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World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and World Health Organization (WHO) enlarge their collaboration commitment to face health challenges - ONE HEALTH APPROACH - Saturday, October 14, 2017

World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and World Health Organization (WHO) enlarge their collaboration commitment to face health challenges

Today, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have released their second Tripartite strategic document  reaffirming their commitment to provide multi-sectoral, collaborative leadership in addressing health challenges. The scope of their collaboration will be enlarged to more broadly embrace the “One Health” approach recognizing that human health, animal health and the environment are interconnected.

Paris, Rome, Geneva – 13 October 2017: FAO, the OIE and WHO have been working together for years to address risks at the human-animal-ecosystems interface. Their collaborative work was formally laid down in 2010 in the FAO/OIE/WHO Tripartite Concept Note, and on multiple occasions, the three Organisations demonstrated that bringing together their knowledge, insights and technical capacities in human and animal health, food and agriculture, can generate strong synergies, which will yield more robust, effective and cost-efficient solutions to the complex problems facing the world today. ...

SEE complete press release at:  https://goo.gl/hTdPCD & https://goo.gl/5Dxm9M


2017 NIAA Antibiotic Symposium to Feature Dr. Laura Kahn - Tuesday, October 10, 2017

For Immediate Release                                                                             Contact: Katie Ambrose

Date: October 10, 2017          Katie.Ambrose@animalagriculture.org                                                                                                                                719-538-8843, Ext. 14

2017 NIAA Antibiotic Symposium to Feature Dr. Laura Kahn
on Antibiotic Stewardship, Sustainability and Uncertainty

Colorado Springs, CO---“When antibiotic resistance is viewed using the One Health concept, linking human, animal and environmental health, as a framework, the issue becomes more complicated than what we initially thought,” says Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP, FACP, Research Scholar, Princeton University and one of the keynote speakers at the upcoming NIAA Antibiotics Symposium.

Antibiotic Stewardship: Collaborative Strategy for Animal Agriculture and Human Health is the theme for the 7th Antibiotic Symposium presented by the National Institute for Animal Agriculture (NIAA), once again bringing together all sectors of the animal food production industry and partners in human medicine and public health. This year’s Symposium will be held October 31-November 2, 2017, at the Hyatt Regency Dulles, Herndon, VA.

Dr. Kahn is a Co-Founder of the One Health Initiative, author of “One Health and the Politics of Antimicrobial Resistance” and a Research Scholar for the Program on Science and Global Security, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University.

“There are completely unexpected findings that should make us all give pause to what we are doing,” says Dr. Kahn.

Antibiotics are important to human health because they are the foundation of modern medicine. Without the ability to treat bacterial infections, elective surgeries and other treatments would be too risky to be considered. Agriculture is the foundation of civilization itself, and modern animal agriculture is dependent on antibiotics.

“The environmental portion is also huge,” says Dr. Kahn. “Most of our antibiotics come from soil microbes and we don’t know what goes on in the soil. Most soil microbes cannot be grown in the laboratory. So instead, scientists extracted DNA directly from the soil to see what was going on. What they found was astonishing: antimicrobial resistance genes were everywhere and appear to be ancient. Also, we have discovered that our bodies have more microbial cells than human cells. We have been overusing antibiotics and have been changing the microbial ecosystems in our bodies and on the planet.”

Dr. Kahn recommends using new technologies to better understand the etiology and epidemiology of antimicrobial resistant microbes by using whole genome sequencing of these bacteria instead of simply tracking resistance genes. Trying to figure out how resistant bacteria are related to each other by only looking at their resistance genes, Dr. Kahn says, is like putting a bunch of red headed people together in a room and trying to figure out how they are related to each other based on their hair color. It simply cannot be done.

We need to look at the entire genome of the organism,” she says, “and when you do that, some very unexpected findings appear.” Before 2008, it was too difficult and too expensive to do whole genome sequencing. Now, some hospitals are starting to do whole genome sequencing surveillance to obtain a better picture of what’s going on.

Ultimately our dependence on antibiotics is a problematic strategy, according to Dr. Kahn, who feels antibiotics may have to “go by the wayside.”

“No one in medicine or agriculture wants to hear that,” she admits. “After all, what’s going to replace them?”

There are options. Dr. Kahn notes that bacteriophages, which are tiny viruses, are the natural foe of bacteria. They’ve likely been at war with each other since the dawn of microbial life on the planet. “There was interest in phages in the early 20th century,” says Dr. Kahn. “but phages are hard to isolate and difficult to use. Interest in them essentially vanished when antibiotics came on the scene because they were easier to use and effective.”

Bacteriophages (a.k.a. “phages”) require precise diagnostic capabilities that we don’t currently have, says Dr. Kahn. Their use would mean that the practice of medicine would have to change and agriculture would have to adapt, too.

“In the end, however, their use would be more sustainable,” she says.

Asked what the timeline for finding a solution to antibiotic resistance might be, Dr. Kahn cites a 2016 report from Great Britain that estimates that currently at least 700,000 people die each year from antimicrobial resistant complications and could increase in 30 years to 10,000,000 deaths annually around the world. Obviously, human and animal health need to find a solution before we get to that number.

For more information or to register for the 2017 NIAA Antibiotic Symposium, go to NIAA’s website, www.animalagriculture.org. Early bird registration discounts apply until October 13th.

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Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (USA) One Health Task Force - Sunday, October 08, 2017

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Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (USA) One Health Task Force

SEE http://www.agriculture.pa.gov/Protect/AHDServices/Pages/One-Health-Task-Force.aspx


National Institute for Animal Agriculture (NIAA) Antibiotics Symposium Speaker Dr. Lonnie King: Urgent to Act Now -- October 31- November 2, 2017 - Hyatt Regency Dulles, Herndon, VA. (USA) - Wednesday, October 04, 2017

For Immediate Release                                                                    Contact: Katie Ambrose
Date: October 3, 2017                                               Katie.Ambrose@animalagriculture.org                                719-538-8843 Ext. 14

National Institute for Animal Agriculture (NIAA) Antibiotics Symposium Speaker Dr. Lonnie King: Urgent to Act Now

There are important issues to be discussed at the upcoming NIAA-hosted Antibiotic Symposium which, according to keynote speaker Dr. Lonnie King, are cost effective, can be implemented quickly, and can have an impact on antibiotic resistance now. 

Antibiotic Stewardship: Collaborative Strategy for Animal Agriculture and Human Health is the theme for the 7th Antibiotic Symposium presented by the National Institute for Animal Agriculture (NIAA), once again bringing together all sectors of the animal food production industry and partners in human medicine and public health. This year’s Symposium will be held October 31-November 2, 2017, at the Hyatt Regency Dulles, in Herndon, VA.

Dr. King, Professor and Dean Emeritus, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, is presenting the closing remarks at the two and a half-day Symposium. His topic, What MUST Be Done Next: Prioritizing Immediate Actions, will seek to integrate the conclusions of the previous presenters, panel discussions and the deliberations of the participants into actions.

“We need different voices to produce consensus and cause action,” says Dr. King of the NIAA’s well-known focus on collaboration and bringing stakeholders together to analyze, evaluate, and discuss issues vital to the animal ag industry. Since 2011, NIAA has provided a setting for a thoughtful exchange of ideas for the betterment of animal and human health, including the use of antibiotics and the threat of resistance.

First, says Dr. King, is stewardship. “It doesn’t cost a lot to make good decisions and yet it does a lot to move the dial on the reduction of unnecessary use of antibiotics.” He cites thoughtful decisions that are made by health care providers and producers about the use of antibiotics.

Approximately 270 million prescriptions are written every year in human health, just for outpatients. At least 30% may be unnecessary, according to the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in collaboration with Pew Charitable Trusts and other public health and medical experts. Stewardship, in human health, is an effort to counter this unnecessary use of antibiotics being prescribed by clinicians and other healthcare professionals. In animal ag, too, stewardship is of growing importance to help ensure that antibiotics are used appropriately, judiciously, and to optimize health outcomes while reducing any negative consequences.

“Antibiotic resistance is a crisis in human health, and it could be crisis in animal health if we don't get on top of it,” says Dr. King. “After six years of discussion, we can see clearly that while improvements have been made, globally, we are probably further behind than we were in 2011.”

In the US, the recent adoption of FDA guidance and changes to the Veterinary Feed Directive to eliminate the use of medically important antibiotics to promote growth in food animals has been a game changer for production animal agriculture. However, he says, unless we can get better baseline measurements of where we started to compare with what comes next, we can't tell how productive it will be, or the potential costs and health impact of these changes.

Another part of the equation, according to Dr. King, is awareness and education. “The public and our producers both need an improved awareness of antibiotic resistance. It is a very complicated issue and we need to make it more personal, better understood and tackled with a greater sense of urgency. While more studies and research are needed, we already know enough to act aggressively and decisively to effectively address antibiotic resistance,” says Dr. King.

Dr. King complements NIAA for pushing forward a variety of voices of animal health and human health. “NIAA is forward-looking and deserves a lot of credit for the kinds of meetings that really result in follow-up and actions,” says Dr. King.

For more information or to register, go to NIAA’s website, www.animalagriculture.org. Early bird registration discounts apply until October 13th.

NOTE:  Lonnie J. King, DVM, MP, MPA - Former director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control's (CDC) new National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED) and past dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine, Professor of Preventive Medicine and current Interim Vice President for Agriculture and Dean for the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at Ohio State University (USA) is an internationally renowned One Health expert and leader.  Dr. King also serves as a member of the One Health Initiative team’s Advisory Board http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/advBoard.php.


Attacking cancer with One Health approach is topic of Nov. 1, 2017 event - Thursday, September 28, 2017

Attacking cancer with One Health approach is topic of Nov. 1 event

http://olathe.k-state.edu/about/news/2017/sept17/onehealthday92817.html

K-State Olathe - Kansas State University

Kansas City One Health Day is from 4-6:30 p.m. Nov. 1 at K-State Olathe. The free event spotlights One Health — a collaborative research approach to ...

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On World Day, UN announces global initiative to end deaths from dog-transmitted rabies by 2030 - Thursday, September 28, 2017

HomeUnited Nations NEWS Centre

 

On World Day, UN announces global initiative to end deaths from dog-transmitted rabies by 2030

SEE Complete Article http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=57762#.Wc1IEORe4jY

28 September 2017 – The largest global anti-rabies initiative to end human deaths from dog-transmitted rabies by 2030 was announced, today, World Rabies Day, making it a priority disease for key international organizations and governments, according to the United Nations health agency.

“The plan ensures support to countries in developing national plans, and provides innovative training and education tools across regional rabies networks,” said Dr. Bernadette Abela-Ridder today in a press statement on behalf the United Against Rabies collaboration, consisting of the World Health Organization (WHO), Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO), World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), and Global Alliance for Rabies Control (GARC).

The plan Zero by 30: The Strategic Plan centres on a ‘One Health’ approach, addressing the disease in a holistic and cross-sectoral manner while highlighting the important role veterinary, health and educational services play in rabies prevention and control.

“Vaccines are a key component of the global plan and a trigger for national programmes. The United Against Rabies collaboration provides leadership and advocates for resources critical to reaching zero human rabies deaths by 2030,” Dr. Abela-Ridder added.

Rabies – a viral disease that occurs in more than 150 countries and territories – is usually fatal once symptoms appear. Dog-transmitted rabies accounts for about 99 per cent of human rabies cases. It is estimated that 59,000 people die every year from the disease. The statement pointed out that rabies is 100 per cent preventable, saying that the world has the knowledge, technology and vaccines for its elimination.

The alliance aims to prevent and respond to dog-transmitted rabies by improving awareness and education, reducing human rabies risk through expanded dog vaccinations and improving access to healthcare, medicines and vaccines for populations at risk.

Dr. Ren Minghui, WHO Assistant Director-General for HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, Malaria and Neglected Tropical Diseases maintained, “Working across sectors to eliminate human rabies aligns with WHO’s mission to leave no one behind by building a better, healthier future for people all over the world.”

The plan will generate and measure impact by implementing proven effective guidelines for rabies control, and encouraging the use of innovative surveillance technologies to monitor progress towards ‘zero by 30.’

“Eliminating human rabies contributes to the goal of providing affordable and equitable health care, while working with partners to prevent the disease in dogs, which is the most frequent source of infection," underscored Dr. Minghui.

The plan will also demonstrate the impact of the United against Rabies collaboration in national, regional, and global rabies elimination programmes to ensure the continued engagement and sustained financing of stakeholders at all levels.

Expressing FAO’s enthusiasm in being part of the development of the initiative, Ren Wang, FAO Assistant Director-General said, “Rural communities suffer the most from this preventable disease. Rabies puts not only their own health and wellbeing at risk, but also that of their animals, which can be a major or sole source of their livelihoods.”

“FAO has been supporting vaccination campaigns and the development of community-based programmes to prevent and eliminate rabies. This new initiative will enhance that work and can play an essential role in FAO’s overall goal to build stronger rural communities,” Mr. Wang stressed.


Elimination of dog-transmitted Rabies by 2030 targeted -World Veterinary Association (WVA) and World Medical Association (WMA) Joint Press Release - September 27, 2017 - Wednesday, September 27, 2017

SEPT 27, 2017: Elimination of dog-transmitted Rabies by 2030 targeted

 

World Veterinary Association (WVA) and World Medical Association (WMA) Joint Press Release

Please see: http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/WVA%20WMA%20PR%20WRD%202017.pdf


World Veterinary Association (WVA) and World Medical Association (WMA) Joint Press Release - September 27, 2017 - Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Elimination of dog-transmitted Rabies by 2030 targeted -World Veterinary Association (WVA) and World Medical Association (WMA) Joint Press Release - September 27, 2017

WVA [World Veterinary Association] President, Dr Johnson Chiang said: ‘Rabies control is a multidisciplinary and multidimensional activity. Participation and effective intersectoral cooperation among medical and veterinary professionals from government and academic institutions, civic and local bodies, national and international nongovernmental organizations, and animal welfare organizations is essential’.

WMA [World Medical Association] President, Dr Ketan Desai added: ‘If dog-transmitted rabies is to be eliminated, strengthening legislation concerning pet ownership, reducing the population of stray and unowned free-roaming dogs, broadly implementing dog vaccination programs, and provision of early rabies diagnostic facilities and adequate post-exposure health care are prerequisites. Dog-transmitted rabies elimination is an ideal opportunity to move the ‘One Health’ concept forward’.”

 


U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - Saving Lives By Taking A One Health Approach - September 2017 - Monday, September 25, 2017

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Saving Lives By Taking A One Health Approach

Saving Lives, Protecting People.
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What's New

One Health

Our recent work to connect human, animal, and environmental health in the US and around the world.

September 2017

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One Health Fact Sheet

Connecting human, animal, and environmental health

 

CDC’s One Health Office recognizes that the health of people is connected to the health of animals and our shared environment. A One Health approach encourages collaborative efforts of many experts (like disease detectives, laboratorians, physicians, and veterinarians) working across human, animal, and environmental health to improve the health of people and animals, including pets, livestock, and wildlife.

Check out the newest fact sheet to learn more about CDC's One Health work in the United States and around the world to protect the health of people, animals, and the environment.


Find updates about One Health, diseases spread between humans and animals, new infographics, and much more on our home page.


One Health Newsletter - Kansas State University (USA) - Sunday, September 24, 2017

One Health Newsletter

The first Kansas State University developed edition of the One Health Newsletter is scheduled to be released in October 2017, in advance of International One Health Day on November 3rd.  Contributions from professionals around the globe are welcome.   Previous issues of the newsletter and archival information can be found here.

The One Health Newsletter is a collaborative effort by a diverse group of scientists and health professionals committed to promoting One Health.  This quarterly newsletter was created to lend support to the One Health Initiative and is dedicated to enhancing the integration of animal, human, and environmental health for the benefit of all by demonstrating One Health in practice. To submit comments or article suggestions please email Rachel Reichenberger (rmcadam@vet.k-state.edu).

Please see http://www.vet.k-state.edu/OneHealth/ and Kansas State University (USA) Takes Over Production of One Health Newsletter https://goo.gl/QpAeaU.

 


 
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