Initiative team greatly appreciates the recent One Health comments by AVMA President Dr. Ted Cohn.  Similarly, we value the letter of recognition from the immediate past President of the AVMA, Dr. Clark Fobian http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/Kaplan_09-11-13.pdf posted September 12, 2013 on the One Health Initiative website’s Publications page http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications.php entitled American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Recognizes One Health Initiative Team and One Health Initiative website.

 

One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono Team: Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP ▪ Bruce Kaplan, DVM ▪ Thomas P. Monath, MD ▪ Jack Woodall, PhD Lisa A. Conti, DVM, MPH


The Critical Question We're Not Asking About The Ebola Outbreak - Huffington Post, July 31, 2014 - Saturday, August 02, 2014

Excellent One Health article on Huffington Post…

The Critical Question We're Not Asking About The Ebola Outbreak

Posted: 07/31/2014 6:39 pm EDT Updated: 07/31/2014 6:59 pm EDT

“The ebola outbreak in West Africa has the world on edge: Will the virus spill into new communities? Will it cross more borders? Even oceans? How can caregivers raise the victims' chances of survival, as well as reduce their own chances of getting sick?

Some experts emphasize the importance of another, generally overlooked question: How can we thwart such deadly outbreaks in the first place? … “

Please read full article http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/31/ebola-outbreak-causes_n_5638503.html?1406846385

 

Link graciously provided by Lynne Peeples lynne.peeples@huffingtonpost.com


The New One Health Journal Veterinary Sciences Released — Basel, Switzerland - Wednesday, July 30, 2014

The New One Health Journal Veterinary Sciences Released — Basel, Switzerland

The new online open access “One Health” journal Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381, http://www.mdpi.com/journal/vetsci) is now released and has published its first issue:

Vet. Sci., Volume 1, Issue 1 (June 2014), Pages 1-76 http://www.mdpi.com/2306-7381/1/1/

Table of Contents:

Editorial: Veterinary Sciences—A Forum for One Medicine, One Health

by Duncan Ferguson

Vet. Sci. 2014, 1(1), 1-2; doi:10.3390/vetsci1010001

http://www.mdpi.com/2306-7381/1/1/1/

Editorial: Animal Models and Better Understanding of “One Medicine”

by Duncan Ferguson

Vet. Sci. 2014, 1(1), 3-4; doi:10.3390/vetsci1010003

http://www.mdpi.com/2306-7381/1/1/3/

Article: Filarial Nematode Infection in Ixodes scapularis Ticks Collected from Southern Connecticut by Pabbati Namrata, Jamie Miller, Madari Shilpa, Patlolla Reddy, Cheryl Bandoski, Michael Rossi and Eva Sapi

Vet. Sci. 2014, 1(1), 5-15; doi:10.3390/vetsci1010005

http://www.mdpi.com/2306-7381/1/1/5/

Review: Review of Animal Models of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis

by Jessica Simmons, Said Elshafae, Evan Keller, Laurie McCauley and Thomas Rosol

Vet. Sci. 2014, 1(1), 16-39; doi:10.3390/vetsci1010016

http://www.mdpi.com/2306-7381/1/1/16/

Review: Non-Human Primate Models of Orthopoxvirus Infections

by Anne Schmitt, Kerstin Mätz-Rensing and Franz-Josef Kaup

Vet. Sci. 2014, 1(1), 40-62; doi:10.3390/vetsci1010040

http://www.mdpi.com/2306-7381/1/1/40/

Review: Respiratory Animal Models in the Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)

by Christoph Curths, Sascha Knauf and Franz-Josef Kaup

Vet. Sci. 2014, 1(1), 63-76; doi:10.3390/vetsci1010063

http://www.mdpi.com/2306-7381/1/1/63/

Full text can be accessed free of charge.

Provided to the One Health Initiative website July 28, 2014 by:

Ellen Lu

Managing Editor

Veterinary Sciences

____________________________

NOTE: 

About Editor-in-Chief, Duncan C. Ferguson, VMD, PhD, DACVIM, DACVCP, Professor and Head, Urbana, Illinois http://vetmed.illinois.edu/cb/

            Associate Editor, Margarethe Hoenig, DVM, PhD, Professor, Urbana, Illinois http://nutrsci.illinois.edu/directory/mhoenig

Drs. Ferguson, Hoenig and the Comparative Biosciences faculty at the University of Illinois, College of Veterinary Medicine are in the forefront of important One Health (One Medicine) collaborative research activities that affect animal and human patients.  In addition to “public health”, comparative medicine/translational medicine are critical clinical health components under the One Health umbrella. Interdisciplinary, collaborative comparative medicine research has, in the past, expeditiously developed and can significantly help develop future advances in diagnoses and treatments for cancer, cardiovascular diseases, joint and skeletal diseases, metabolic disorders, and others.

The One Health Initiative team congratulates the new Veterinary Sciences journal and endorses their comparative medicine One Health (One Medicine) approach.

One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono Team: Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP ▪ Bruce Kaplan, DVM ▪ Thomas P. Monath, MD ▪ Jack Woodall, PhD ▪ Lisa A. Conti, DVM, MPH


Tuberculosis in Animals and Humans: A One Health Approach - Monday, July 28, 2014

Tuberculosis in Animals and Humans: A One Health Approach

A power point slide presentation http://goo.gl/SVVFcv for the One Health Section of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) convention in Denver, Colorado on July 28, 2014 by:

 

Charles O. Thoen, DVM, PhD

Professor of Veterinary Microbiology & Preventive Medicine

Iowa State University

College of Veterinary Medicine

Ames, Iowa

 

Please see optional slide presentation link:

https://iowastate-my.sharepoint.com/personal/cthoen_iastate_edu/_layouts/15/guestaccess.aspx?guestaccesstoken=LKnmBcqEaGhftDQ6kjBJAAbSKBjiHdi5dBiYVZwOj1s%3d&docid=1e748d13f24f348cea0f0cccc46dbe363

 

Dr. Thoen is an internationally recognized tuberculosis expert, co-editor of the textbook Zoonotic Tuberculosis: Mycobacterium bovis and Other Pathogenic Mycobacteria
:: Click Here :: - 3rd Edition (2014), prominent longstanding One Health supporter/leader http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php and the current President of the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society (AVES).

 

Tuberculosis Overview (16324)
Public and Corporate Practice |  One Health
Monday | 11:00 AM - 11:40 AM
Colorado Convention Center: 303

https://avma.eventkaddy.net/sessions/16324

 


How to prevent the next Ebola outbreak - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists 07/13/2014 - 20:48 - Sunday, July 20, 2014

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists 07/13/2014 - 20:48

How to prevent the next Ebola outbreak

By Columnist *Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP Laura H. Kahn

“The Ebola virus has emerged in three West African countries where it had not previously been reported: Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. In early July, health ministers from 11 countries and representatives from the World Health Organization (WHO) and relevant partner organizations met in an emergency two-day meeting in Accra, Ghana, to strategize on containing the worsening crisis. So far, the outbreak is the largest and deadliest since the disease was first recognized in 1976 in northern Zaire. As of July 8, there had been 888 cases and 539 deaths, with a mortality rate over 60 percent. Previous outbreaks, in Central African countries, typically had mortality rates closer to 90 percent. …

“…This is why a One Health approach—an approach that recognizes the connection between human health and animal and environmental health—is so important in Africa. Healthy livestock promote healthy humans. Unfortunately, developing countries have difficulty providing food for their human populations, let alone their livestock. Livestock production accounts for relatively little agricultural output in sub-Saharan Africa. Public health and agriculture experts must work together to improve agriculture and figure out how to meet Africans’ demands for animal proteins in an environmentally sustainable way.”

Please read entire column at http://thebulletin.org/how-prevent-next-ebola-outbreak7312 

 

*International One Health physician leader, Dr. Kahn is a Research Scholar, Program on Science and Global Security’ Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University and Co-Founder, One Health Initiative Autonomous Pro Bono team and website.


Single One Health example shines during U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Laboratory Accident Reports - July 14, 2014 - Monday, July 14, 2014

*An Editorial News item Viewpoint…

 

Single One Health example shines during U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Laboratory Accident Reports

The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a press release July 11, 2014 outlining their recognition of and plans for remedying disclosures about a recent regrettable anthrax episode.  Steps for improving laboratory quality and safety were highlighted http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p0711-lab-safety.html. 

Noted in the second paragraph of the press release was, “While finalizing this report, CDC leadership was made aware that earlier this year a culture of non-pathogenic avian influenza was unintentionally cross-contaminated at the CDC influenza laboratory with the highly pathogenic H5N1 strain of influenza and shipped to a BSL-3 select-agent laboratory operated by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). There were no exposures as a result of that incident.  The CDC influenza laboratory is now closed and will not reopen until adequate procedures are put in place. Further investigation, review, and action is underway.”  Repeat: “There were no exposures as a result of that incident.” 

The New York Times report on July 12, 2014 http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/12/science/cdc-closes-anthrax-and-flu-labs-after-accidents.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&version=HpSum&module=first-column-region®ion=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0 mentioned this important item describing it as …”In a second accident, disclosed Friday, a C.D.C. lab accidentally contaminated a relatively benign flu sample with a dangerous H5N1 bird flu strain that has killed 386 people since 2003. Fortunately, a United States Agriculture Department laboratory realized that the strain was more dangerous than expected and alerted the C.D.C.”…

This potentially life saving “One Health in Action” by an essentially veterinary medical oriented USDA laboratory issuing an alert to CDC was wisely and promptly accepted; this is instructive.  It demonstrates how the One Health (One Medicine) approach—a collaborative, multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary paradigm—can and does significantly advance the public’s health.  The CDC maintains a One Health Office http://www.cdc.gov/ncezid/dhcpp/one_health/.

The salient point is that the majority of the dangerous pathogens are zoonotic agents, and thus all biosafety systems and protocols used by policy makers should involve both animal and human scientists thereby leading to a higher standard.

*The One Health Initiative website welcomes other responsible commentaries related to this subject and other One Health issues.  Please submit Microsoft word formated copy of 400 -1000 words containing a maximum of 6 references to kkm@onehealthinitiative.com for publication/posting consideration. 


A List of some current [known] “ONE HEALTH” activist University Institutions (USA) - July 11, 2014 - Friday, July 11, 2014

A List of some current [known] “ONE HEALTH” activist University Institutions (USA)

http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/One%20Health%20Universities%20USA%20July%2010,%202014.pdf

The One Health Initiative team* honors and congratulates each of these 32 One Health [or One Health related] programs (26 states) and—in the true spirit of One Health (One Medicine)—encourages continued collaborations (sharing information) between and among these institutions of higher learning.

Auburn University (USA)

http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/home/about-the-college/news/news-at-the-college/auburn-launches-one-medicine-cancer-initiative#.U7kHcU0U8dU

http://www.wltz.com/story/23090055/au-researcher-develops-bone-cancer-therapy-for-dogs  

Berry College, Mount Berry, GA (USA)

www.berry.edu/academics/majors/onehealth/

www.berry.edu/Templates/general.aspx?id=51539609661

The University of California Davis (USA)

http://globalhealth.ucdavis.edu/initiatives/one_health.html

North Carolina State (NC State) University (USA)

http://www.cvm.ncsu.edu/about/one-health.html

Colorado State University (USA)

http://www.today.colostate.edu/story.aspx?id=9210

Cornell University (USA)

http://www.acsf.cornell.edu/research/Focus-OneHealth.php

University of Florida (USA)

http://research.vetmed.ufl.edu/one-health-2/

Fontbonne University, St Louis, Missouri (USA)

http://www.fontbonne.edu/academics/undergraduate/departments/biologicalphysicalsciences/one-health-certificate/course-requirements/ 

University of Georgia (USA)

http://onehealth.uga.edu/

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (USA)www.vetmed.illinois.edu/onehealth/

Iowa State University (USA)

https://www.aavmc.org/data/files/annualconference/2014/ppt/Nolan.pdf

Kansas State University (USA)

http://www.onehealthkansas.ksu.edu/

Louisiana State University (USA)

http://www1.vetmed.lsu.edu/VCS/PDFs%20and%20Word%20Docs/item50038.pdf

University of Minnesota (USA)

http://www.cvm.umn.edu/respond/OneHealth/home.html

Michigan State University (USA)

https://www.msu.edu/~iih/onehealth.html

Mississippi State University (USA)

http://www.cvm.msstate.edu/index.php/about/dean-s-message

University of Missouri (USA)

http://mizzouadvantage.missouri.edu/medicine/

The Ohio State University (USA)

http://vet.osu.edu/cvm/one-health-college-veterinary-medicine

Oregon State University (USA)

http://vetmed.oregonstate.edu/one-health-osu-vet-med

University of Pennsylvania (USA)

http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/One%20Health%20Initiative%20NEWS%20June2013%20.pdf

Penn State University (USA)

http://science.psu.edu/science-seminars/archive/2014-science-seminars/conservation-and-the-one-health-approach

http://science.psu.edu/news-and-events/lectures-and-events/frontiers/learning-resources/learning-resources-2011

University of Pittsburgh (USA)

http://www.publichealth.pitt.edu/home/news/in-the-news/articleid/1578/pitt-upmc-receive-awards-to-create-clinical-data-research-network-conduct-comparative-effectiveness

A significant One Health translational medicine research approach…Regrowth of injured muscles in mice and humans has been demonstrated by a multidisciplinary research team - “An Acellular Biologic Scaffold Promotes Skeletal Muscle Formation in Mice and Hu – Posted http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/news.php Monday, May 12, 2014

Princeton University (USA)

https://www.princeton.edu/sgs/publications/articles/OneHealth-article-June-2010.pdf

Purdue University (USA)

http://www.purdue.edu/ethics/oie/003054-2014.html

Texas A & M University (USA)

http://onehealth.tamu.edu/challenge

http://onehealth.tamu.edu/about

 

Tufts University (USA)

http://www.tufts.edu/home/feature/?p=one_health

University of Tuskegee (USA)

http://www.onemedicine.tuskegee.edu/

Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine

https://www.vetmed.vt.edu/news/vs/issue03-06-june14/

University of Washington (USA)

http://deohs.washington.edu/hamp/

Washington State University (USA)

http://globalhealth.wsu.edu/newsletter/the-allen-school-update/archives/jan-feb-2014/one-world-one-health

Western University of Health Sciences (USA)

http://www.westernu.edu/veterinary/veterinary-research-overview/veterinary-research-interest-groups/#ccrprig

University of Wisconsin-Madison (USA)

http://researchguides.library.wisc.edu/onehealth

 Note: List alphabetized according to name of University.

 *One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono Team: Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP ▪ Bruce Kaplan, DVM ▪ Thomas P. Monath, MD ▪ Jack Woodall, PhD ▪ Lisa A. Conti, DVM, MPH


 
One Health Initiative
Home | About One Health | Mission Statement | One Health News | AVMA Task Force Report | One Health Newsletter |
Publications | Supporters | Supporter Endorsements | Upcoming Events | Contact Us