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American Veterinary Medical Association’s (AVMA) President-elect Endorses One Health concept - Friday, May 22, 2015

American Veterinary Medical Association’s (AVMA) President-elect Endorses One Health concept

Provided to One Health Initiative website May 19, 2015

“I have always been a strong supporter of the One Health concept. As the human population continues to increase and expand across the globe, the interconnection of people, animals and our environment becomes more significant and impactful. Multiple disciplines working locally, nationally and globally must collaborate to attain optimal health for all species and the landscapes they call home and share. The future of mankind depends on a strong relationship between all healthcare professionals, and veterinarians play a critical role in not only fostering that relationship but ensuring that it works for the benefit of animals, humans and the environment they share.”

Joseph H. Kinnarney, DVM, MS, President-elect

American Veterinary Medical Association

Note: Dr. Kinnarney https://www.avma.org/About/Governance/Leadership/Pages/AVMA-Officers-Dr-Joseph-Kinnarney.aspx is listed on the One Health Initiative website’s Supporters page http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php (scroll down).


Program Updates – Historic World Veterinary Association/World Medical Association Global Conference on ONE HEALTH - May 21-22, 2015 – Madrid, Spain - Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Program Updates – Historic World Veterinary Association/World Medical Association Global Conference on ONE HEALTH

 May 21-22, 2015 – Madrid, Spain

 

  • Final program of the conference (click here for the program in English and here for the program in Spanish)
  • Speakers biography and presentation abstract booklet (click here for the program)
  • Poster abstract booklet (click here for the program)

 

World Veterinary Association http://www.worldvet.org/ -- Contact e-mail secretariat@worldvet.org

World Medical Association http://www.wma.net/en/10home/index.html -- Contact e-mail secretariat@wma.net


“ONE HEALTH”, a significant international public health/comparative medicine paradigm shift! Why? How? - Wednesday, May 13, 2015

“ONE HEALTH”, a significant international public health/comparative medicine paradigm shift!  Why? How?

 

“The One Health Initiative is a movement to forge co-equal, all inclusive collaborations between physicians, osteopaths, veterinarians, dentists, nurses and other scientific-health and environmentally related disciplines, including the American Medical Association, American Veterinary Medical Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, American Nurses Association, American Association of Public Health Physicians, the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the U.S. National Environmental Health Association (NEHA) and many others worldwide http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php”. 

The One Health concept was embraced in an historic comprehensive American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) task force report http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/taskForce.php which essentially remains a valid, contemporary roadmap for establishing and implementing the One Health approach nationally and internationally.  Incorporated therein was the establishment of an implementing One Health Commission www.onehealthcommission.org.

To demonstrate the momentum of the One Health movement to date, note that the World Veterinary Association and the World Medical Association will be holding a first ever landmark One Health collaborative conference in Madrid, Spain May 21-22, 2015 http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/news.php?query=Reminder+Notice%3A+Historic+milestone+physician%2Fveterinarian+global+One+Health+conference%85

 

FINAL WVA/WMA Conference agenda - May 13, 2015 http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/FINAL%20PROGRAM.pdf

 

Out of a multitude of One Health achievement examples during the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, see the extraordinary tip of the iceberg below:

 

These include public health and comparative medicine issues such as Heart Disease, Cancer, Orthopedic Disease, Anesthesiology, Obesity, Parasitic Diseases, Tuberculosis, Global Infectious Disease, Influenza,  Human Hepatitis C virus, Tickborne Diseases, Food Safety, Hendra virus vaccine, Aspergillus felis, Immunizations (vaccinations), Lou Gehrig’s Disease,  Ebola, Antibiotic Use and Resistance, Staphylococcus resistant infections, Environmental health Policymaking, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever viruses, Renderpest, Emergency/Disaster preparedness and many others.

SEE: http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/ONE%20HEALTH%20a%20significant%20international%20public%20health%20comparative%20medicine%20OHI%20POSTING%20May%2013%202015.pdf


One Health: Public Health and Genomic Insights - April 15, 2015 - Saturday, May 09, 2015

U.S. Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Please see:

One Health: Public Health and Genomic Insights - April 15, 2015

or

http://www.cdc.gov/genomics/public/features/one_health.htm


Reminder Notice: Historic milestone physician/veterinarian global One Health conference… - Friday, May 01, 2015

Reminder Notice: Historic milestone physician/veterinarian global One Health conference…

 

World Veterinary Association/World Medical Association

GLOBAL CONFERENCE ON ONE HEALTH

 

Thursday, 21st May – Friday, 22nd May 2015

Madrid, Spain

 

Drivers towards One Health “Strengthening collaboration between medical and animal doctors”

 Final program agenda http://www.wma.net/en/50events/20otherevents/80onehealth/ONE-HEALTH-2015---Final-Program.pdf  

 

To register click here

__________________________________________________________

 

The World Veterinary Association (WVA) and the World Medical Association (WMA) in collaboration with the Spanish Medical and Veterinary associations are inviting you to participate at the Global Conference on 'One Health' Concept to be held on 21st and 22nd of May in Madrid, Spain (Vía de los Poblados, 3, A.M.A Parque Empresarial Cristalia - Edificio 4).   

 

The Global Conference aims to bring together Veterinarians, Physicians, Students, Public Health Officials, NGOs and others from the different world regions to learn, discuss and to address critical aspects of the 'One Health' Concept.

 

The main objectives of the conference are to strengthen the links and communications and to achieve closer collaboration between Physicians, Veterinarians and all appropriate stakeholders to improve the different aspects of health and welfare of humans, animals and the environment.

 

The conference sessions will focus on the issues of:  

  • Zoonotic diseases 
  • Antimicrobial resistance
  • Natural disaster management – Preparedness and vet-med collaboration
  • Environmental hazards exposure to humans and animals

During the conference breaks, poster sessions will take place.

 

Notice

·         Students, young and retired Physicians and Veterinarians will benefit from reduced registration fees.

·         Please note that the number of seats is limited


The SIAARTI Study Group in Animal Anesthesia (Naples, Italy) Issues Strong One Health Endorsement Message: Recommends Applying Comparative Medicine One Health Approach to human and animal anesthesiology - Saturday, April 25, 2015

The SIAARTI Study Group in Animal Anesthesia (Naples, Italy) Issues Strong One Health Endorsement Message: Recommends Applying Comparative Medicine One Health Approach to human and animal anesthesiology

 

One Health, One Medicine, One Anesthesia

 

By *Giancarlo Vesce, DVM and **Edoardo De Robertis, MD, PhD

      SIAARTIVet Study Group coordinators

Provided to One Health Initiative website www.onehealthinitiative.com April 24, 2015

 

“... All of the above beliefs are now shared within the SIAARTI (Società Italiana di Anestesia, Analgesia, Rianimazione e Terapia Intensiva) domain and cultivated by a group of veterinarian [DVM] and physician [MD] anesthetists, whose slogan is One Health, One Medicine, One Anesthesia: the SIAARTIVet Study Group (http://siaartivet.siaarti.it/en/)...

 

The One Health philosophy encompasses a combination of disciplines joined by the concept that our ecosystem relies on the welfare of animals and plants. By banning an anthropocentric approach, the One Health initiative www.onehealthinitiative.com aligns human medicine, veterinary medicine and agronomics, fostering cooperation with other scientific endeavors, from economics to engineering including the humanities, to achieve global sustainability. Further, the One Health, One Medicine, One Anesthesia paradigm fully embodies the One Health Initiative by promoting an interdisciplinary cooperation between human and veterinary anesthetists.

Anesthesia is a widespread medical practice rendering human and nonhuman animals insensible to pain, which is nowadays used for many other purposes other than just surgical analgesia. Anesthesia is a generic term encompassing several brain statuses ranging from anxiety diminution to sedation and surgical anesthesia, all the way to deep brain depression and death. We don’t know how and where in the brain these states generate from, but we are able to safely produce such a delicate and reversible phenomenon in humans as well in animals of any class and species.  In fact, the same anesthetic drugs produce similar effects in the whole animal kingdom, such as central nervous system (CNS) depression, analgesia, muscle relaxation, loss of reflexes, amnesia, and so on, including exceptions such as with ketamine anesthesia, whose [dissociative] features are observed independent of animal class and species.  Anesthetic induction, progression and emergence, as well as unexplained complications such as anesthetic delirium, happen throughout the animal kingdom with the same features in comparable classes of patients.

Veterinary anesthetists [veterinarians] deal with remarkable animal patients widely ranging in class, species, body mass and physiological variables, whose anesthetic requirements are met by the same drugs that their more specialized physician counterparts and colleagues use in humans.

It is worth noting that, even if overlooked, class, species, breed and individual anesthetic peculiarities do exist. It would probably be rewarding to observe more closely the physiological signs and the CNS response to anesthetic molecules in different species gaining from knowledge and skills of both kinds of anesthetists [physician and veterinarian]. At the same time, an in depth exchange of information on side effects and unwanted drug sequelae in humans and animals would possibly improve the outcome for both professions. Also, under didactic and scientific circumstances such wider knowledge would certainly produce larger benefits compared to present standards.

All of the above beliefs are now shared within the SIAARTI (Società Italiana di Anestesia, Analgesia, Rianimazione e Terapia Intensiva) domain and cultivated by a group of veterinarian [DVM] and physician [MD] anesthetists, whose slogan is One Health, One Medicine, One Anesthesia: the SIAARTIVet Study Group (http://siaartivet.siaarti.it/en/).

More than comparative medicine, such an approach to the One Health Initiative fosters a new philosophy based on cooperation between health professionals in a specific human and veterinary medical clinical field [specialty], in production animals as well as in pets and in free ranging animals: a new tactic to engage broad-minded specialists into a new approach to unsolved basic and clinical phenomena often lacking from simple observation(s) and traditional knowledge.

*Dr. Giancarlo Vesce, a veterinarian, is a full professor of Veterinary Anesthesiology, Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, University of Napoli Federico II Via F. Delpino, 1 80137,  Napoli, Italy. email: gvesce@unina.it Ph. 39 081 2536046 Cell: 39 3382707348. http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/Curriculum%20vitae%20Prof.%20Giancarlo%20Vesce.pdf

**Dr. Edoardo De Robertis, a physician, is associate Professor in Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine –University of Napoli Federico II – Italy. Clinical Responsibilities: Adult ICU of the University Hospital Federico II, Napoli, Italy. e_mail: ederober@unina.it Tel.: +39 081 7463550; Fax: +39 081 7464719. http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/De%20Robertis_CV%20eng%20%2008%2014.pdf


“What’s in a name?” Plenty! - Tuesday, April 21, 2015

A unique historical commentary from a One Health perspective…

“What’s in a name?”  Plenty!

Provided to One Health Initiative website www.onehealthinitiative.com April 9, 2015 by:

Jan Clement, MD, Hantavirus Reference Centre, Laboratory of Clinical and Epidemiological Virology & Rega Institute for Medical Research, University of Leuven, U.Z. Gasthuisberg, Herestraat, 49 B-300 Leuven, Belgium (Tel: + 32-16-347908; Fax +32-16-347900; e-mail jan.clement@uzleuven.be)

John P. Woodall, PhD, Nucleus for the Investigation of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Institute of Medical Biochemistry, Center for Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (e-mail: woodall@promedmail.org)

Charles H. Calisher, PhD, Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, 3195 Rampart Rd., Foothills Campus, Fort Collins, Colorado, U.S.A. 80523-1690 (e-mail: calisher@cybersafe.net)

 

“… in 1970, British veterinarians in Uganda sent 699 cattle ticks to the East African Virus Research Institute, from which a strain (AMP 10358) of Congo virus was isolated. These findings suggested that ticks could be vectors of the virus to humans and that livestock might constitute at least hosts if not reservoirs of this newly recognized hemorrhagic fever virus.  In May 1973, Greek veterinarians isolated AP 92 virus from ticks feeding on goats in Vergina, northern Greece.  Moreover they showed that AP 92 virus clearly reacted in immunodiffusion tests with the same goats’ sera.  In the same study they demonstrated that AP 92 virus reacted in the same way with Russian antisera to Crimean hemorrhagic fever virus and with antisera to Congo virus, provided by Chumakov and Casals, respectively.  Casals’ paradigm was thereby confirmed.  In subsequent years demonstrations of the relatedness of AP 92 and several other Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever viruses from Greece and surrounding countries allowed an increasing “One Health approach” to studies of this emerging virus.”

 

Words are the primary means by which we communicate with each other.  Use the wrong word, misuse a pause or a punctuation mark, and you might be misunderstood.  Viral taxonomists are particularly fussy about such things.  Viral taxonomists have conjured up rules and traditions to follow and most investigators adhere to such rules, which have been published by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV; http://www.ictvonline.org/).  However, some, by ignorance or arrogance, unintentionally re-invent taxonomy by misnaming their little friends.  This has caused complications and confusions that have had to be addressed.  The intent of this paper is to present three interesting examples of such misnamings, the problems thereby caused, and the possible solutions to those problems.  Reading this One Health Initiative website www.onehealthinitiative.com and/or the One Health Newsletter http://epi.ufl.edu/onehealth/news/one-health-newsletter/ is or should be important to physicians, veterinarians, osteopaths and others in health and environmentally related disciplines who intend to publish or to scan the scientific literature.

Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus: Although a similar disease had been reported at least 800 years earlier in what is now Tajikistan, beginning in 1944 Russian scientists were first to record the clinical aspects of Crimean hemorrhagic fever (CHF) and in 1947 demonstrated that it had a viral etiology in 200 Russian soldiers appointed by the Russian authorities to harvest crops during wartime in the Crimea instead of the local peasants, who had been driven away.  However, due to this unexpected and previously non-scheduled military activity, these soldiers had to sleep outdoors, were fed upon by ticks, and shortly afterwards many suffered a severe hemorrhagic fever, thus named CHF.

In 1945, inoculation of “volunteers” with filtered suspensions of ticks and with tissues of these CHF patients proved that CHF was caused by a tick-transmitted virus (1).  However, Russian scientists were unable to isolate the virus.  It was not until 1967 that the great Russian virologist Mikhail P. Chumakov and his colleagues formally registered an isolate of the virus from a fatal human case that occurred in Samarkand (in Central Asia, not in the Crimea) in the International Catalogue of Arboviruses Including Certain Other Viruses of Vertebrates (2).  This was the result of a visit, prior to publication of the description of Congo virus, to the second author [JPW] of this article who explained that the isolation had been made in newborn mice rather than in the adult mice the Russians had been using.  The following year the Russians published additional information about their virus (3), but they did not send the virus to the World Arbovirus Reference Center at Yale University, probably because of political constraints.

However, and unbeknown to them, in 1956 Ghislain Courtois, a physician working at the Provincial Medical Laboratory in Stanleyville (now Kisangani), Belgian Congo (now Democratic Republic of the Congo), had isolated a virus from the blood of a 13 year-old local African male with fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, backache, generalized joint pains, and photophobia.  Shortly after this virus isolation in his own laboratory, Courtois himself fell ill for three days with high fever and symptoms similar to his young patient.  Courtois isolated a similar virus from his own blood taken on the day of onset of his illness and named it strain V3010.  V3010 was later found in Greece, Portugal, South Africa, Madagascar, the Maghreb, Dubai, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Iraq.  Meanwhile, the virus was re-named “Congo virus”, but descriptive information about it was not published until 1967 (4, 5), the year before Chumakov et al. published their findings. Of note, Congo virus was also isolated from a cow in Kenya (4), and from a goat in Nigeria (6).

In February 1967, Congo virus strain V3010 was sent to the Rockefeller Foundation Virus Laboratory (RFVL) in New York City and there found by Jordi Casals to be identical to another virus, from Uganda, but to no other named virus. Chumakov later sent his strain to the RFVL, where it was found to be identical to the Congo virus (7, 8).  In 1970, Chumakov published a book in Russian including a chapter on isolations of the virus from ixodid ticks in European Russia. 

Also in 1970, British veterinarians in Uganda sent 699 cattle ticks to the East African Virus Research Institute, from which a strain (AMP 10358) of Congo virus was isolated. These findings suggested that ticks could be vectors of the virus to humans and that livestock might constitute at least hosts if not reservoirs of this newly recognized hemorrhagic fever virus.  In May 1973, Greek veterinarians isolated AP 92 virus from ticks feeding on goats in Vergina, northern Greece (9).  Moreover they showed that AP 92 virus clearly reacted in immunodiffusion tests with the same goats’ sera.  In the same study they demonstrated that AP 92 virus reacted in the same way with Russian antisera to Crimean hemorrhagic fever virus and with antisera to Congo virus, provided by Chumakov and Casals, respectively.  Casals’ paradigm was thereby confirmed.  In subsequent years demonstrations of the relatedness of AP 92 and several other Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever viruses from Greece and surrounding countries allowed an increasing “One Health approach” to studies of this emerging virus (10).

These findings and the dates of their publications created a nomenclatural quandary.  Should the virus be named “Congo virus” because it was isolated first, or should it be named “Crimean hemorrhagic fever virus” because a description of the disease was published first and because it incorporated the name of an important human disease?  Because this situation had both nomenclatural and political implications, the ICTV attempted to find a proper solution to it. Against the principles of scientific nomenclature based on priority of publication, recognizing that Congo virus was the etiologic agent of illnesses other than relatively simple fevers, including hemorrhagic manifestations (4), and because it seemed too late to rename it “Congo hemorrhagic fever virus”, in 1973 the virus finally was re-named “Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus” (C-CHFV; family Bunyaviridae, genus Nairovirus).  So there are now a number of publications in the literature with “Congo virus” and even “Congo-Crimean hemorrhagic fever virus” in the title.  Of course, this did not satisfy everyone but everyone recognized that life and taxonomists are not perfect and further arguments were settled or at least disregarded.  The virus is now known to be widespread in Africa, and from the Middle East and southern Europe to Asia, due to the preferred dry and sunny biotope of its global vectors, Hyalomma spp. ticks (10, 11).

Sin Nombre virus: Hantaviruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus), found essentially world-wide, are known to cause hemorrhagic fever with renal involvement in Asia (Hantaan virus) and, albeit somewhat milder disease, in Europe (Puumala virus).  Hantaviruses are rodent-borne but, while not seriously affecting the rodent host, cause serious, often life-threatening, illnesses in humans.  Prospect Hill hantavirus was recognized in the eastern U.S. but was and is not known to cause human illness.  In the spring of 1993 a then unexplained outbreak of adult respiratory distress syndrome was observed in rural residents of the Four Corners region (where New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, and Colorado are contiguous) of the southwestern U.S.  Antibody to a recognized hantavirus (Puumala virus) was detected in patient sera, suggesting that whatever the etiologic agent, it likely was a hantavirus (12).  It was quickly shown that this disease was caused by a previously unrecognized hantavirus (13).

The virus was first named “Muerto Canyon virus” after a nearby Arizona historic site (Spanish: Canyon del Muerto = Canyon of Death) where, in 1863, the U.S. Army killed Native Americans in order to control the land.  That name certainly was unacceptable to Native Americans and to others and so was replaced by “Four Corners virus”.  However, the name Four Corners virus was unacceptable to tourist bureaus and others in the area so was discarded and replaced by the name Sin Nombre (Spanish for “without a name”).  Viruses traditionally are named for the disease they cause, or the place where they were first recognized (or at least a general location, e.g., “eastern equine encephalitis virus”), so this name was not traditional.  However, given the intensity of the epidemiologic and laboratory efforts in the U.S.A. to understand the disease and to prevent it at that time, naming the virus was considered of relatively trivial importance, and the name Sin Nombre virus was accepted by everyone, even if only for expedience.

Tick-borne encephalitis virus: Tick-borne encephalitis is the name of a constellation of clinical findings.  It can be caused by any of a number of etiologic agents, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites but is most commonly thought of as being the result of infection with viruses of the family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus, although other tick-borne flaviviruses, i.e., Powassan virus, can cause this disease.  For many years these viruses were described as distinct and given distinct names in different locations.  Later, more detailed studies showed that most were redundant descriptions, the data were merged, and the number of names thankfully reduced.  More recently, molecular studies have led to separation of these viruses as subtypes of a single species, Tick-borne encephalitis virus, European subtype, Far Eastern subtype, and Siberian subtype.  This nomenclature (and taxonomy) is far from satisfactory, given that species are non-concrete entities (that is, they do not exist, except as names on lists; 14).  Obviously (to some), there cannot be a real subtype (a virus) of a non-real entity (a taxon).  It is hoped that someday this will be corrected.  Meanwhile, the same confusion of species (taxa) and viruses (the real deal) persists, probably and understandably because a relatively few understand what they are talking about.

There are other examples of virus names that are more confusing than helpful.  Viruses named after patients; after phages named for the bacteria from which they were isolated (Staphylococcus phage 44AHJD, for example; how does one teach a student to remember that?); names including the name of the genus to which it belongs (Australian bat lyssavirus and bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (redundant); viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus Fil3 (viral virus?); and many more.  Veterinarians almost universally call any of the 26 bluetongue viruses “bluetongue virus” when, in fact, “bluetongue” is the name of a disease and Bluetongue virus is the name of the species (taxon) in which these 26 viruses have been placed.  The point to be made is that care should be taken when first naming a virus and inventing a unique abbreviation for it, so that that name and its abbreviation cause the least confusion among those who will be writing and reading about it.

Note: Drs. Jan Clement and Charles Calisher are longstanding One Health Supporters http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php.  Dr. John (Jack) Woodall is a member of the One Health Initiative team and manager of the OHI website’s ProMED Outbreak Reports page http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/promed.php.

References

1. Chumakov, M.P. (1947) A new virus disease - Crimean hemorrhagic fever, News of Medicine.  Virus Diseases. 44:9-11. (In Russian).

2. Karabatsos, N. (ed) (1985). International Catalogue of Arboviruses Including Certain Other Virus of Vertebrates. 3rd ed., San Antonio, Texas. Am. Soc. Trop. Med. Hyg.

3. Chumakov MP, Butenko AM, Shalunova NV, Mart'ianova LI, Smirnova SE, Bashkirtsev IuN, Zavodova TI, Rubin SG, Tkachenko EA, Karmysheva VIa, Reingol'd VN, Popov GV, and Savinov AP (1968). New data on the viral agent of Crimean   hemorrhagic fever. Vopr Virusol. (in Russian) 13:377.

4. Simpson DI, Knight EM, Courtois G, Williams MC, Weinbren MP, Kibukamusoke JW. (1967) Congo virus: a hitherto undescribed virus occurring in Africa. I. Human isolations--clinical notes. East Afr Med J. (1967) 44:86-92.

5. Woodall JP, Williams MC, Simpson DI. (1967) Congo virus: a hitherto undescribed virus occurring in Africa. II. Identification studies. East Afr Med J. 44:93-8.

6, Causey OR, Kemp GE, Madbouly MH, David-West TS. (1970) Congo virus from domestic livestock, African hedgehog, and arthropods in Nigeria. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 19:846-50.

7. Casals J. (1969) Antigenic similarity between the virus causing Crimean hemorrhagic fever and Congo virus. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 131:233-6.

8. Chumakov MP, Smirnova SE, Tkachenko EA. (1970) Relationship between strains of Crimean haemorrhagic fever and Congo viruses. Acta Virol. 14:82-5.

9. Papadopoulos O and Koptopoulos G. (1978) Isolation of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus from Rhipicephalus bursa ticks in Greece. Acta Microbio Hellenica. 23:20-8 (in Greek with English summary)

10. Papa A, Dalla V, Papadimitriou E, Kartalis GN, Antoniadis A. (2010) Emergence of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever in Greece. Clin Microbiol Infect. 16:843-7.

11. Bente, DA, Forrester NL, Watts DM, McAuley AJ, Whitehouse CA, Bray M (2013) Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever: History, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical syndrome and genetic diversity. Antiviral Res. 100:159-89.

12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Update: outbreak of hantavirus infection-southwestern United States, 1993. (1993) Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 42:441-79.

13. Hjelle B, Jenison S, Torrez-Martinez N, Yamada T, Nolte K, Zumwalt R, MacInnes K, Myers G. (1994) A novel hantavirus associated with an outbreak of fatal respiratory disease in the southwestern United States: evolutionary relationships to known hantaviruses. J Virol. 68:592-6.

14. Van Regenmortel MH. (2003) Viruses are real, virus species are man-made, taxonomic constructions. Arch Virol. 148:2481-8.


One Health Zoonoses consequences Considered in “Disease Scenarios Africa” website - Friday, April 17, 2015

One Health Zoonoses consequences Considered in “Disease Scenarios Africa” website

A new website (www.diseasescenarios.org) exploring disease scenarios for four zoonotic diseases in five African countries has been launched by the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (www.driversofdisease.org). The Disease Scenarios Africa site presents the findings of workshops which posed 'What if ... ' questions to experts from a wide range of disciplines. The scenarios explored included a +3C rise in temperature, major agricultural expansion and an investment in One Health. The site is expected to help policymakers, researchers and communities identify a range of futures, as well as improve understanding and start discussion about desirable ones. It is hoped it will also spur action aimed at creating more resilient societies.

The case studies considered are Lassa fever in Sierra Leone, Rift Valley fever in Kenya, henipavirus infection in Ghana, and trypanosomiasis in Zambia and Zimbabwe. Victor Galaz, assistant professor at the Stockholm Resilience Centre who led the work, writes in a Lancet Global Health (http://globalhealth.thelancet.com/2015/03/31/preparing-zoonotic-surprise) blog: “Sophisticated macro-models will, and should, continue to play an important role in the global health community’s attempts to explore future zoonotic disease risks. However, understanding Anthropocene disease risks will require more than large datasets, statistical ingenuity and massive computing power. It will also require abilities to combine multiple knowledge systems, multidisciplinary innovation, and well-developed communication skills.”

The scenarios project will continue with villager workshops, the results of which will be added to the website during a Phase II of the project.

 

Provided to the One Health Initiative website on April 14, 2015 by:

Naomi Marks

Project Communications Manager

Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium | Twitter @DDDAC_org

Social, Economic and Environmental Drivers of Zoonoses in Tanzania (SEEDZ) | Twitter @SEEDZ_TZ  

ESRC STEPS Centre, Institute of Development Studies

Tel: +44 (0) 1273 915606


Two One Health Programs work to integrate human health into “One Health” (USA) - Monday, April 13, 2015

Two One Health Programs work to integrate human health into “One Health” (USA)

*Peter M. Rabinowitz, MD, MPH and **Eleanor M. Green, DVM, DACVIM, DABVP

 

Provided to the One Health Initiative website www.onehealthinitiative.com on April 8, 2015

 

While One Health stresses the interdisciplinary collaboration and cooperation between human, animal, and environmental health professionals, as well as other disciplines, some have reported that human health has been underrepresented in current One Health efforts at the University level.  In response to this need, two U.S. One Health Programs, one based at Texas A&M University and the other at the University of Washington, are taking innovative steps to bring more human health care professionals into the realm of One Health.

At Texas A&M University, a One Health initiative was formed in 2013 following discussions between the deans of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences and the College of Medicine. Soon afterwards, “One Health” was designated a university Grand Challenge, signifying an important societal impact area built upon notable university strengths.

An essential component of the One Health Grand Challenge is active participation by multiple colleges across the university and today all colleges at Texas A&M are contributing. While educational, research, and outreach programs in One Health are expanding, one prime example of the partnership between human and veterinary health care professionals with an inclusive approach is the summer practicum experience in Ometepe, Nicaragua. 

A multidisciplinary team of students and faculty include medical students, veterinary medical students, public health students, and agriculture from Texas A&M University http://onehealth.tamu.edu/about/partners and other universities, the first being the University of California Davis (USA) http://globalhealth.ucdavis.edu/initiatives/one_health.html. The students train and work together to collect data to determine the major health challenges in people, animals, and the environment and to provide sustainable solutions for the community, doing so with full understanding of local culture, assets, and limitations. They provide clinical care to both people and animals in a rural setting.

At the clinic sites, there is true cross coverage and cross training among the students, with the medical students working with the local veterinarian to take care of the animal patients and the veterinary medical students working with the physician in the care of the human patients. Through this model there is a continuous rotation of students working in all areas of human, animal, and public health.

Based upon surveys, human and animal patient examinations, and diagnostic testing, areas of needed focus are determined. Nicaragua is certain to benefit from this One Health approach, which is identifying tangible connections between human, animal, and environmental health. Each year new One Health care teams will visit Nicaragua to build upon the findings and recommendations of previous teams. In addition, as part of recent curriculum revisions in College of Medicine, Texas A&M medical students will now be able to choose a One Health emphasis as an elective component of their training, resulting in a certificate in One Health.  The certificate in One Health is also available to all professional students across Texas A&M University, including veterinary medical students.  The students have also formed a Student One Health Association.

At the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, the recently formed UW Center for One Health Research (COHR) http://deohs.washington.edu/cohr/ is one of the few One Health programs nationally that is based in a public health/medical school complex rather than primarily at a veterinary medical school. COHR is serving as a means for medical and public health students, including global health and environmental health majors, to get involved with One Health efforts, including programs at the Washington State College of Veterinary Medicine.

University of Washington medical students recently teamed up with their counterparts in the WSU College of Veterinary medicine to create student posters for the Zoobiquity http://zoobiquity.com/ 4 conference held in Seattle in November 2014, collaborating on subjects such as Ebola infections across species. UW medical students and public health students are actively working with the Center for One Health Research on a number of projects, including investigation of E coli O157 infections in humans and animals, sharing of microbiome between humans and domestic animals, antibiotic resistance in different species, and the effect of natural gas extraction activities on the health of humans and animals.  COHR has also proposed starting a training track for animal and human health professionals (Occupational Health at the Human Health Interface: OHHAI) to prepare them for careers involved in research and practice regarding  the unique occupational health needs of animal workers including workers in animal agriculture, veterinary workers, and workers with wildlife contact. COHR has applied to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health for funding for this program and is hoping to initiate training activities later this year.

*Dr. Peter M. Rabinowitz http://deohs.washington.edu/faculty/rabinowitz_peter, a physician One Health leader, is director of the UW Center for One Health research in Seattle, Washington (USA).  Dr. Rabinowitz is a longstanding collaborator with the One Health Initiative team and concomitantly a member of the One Health Initiative team’s Honorary Advisory Board http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/advBoard.php.  Notably, Dr. Rabinowitz and Dr. Lisa A. Conti [DVM, MPH], an internationally recognized veterinarian One Health leader and member of the One Health Initiative team, collaborated jointly to co-write/edit and publish the landmark One Health textbook Human-Animal Medicine – Clinical Approaches to Zoonoses, Toxicants and other Shared Health Risks http://www.us.elsevierhealth.com/product.jsp?isbn=9781416068372 - 1st Edition (2010).

**Dr. Eleanor M. Green http://vetmed.tamu.edu/dean, a veterinarian One Health leader, is Carl B. King Dean of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas (USA) and a longstanding One Health Supporter http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/supporters.php.  Dr. Green’s progressive interdisciplinary/multidisciplinary One Health leadership at Texas A & M has been previously documented on the OHI website: http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/news.php?query=Texas+A+%26+M.


“Emerging Viral Diseases: The One Health Connection: Workshop Summary (2015)” - Thursday, April 09, 2015

An important One Health publication…of the National Academies Press (USA):

 

“Emerging Viral Diseases:

The One Health Connection: Workshop Summary (2015)

See: http://www.nap.edu/catalog/18975/emerging-viral-diseases-the-one-health-connection-workshop-summary

NOTE: Reports from the National Academies Press are free to read or download for personal use at our website, http://www.nap.edu. To download, please choose the “Download Free PDF” option. You will see a screen asking you to log in to your MyNAP account. MyNAP is a free login service that lets you download free PDFs on the NAP website, and offers an interface where you can maintain a list of NAP books that you have downloaded or purchased, books that you have added for later, bookmarks that you have made in OpenBooks, and see books recommended for you. To learn more about MyNAP, click here (http://www.nap.edu/content/using-mynap).

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Instructions for free downloading and reading of this important “Emerging Viral Diseases: The One Health Connection: Workshop Summary (2015)” [and others] from the National Academies Press were graciously provided to the One Health Initiative website by:

Barbara Murphy

Assistant Manager, Sales & Marketing

National Academies Press

500 5th Street, NW | Washington, DC  20001


 
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